Events in UCIS

Thursday, April 8 until Friday, April 8

8:00 am Conference
Georgia Consortium: Exploring the Complexities of Vietnam
Location:
Online via Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Register here.

Saturday, January 15 until Friday, January 28

(All day) Film
Virtual Film Screening of Things Left Behind
Location:
Online via Vimeo
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and National Consortium on Teaching About Asia along with Screenshot: Asia
See Details

Starting January 15 see Linda Hoaglund’s mediation on art and its place in memory and history. The film will be available January 15-29. Screening is free but viewers must register to get the link.

Hoaglund’s "Things Left Behind" explores the transformative power of the first major international art exhibit devoted to the atomic bomb. The exhibition, at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver, featured large-format color photographs of clothing once worn by those who perished, taken by renowned Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako. The film weaves together visitor responses to the exhibition with interviews that feature Ishiuchi to create a cinematic reverie about art's potential to recast historical memory.

Sponsored by SCREENSHOT: Asia, University of Pittsburgh Asian Studies Center, and University of Pittsburgh National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.

Wednesday, January 19

12:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
Reckoning with the Past I: Decolonizing the Curriculum in Europe
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Miami-Florida Jean Monnet European Union Center of Excellence, EU Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne, Center for European Studies at the University of Florida, Center for European Studies at University of Texas-Austin, Center for European and Transatlantic Studies at Georgia Tech University and Jean Monnet in the USA Network
See Details

This installment of Conversations on Europe is part of the Critical Area Studies of Europe Initiative.

For the 2021-22 academic year, the European Studies Center has announced its annual programmatic theme: “Recovering Europe.” Many of this year’s virtual roundtables will speak to this theme. In the Fall semester, sessions will explore economic and public health issues related to Europe’s recovery from the pandemic. In the Spring semester, sessions will consider different, and often uneven, attempts to reckon with and recover from the enduring legacies of European colonialism. The series will be bookended by sessions devoted to important elections impacting Europe.

Audience participation is encouraged.

Event information will be updated to include panelists and moderator.

Co-sponsors:
Miami-Florida Jean Monnet European Center of Excellence at Florida International University
EU Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne
Center for European Studies at the University of Florida
Center for European Studies at the University of Texas – Austin
Center for European and Transatlantic Studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Co-funded with support from the Erasmus + Programme of the European Union

7:00 pm Lecture/Presentation
The Katsura Village in the Modern Imagination
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Japan Foundation
See Details

Part two of series on innovations in contemporary architecture featuring professor Jonathan Reynolds

The 17th Century imperial villa at Katsura has loomed large in the modern imagination. It has by turns been praised as a masterpiece of Japan’s rich artistic heritage and been embraced as a precocious expression of modernist aesthetics ideals. Photography has played an especially important role in making this at times remote architecture and garden complex accessible to a world audience. This talk will discuss some of the most influential photographic interpretations of Katsura, paying special attention to the two remarkable and distinctive portfolios produced by the Japanese photographer Ishimoto Yasuhiro.

7:00 pm Presentation
Innovations in Japanese Architecture with Jonathan Reynolds
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Part two of series on innovations in contemporary Japanese architecture