Week of January 9, 2022 in UCIS

Thursday, April 8 until Friday, April 8

8:00 am Conference
Georgia Consortium: Exploring the Complexities of Vietnam
Location:
Online via Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Register here.

Monday, January 10

4:00 pm Information Session
East Africa Field-Based Program Info Session
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for African Studies along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
See Details

Come learn about the field-based summer internship and research program in Uganda and Kenya for graduate students from all departments. Dr. Louis Picard from GSPIA and Dr. Anna-Maria Karnes from the Center for African Studies will talk about the program and answer questions.

Thursday, January 13

12:30 pm Cultural Event
La Parlotte - French Conversation Table
Location:
Global Hub - 1st Floor Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Department of French and Italian Languages and Literatures
See Details

French casual conversation table. Open to all students of all levels of proficiency.

2:00 pm Cultural Event
Russian Tutoring
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
6:00 pm Film
Biabu chupea: El grito en el silencio
Location:
Virtual Screening
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
See Details

Colombia & Bolivia, 2020 | Documentary

This film deals with the "Embera Chami" society, an Amerindian community, where machismo is very present. This film denounces in a way the excision undergone by these women, which he will folow on a daily basis, and in particular Luz, hidden, masked, whose only hands, feet and hair are shown, singing of the pain of their bodies and that of having had to leave her village, following her refusal to keep quiet about her genitals removal.

She sings about her physical and psychological pain. These traditional songs accompany us through the film, as a prayer, bringing hope to the women and allowing them to speak. The body is taboo here, and the term "ablation" here extends far beyond a "little thing."

The violence of this practice is treated ina poetic, gentle way, contrasting with the theme. This documentary gives the women the chance to express themselves, the director gives them a voice.

7:00 pm Lecture/Presentation
A Tale of Three Pavilions
Location:
Online via Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Japan Foundation
See Details

Part one of series on innovations in contemporary Japanese architecture

Pavilions built for international fairs are unique structures able to materialize the fantasy of other worlds within the immediate realm of the visitors. Typically designed to represent the aesthetics and architectural character of foreign nations, these pavilions attain international meanings outside of their respective countries and respond to different regional contexts. This talk examines the evolution of this unique trans-national building type over the course of more than 150 years through three pavilions that link Japan with the West: British architect/designer Thomas Jeckyll’s Japanese-inspired pavilion designed for the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, the 1954-55 Japanese Exhibition House designed by Junzō Yoshimura for the Museum of Modern Art in New York that was later moved to Philadelphia, and the 2002 Serpentine Pavilion built in London by Japanese architect Toyo Ito.

Friday, January 14

5:00 pm Presentation
Multilingualism in a Global World
Location:
Online via Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Pitt Bradford
See Details

Join Vera Heinz cohorts Ambria Richardson, Bridgit Smith, Monique Hurlock, and Ty'Anne Nelson and guests discuss the importance of learning a second language

Saturday, January 15 until Friday, January 28

(All day) Film
Virtual Film Screening of Things Left Behind
Location:
Online via Vimeo
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and National Consortium on Teaching About Asia along with Screenshot: Asia
See Details

Starting January 15 see Linda Hoaglund’s mediation on art and its place in memory and history. The film will be available January 15-29. Screening is free but viewers must register to get the link.

Hoaglund’s "Things Left Behind" explores the transformative power of the first major international art exhibit devoted to the atomic bomb. The exhibition, at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver, featured large-format color photographs of clothing once worn by those who perished, taken by renowned Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako. The film weaves together visitor responses to the exhibition with interviews that feature Ishiuchi to create a cinematic reverie about art's potential to recast historical memory.

Sponsored by SCREENSHOT: Asia, University of Pittsburgh Asian Studies Center, and University of Pittsburgh National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.