Upcoming Events

Saturday, August 26

A Reading of The Shadow of Nanteos
Time:
7:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Presenter:
Jane Blank, Award-winning Welsh novelist
Location:
Welsh Room, 342 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center and Nationality Rooms on behalf of the St. David's Society and the Welsh Room Committee

The St. David's Society of Pittsburgh is pleased to welcome Welsh novelist Jane Blank, author of The Shadow of Nanteos, to Pittsburgh. As one of the most important houses in Cardiganshire, Nanteos has attracted people from around the world. The mansion is rich in mystery and legend: from lost treasure to the famous healing cup. With extracts from her latest novel, set in the 1750s during the notorious Cardiganshire lead wars, author Jane Blank will bring this fascinating house and its people to life. More information: www.stdavidesociety.org.

Wednesday, September 6

How Intra-Party Disagreement Determines Issue Salience and Diversity in Parties' Election Manifestos
Time:
12:30 pm to 2:00 pm
Presenter:
Zachary Greene, Department of Politics, University of Strathclyde
Location:
4430 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of Political Science

Despite incentives to present a unified front during elections, political parties are often rife with disagreements and differences in priorities. Yet, little is known about how parties negotiate between conflicting factions and intra-party groups. In this project, Dr. Greene considers competing perspectives that explain parties’ decision-making process. Do divided parties use campaign materials such as election platforms to detail carefully negotiated compromises or instead minimize policy disagreements by excluding discussion of these issues? Using evidence from Germany, Dr. Greene considers these perspectives by examining the content of speeches and election platforms from parties’ most important decision-making forum: the party national congress. The results suggest that different logics hold depending on the importance of the issue at hand.

Friday, September 8 to Sunday, September 10

European Studies Center at the Pittsburgh Irish Festival
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Various
Location:
Riverplex at Sandcastle, 1000 Sandcastle Drive, West Homestead (Pittsburgh), PA 15120
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Pittsburgh Irish Festival
Cost:
Student admission (with ID) in advance $10. Adults $12 in advance; $15 at the gate. Use the discount code H2PITT for an additional $2 off advanced purchase rate.
Contact:
Eliana Callahan, Educational Engagement Coordinator
Contact Email:
elianacallahan@pitt.edu

The European Studies Center will host a tent at this year's Pittsburgh Irish Festival. This marks the 27th year of this celebration of Celtic culture and the ESC will highlight opportunities for Irish Studies going on around Pitt. Thanks to this partnership, we are pleased to be able to offer discounted admission to all Pitt students, faculty, and staff. Just go to pghirishfest.org and use the promo code H2PITT to receive $2 of discounted advance tickets.

Wondering how you'll get there and where to park? The ESC has also organized a shuttle to take Pitt students to and from the festival grounds... for FREE! The shuttle will run from 4:00 pm to 10:00 pm Friday, and 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm Saturday. Pick up is outside Posvar Hall on Schenley Drive.

We've partnered with Irish Festival organizers and will feature three presentations at the Hedge School stage:

• Friday’s Hedge School 6:00-6:30: Nic Barilar, Ph.D. Candidate, Theatre and Performance Studies
Title: Irish Theatre at Home... and the Diaspora: The Curious Case of the 1957 Dublin Theatre Festival
Summary: “In 1957, the Dublin Theatre Festival was postponed - indefinitely. The festival was to feature new plays by some of Ireland's literary giants: Sean O'Casey, Samuel Beckett, an adaptation of James Joyce's novel ULYSSES. What led to the Festival's cancellation and what became of these plays? Join Nic Barilar, a PhD student at the University of Pittsburgh’s Theatre and Performance Studies Department, to find out…”

• Saturday’s Hedge School 6:30-7:00: Dr. Janice Vance, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh
Summary: “Since 2006, over 260 undergraduate students from the School of Health and Rehabilitation have studied in Ireland on the SHRS in Ireland Study Abroad Program. Dr. Janice Vance, a native of Belfast, directs the program which involves visits to multiple schools, clinics, hospitals and support organizations in Belfast and Dublin. The focus of the program is on the development of inter-professional insights in health and rehabilitation within contexts were the students can also learn about the influence of economic, political and social factors on policy and practice. Dr. Vance will reflect on the challenges and rewards of developing this pre-professional learning experience and the unique opportunities offered in Ireland.”

• Sunday’s Hedge School 3:00-3:30: Dr. Paul S. Adams, Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg
Summary: "Dr. Adams has led two Pitt study abroad courses to Ireland and Northern Ireland that focus on the development of the Irish state and the Troubles of Northern Ireland from the late 1960s to the 1990s. Dr. Adams' research and interests lie in the power-sharing arrangement that came about through the Good Friday Agreement of 1997 and brought peace to Northern Ireland. His presentation will focus on the current conditions in Northern Ireland and the unique opportunities Pitt students have had in their visits to Belfast that relate to the Troubles."

Wednesday, September 13

Treacherous Love Stories
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Denis Provencher, Professor of French, Head of the Department of French and Italian, University of Arizona
Location:
144 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Gender Sexuality & Women's Studies Program, Honors College and Humanities Center

Abstract for undergraduate lecture: Treachery? Treason? What exactly are these and how do they get woven together with love and romance in a context like the course here at Pitt called “French Kiss?” Not that anything French has anything to do with love, n’est-ce pas? Or does it? Are “all things French” related to kissing, romance, and love stories? Or can they turn treacherous when it involves strangers or enemies? This presentation is somewhat about a hook-up where the Frenchman sleeps with his (German) enemy during WW2 or perhaps with his North-African (Muslim) enemy in the post-9/11 or post-Charlie Hebdo attack era. Good French sexual citizens who collude, fall into bed with, and perhaps fall in love with their post-colonial counterparts. Treacherous love stories filled with trickery, exploitation, and even terrorism.

Queer Maghrebi French
Time:
1:30 pm to 3:00 pm
Presenter:
Denis Provencher, Professor of French, Head of the Department of French and Italian, University of Arizona
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Gender Sexuality & Women's Studies Program, Honors College and Humanities Center

Professor Provencher's general lecture will draw from his forthcoming book Queer Maghrebi French, which investigates the lives and stories of queer Maghrebi and Maghrebi French men who moved to or grew up in contemporary France. It combines original French language data from ethnographic fieldwork in Paris, Lyon, and Marseille with a wide array of recent narratives and cultural productions including performance art and photography, films, novels, autobiographies, published letters, and other first-person essays to investigate how these queer men living in France and the diaspora stake claims to time and space, construct kinship, and imagine their own future. By closely examining empirical evidence from the lived experiences of queer Maghrebi French-speaking performance artists, religious thinkers, novelists, and directors, as well as “everyday” (i.e., “non-artistic or non-creative”) study participants, this book presents a variety of paths available to these men who articulate and pioneer their own sexual difference within their families of origin and contemporary French society.

Thursday, September 14

European Studies Center Opening Reception
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center

The staff of the European Studies Center invites you to attend a reception to usher in the 2017-18 academic year. All interested faculty, staff, students, alumni, and members of the ESC community are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be served.

Wednesday, September 20

Conversations on Europe - Germany's Elections: What's at Stake in 2017?
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
211 David L. Lawrence Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of German

Friday, September 22

Modern History and the Reign of Questions
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Holly Case, Associate Professor of History, Brown University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The nineteenth century saw the explosion of questions: the Eastern, social, Jewish, Polish, worker and many other questions were hotly discussed in representative bodies, at treaty negotiations, and above all in the daily press. Over the course of the next century, these would be conglomerated into still bigger ones—the European, nationality, social, and agrarian questions—even as they fractured into countless smaller ones, like the Macedonian and Schleswig-Holstein questions, and made their way into various fields of human endeavor (there was cotton, oyster, and even a sugar question). What brought about the “age of questions,” and what does its trajectory reveal about Eastern Europe in the twentieth-century world?

Holly Case is a historian of modern Europe whose work focuses on the relationship between foreign policy, social policy, science, and literature in the European state system of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her first book, Between States: The Transylvanian Question and the European Idea during WWII, was published in May 2009. The book shows how the struggle for mastery among Europe’s Great Powers was affected by the perspectives of small states. Her lecture at the University of Pittsburgh is based on her current brook project that deals with the history of the “Age of Questions.” Case has written on European history, literature, politics and ideas for various magazines and newspapers, including The Guardian, The Chronicle Review, The Nation, Dissent, The Times Literary Supplement, and Boston Review, and is a regular columnist for 3 Quarks Daily.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Saturday, September 23

Teaching Foreign Language Across the Curriculum
Time:
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Rob Anderson, LAC Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Eliana Callahan, Educational Engagement Coordinator
Contact Phone:
624-3503
Contact Email:
elianacallahan@pitt.edu

Teaching foreign language across the curriculum is a means to internationalize courses commonly taught only in English. Students develop an enriched understanding of their chosen course of study while enhancing language skills in their second language. Educators bring world languages into areas of study beyond the typical foreign language and literature classes. This prepares educators and students for the cross-cultural and multilingual demands of global society.

Join UCIS for a one-day workshop for graduate students and faculty interested in teaching FLAC. Dr. Rob Anderson, LAC Coordinator from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will direct the workshop. A continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

There is no cost to attend the event, but pre-registration is required. Pre-register at http://flacworkshop.eventbrite.com/?s=77926837

Monday, September 25

The Russian-speaking Population in Post-Soviet Space: National Security and Minority Rights After Crimea
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Kristina Kallas, Director, University of Tartu Narva College, Estonia
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center; Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies; Ford Institute for Human Security
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

In the post-Crimea international arena, the Russian-speaking populations outside of the Russian Federation have once again become a central focus of journalistic enquiries and political analysis. Loyalties and identities of Russophones in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, where they are numerically the largest, and in Latvia and Estonia, where they make proportionally large share of the population, are under scrutiny. The lecture will focus on the conflictual interplay of regional security and stability strategies, Russia’s nation-building efforts and the questions of Russophone minority protection in post-Soviet space 25 years after the dissolution of USSR.

Kristina Kallas is the Director of Narva College at the University of Tartu. Her research and teaching focuses on nationalism studies, minority and fundamental rights, integration processes in multicultural societies, integration and migration policies, refugees and asylum seekers. Since 2015, she also heads the Supervisory Board of the Estonian Integration Foundation. Previously, she has been Senior Analyst at the Institute of Baltic Studies and Member of the Board for the Estonian Refugee Council.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Tuesday, October 3

The Archive and the Colony: Critical Romani Studies as De-Colonial Practice
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Ethel Brooks, Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies, Rutgers University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Humanities Center
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

The Roma have been the proverbial canaries in the coal mine as nationalism has pushed its way back into Europe, the United States, and the world. What are the insights that Critical Romani Studies can offer today? What connections can be forged between the study of Roma issues and the broader de-colonial turn in knowledge production? To answer these questions, Ethel Brooks offers a poignant and sensitive analysis of her discovery of Grannie Buckland, Gypsy Queen of Berkshire, catalogued among 18th and 19th century European queens in a British archive. To Brooks, images like Grannie Buckland's advanced Britain’s colonial and imperial project. She was but one example of the orientalist project to construct the subject over whom Europe would rule, and now over a century later, allows for “the creation of critical space for de-colonialization.

Ethel Brooks is the author of Unraveling the Garment Industry: Transnational Organizing and Women’s Work (University of Minnesota Press, 2007) which received the award for Outstanding Book for 2010 from the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the co-editor of the special issue of WSQ on "Activisms." Her lecture at the University of Pittsburgh has emerged from her two book projects: Disrupting the Nation: Land Tenure, Productivity and the Possibilities of a Romani Post-Coloniality, and (Mis)Recognitions and (Un)Acknowledgements: Visualities, Productivities and the Contours of Romani Feminism, both of which focus on political economy and cultural production and the increasing violence against Romani (Gypsy) citizens worldwide. She has been a Tate-TrAIN Transnational Fellow at the University of the Arts London since 2012, where she was also US-UK Fulbright Distinguished Chair from 2011 to 2012. Dr. Brooks serves as a member of numerous boards and commissions, including the USC Shoah Foundation, the European Roma Rights Center, and the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. She also served as a Public Member of the United States Delegation to the Human Dimension Implementation meetings of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and is a member of the United States Delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and its Roma Genocide Working Group. In 2016, President Obama appointed her to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council.

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Looking back at the German General Election
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Mona Krewell, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Cornell University
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center

Wednesday, October 11

Culture and Security
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institut, Germany
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, Ford Institute for Human Security, Humanities Center and Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe
Contact:
Zsuzsánna Magdó
Contact Phone:
412-648-7423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Security studies have given surprisingly little attention to cultural diversity as a constituent factor in the overall dynamics of security management. A case in point is that securitization theory still refers to cultural differences mainly as a source for conflict and therefore as an object of securitization. So far, cultural codes, linguistic barriers, and processes of self-identification did not constitute an important aspect of analysis. Culture as a value based concept and as a group marker, however, is not per se a primary source of conflict. Rather, culture appears as a symbol over and through which security concerns are articulated. Therefore, in multi-cultural societies cultural affiliation plays a crucial role in pre-structuring audiences and security agendas.

Addressing this emerging field of interdisciplinary security studies, this lecture is a lead-up to a day-long Graduate Student Workshop on Thursday, October 12. While the workshop is especially intended to Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science, all are welcome. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs by September 22, 5 p.m.

Since 2007, Peter Haslinger has been the Director of the Herder Institut for Historical Research on East-Central Europe in Marburg, Professor of East-Central European History at the Historical Institute of the Justus Liebig University and the Interdisciplinary Center for Eastern Europe in Gießen (GiZo). His research and teaching focuses on forced migrations and expulsions; the minority question; nationalism, regionalism, language policies; memory, museification, and the politics of history; security and violence studies; the spatial turn and the history of cartography; and the history of discourse and scientific communication. For a list of publications and awards, see https://www.herder-institut.de/en/institute-staff/staff/personen/ansehen....

This lecture is part of the REES Fall Series: Eastern Europe in the World.

Thursday, October 12

Graduate Student Workshop in Security Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Peter Haslinger, Director, Herder Institut, Germany
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center along with Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies, Ford Institute for Human Security, Humanities Center, Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe and Germany
Contact:
Zsuzsánna Magdó
Contact Phone:
412-648-7423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This Graduate Student Workshop follows on the previous day's lecture on Culture and Security. Master's and Ph.D. students in GSPIA, History, and Political Science researching security issues are especially welcome. Participants will explore the emerging interdisciplinary field of culture and security studies through a set of readings distributed in advance and will discuss research projects. To sign up, please contact Zsuzsánna Magdó, Assistant Director for Partnerships and Programs by September 22, 5 p.m.

Wednesday, October 18

Conversations on Europe - Religion in Europe: 500 Years Since the Protestant Reformation
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Friday, October 27

Dueling Market Power: The politics of stock exchange delisting in the transatlantic space
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Abe Newman, Director, Mortara Center for International Studies, Georgetown University; Chair, European Union Studies Association
Location:
4500 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of Political Science

Economic great powers export domestic regulatory policies and force the costs of adjustment onto foreign firms and governments. Such arguments about market power regularly examine economic great powers in isolation and, thus, have less to say about a world governed increasingly by economic multipolarity. In their paper, Dr. Newman and his associates argue that a great power’s ability to force foreign actors into adjusting is not only conditioned by their relative economic clout but also by the political institutions that govern their markets. Specifically, they expect that where states choose to draw their jurisdictional boundaries directly shapes a polity’s global influence. When a polity expands its jurisdiction, harmonizing rules across otherwise distinct sub-national, or national markets, it can curtail a rival’s authority. They test the theory by assessing foreign firm delisting decisions from US stock markets after the adoption of the Sarbanes-Oxley accounting legislation. The Act, which included an exogenous, extraterritorial shock, follows the harmonization of stock market governance across various European jurisdictions. Econometric analysis of firm-level data illustrates that EU-based companies, which benefited from jurisdictional expansion, were substantially more likely to leave the American market and avoid adjustment pressures. Their findings contribute to debates on extraterritorial governance and authority in a transnational economy, highlight the critical role played by institutions in economic statecraft, nuance arguments about Europe as an international actor and provide evidence in favor of more relational theorizing in International Relations that examines the nexus of market access, political authority and compliance.

Wednesday, November 15

Conversations on Europe - European Integration through Study Abroad? 30 Years of the Erasmus Program
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, December 6

Conversations on Europe - Brexit Update: Negotiating Exit
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, January 24

Conversations on Europe - Wind, Water, Sun: Clean Energy in Europe
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, February 21

Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, March 14

Conversations on Europe - May 1968: Legacies of Protest in France
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Wednesday, April 18

Conversations on Europe - Elections in Italy: A Next Wave for Populism?
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence