Events

UCIS Event Listings | UCIS Central Calendar

Monday, January 23

The Features and Outlook of China's Economic Transition
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Professor Haifeng Huang
Location:
4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Lecture will be given in Chinese.

Professor Haifeng Huang is working as a Professor and Assistant Dean at Peking University HSBC Business School, and is in charge of Peking University PHBS Center for Green Economy, a pioneering think tank for sustainable development in China. In 2015, Professor Huang received the Outstanding Innovation Award from the Education Forum in Asia, as well as the Lifetime Award from the International Workshop on Social Innovation and Sustainable Business Development. He obtained his Ph.D. at Humboldt University Berlin and studied at the School of Economics of Peking University and at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in their masters program.

Tuesday, January 24

Statebuilding, Peacebuilding & Hybrid Governance in Somalia
Time:
10:00 am
Presenter:
Ken Menkhaus, Professor & Chair, Political Science Dept., Davidson College
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
DRC51@pitt.edu

Somalia, often cast as the world's "most failed state," is starting to pull together a federal government. The challenges are daunting, and the hybrid forms of governance emerging there defy conventional statebuilding. Ken Menkhaus assesses the current conflict and governance trends, the role of corruption, and the changing security environment facing the next Somali administration.

Ken Menkhaus has taught political science as Davidson since 1991. His courses focus on international and comparative politics, as well as the non-profit sector. His regional specialization is on the politics of the Horn of Africa. He is a Senior Research Advisor and Fellow, ENOUGH project; Fellow, Rift Valley Institute Horn of Africa and Director of Studies for its Annual Course in Kenya; Lecturer, and an Editorial board member, Peacebuilding and Journal of Modern African Studies.

Refreshments will be served.

Latin American in Motion:
Pitt Latin American Films
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Public Health G23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, the Year of DIVERSITY at the University of Pittsburgh and Spanish Film Club by Pragda
Cost:
free
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

All Films will be screened at 7:00 p.m.
Public Health G23
130 De Soto St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(corner of 5th ave, and De Soto St.)

Come and join us for a film and pizza!

Free and open to the public!

Films:

OPEN CAGE
(Mexico)
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

THE SECOND MOTHER
(Brazil)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

THE CLUB
(Chile)
TUESDAY, MARCH 14

THE TRAVEL AGENT
(Cuba)
TUESDAY, MARCH 21

IXCANUL
(Guatemala)
TUESDAY, APRIL 4

All films are subtitled.

Wednesday, January 25 to Tuesday, January 31

LinkIn and Networking Workshops
Time:
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Location:
William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Tim An
Contact Email:
ysa@pitt.edu

Want to improve career placement skills in networking, communication, and resume writing? Come attend these events sponsored by the Career Development and Placement Assistance Office.

Tuesday, January 24, Government Resume Workshop presented by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, 1 p.m. in 224 WPU
Wednesday, January 25: Elevator Pitch Workshop at 11 a.m.-12p.m., in 224 WPU with snacks
Thursday, January 26: LinkedIn Profile Workshop at 10 a.m. in 224 WPU with Donuts
Thursday, January 26: LinkedIn Networking Workshop at 11 a.m. in 224 WPU with snack
Thursday, January 26: Practice networking from 4-6 p.m., Kurtzman Room, WPU, Hors d’oeuvres and Refreshments, prizes
Monday, January 30, Elevator Speech and LinkedIn, 2 pm 224, WPU
Tuesday, January 31, Networking Workshop (including Elevator Pitch) at noon in 224 WPU

Students attending the International Career Toolkit Series: 2017 Washington DC trip MUST attend and participate in two of the following workshops.

Wednesday, January 25

Racism in the African Diaspora
Parallels Between Racial Issues in America and Apartheid in South Africa
Time:
8:00 pm to 10:00 pm
Location:
Assembly Room, WPU
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with African Students Organization (ASO), Department of History, Department of Africana Studies, Honors College and Black Action Society (BAS)

The aim of this event is to bring together students and staff at the University of Pittsburgh in a panel style discussion about the varies parallels between racism and the civil rights movement in America and Apartheid in South Africa. We want students and faculty to be able to recognize patterns in history in an effort to stop it from repeating itself and be able to see their part in any change that may come in the future regarding racial and social relations in America and worldwide. During the event, we will show a short documentary and short video clips that represent the topic and we will have professors who are experience in each subsequent field talk about parallels while taking input from the audience and answering any questions.

Thursday, January 26

Political Rights, Social Rights, and the Decolonization of Africa
As part of the Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human Lecture Series
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Frederick Cooper
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with The Humanities Center

Frederick Cooper is a Professor of History at NYU. His interests include slavery and labor in the 19th- and 20-th century East Africa, the shifting nature of colonial thinking and practices, and the relationship of social change and conflict to decolonization in French and British Africa. His work seeks to counter both the national and the modern bars of most historical studies through the study of empires.

Political Rights, Social Rights, and the Decolonization of Africa
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Frederick Cooper
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History

Frederick Cooper is a Professor of History at NYU. His interests include slavery and labor in the 19th- and 20-th century East Africa, the shifting nature of colonial thinking and practices, and the relationship of social change and conflict to decolonization in French and British Africa. His work seeks to counter both the national and the modern bars of most historical studies through the study of empires.

Friday, January 27

Erotic Encounters of an Extra Judicial Kind: The Liminal Worlds of Law and Crime in Indian Cinema
Imagining the Future in India at 70 Speaker Series
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Lawrence Liang
Location:
501 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Film Studies Program, School of Law, Department of English, Cultural Studies Program and Humanities Center

Lawrence Liang is a professor of Law at Ambedkar University and currently Rice Scholar at Yale University. He co-founded Alternative Law Forum (ALF), a public interest and human rights lawyering group in Bangalore with whom he worked for fifteen years. ALF has engaged in strategic litigation on various socio-legal issues, and Liang's work lies at the intersection of law, technology, and culture. He is a member of the Kafila collective and a co-founder of two online video archives: indiancine.ma and pad.ma

Respondents: Jinying Li (Film Studies) and Michael Madison (School of Law)

Saturday, January 28

2017 Lunar New Year Celebration
Time:
5:00 pm
Location:
William Pitt Union Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Pitt's Chinese American Students Association and Vietnamese Student Association invite you to join us at our 2017 Lunar New Year Celebration!

Lunar New Year is a traditional holiday celebrated in many parts of East Asia, including China and Vietnam. Also known as Chinese New Year and Tết, it is the longest and one of the most extravagant holidays celebrated in East Asia. Come out to learn more about and celebrate the Year of the Rooster with diverse performances, FREE food, and cultural games/activities!

(There will be OCC credit for all Pitt students)

Monday, January 30

History as Politics: Coming to Terms with the Past in Post-Soviet Latvia
Geschichte als Politikum: Lettland und die Aufarbeitung nach der Diktatur
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Katja Wezel, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall, History Department Lounge
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History

History as Politics: Coming to Terms with the Past in Post-Soviet Latvia (Geschichte als Politikum: Lettland und die Aufarbeitung nach der Diktatur) explores post-Communist Latvia, a restored independent state, which emerged from the ashes of the Soviet Union facing a range of challenges. The Soviet period had transformed the region, leaving sizeable Russian-speaking minorities in the Baltic states. As Latvia sought membership in the European Union and NATO, its treatment of national minorities came into the spotlight, viewed as inter-ethnic conflict by international observers. However, the book argues that at the core of the conflict were not so much ethnic tensions but instead diverging historical perceptions. Free speech and post-Soviet democratization unleashed conflicting historical narratives from the different ethnic groups, resulting in fierce debates about World War II and its aftermath.

The discussion of this book will be in English, and will feature commentary by:
John Connelly, University of California, Berkeley
Randall Halle, University of Pittsburgh

Reception to follow.

Tuesday, January 31

Spiritan Engagement with Africa:
1841 to the Present
Time:
4:00 pm
Location:
Africa Room, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Wednesday, February 1

The Changing Spiritan Presence and Contemporary Issues in Africa
Time:
10:00 am
Location:
Union Ballroom, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Implications for Duquesne’s Engagement and Strategic Initiatives with and in Africa
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
Union Ballroom, Duquesne University
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Duquesne University's Center for African Studies

Engaging Africa: Spiritan Traditions, Contemporary Perspectives

An inaugural transdisciplinary African studies conference to present historical information about Spiritan missions in Africa and how such understandings help Duquesne University’s mission and vision in engaging Africa.

Free and open to the public. Go to duq.edu/cas for more information!

Friday, February 3

Commissioning Truths: Latin America's impact on the right to truth
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Robin Kirk (Faculty Co-Chair of the Executive Committee of the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute)
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

Argentina published its "Never Again" (Nunca Más) report on atrocities committed by the security forces against the civilian population on September 20, 1984. Researched and written by the government-sanctioned National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons (Comisión Nacional sobre la Desaparición de Personas, CONADEP), the report drew on over 50,000 pages collected by researchers who traveled across Argentina and the world to interview survivors and collect evidence. I argue that this is a kind of beginning to the push for what is now recognized as a universal right to truth.

The emphasis in “Never Again” on fact-collection, accountability and memory have inspired human rights interventions in places as different as South Africa, where the Truth and Reconciliation Commission helped ease a transfer to democracy from apartheid; and Greensboro, North Carolina, site of the first US-based commission. 
She is the editor of Commissioning Truths: Essays on the 30th Anniversary of Nunca Más, an e-book published by the DHRC@FHI as well as an author of several books about Latin America.

Lunch will be provided.
For more information: lavst12@pitt.edu
www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas

Striving in Excess: Remaking Persons and Objects in India's New Athletic Cultures
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Anthropologists often claim sports matter because they are metaphors for society. But how do we account for the sensuous excesses of physical cultures—the feelings of movement, pleasure, pain, love and fatigue, as well as the sense of aspiration, experimentation and striving that accompany them?

While conducting research on the world of cycling in India, I was struck by the immense popularity of a particular form of riding called randonneuring. These endurance rides, which cyclists describe as “races against yourself,” have become a central frame of reference. Do these endurance cyclists reflect something changing in India: new notions of the body, of self-care, leisure or work?

However, I argue that beyond a sign of some larger social structure, endurance cycling offers something as an extreme. Endurance cyclists in India show that in the struggle to push beyond the boundaries of one's body, there are moments of loss of control; that seemingly contained and internally-oriented sense self-improvement—is redefined as unruly, undisciplined and having the potential to transform the relationship of the self to others.

Author biography:
Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria is assistant professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. He is author of The Slow Boil: Street Food, Public Space and Rights in Mumbai (Stanford, 2016). He has also co-edited, with Colin McFarlane, the book Urban Navigations: Politics, Space and the City in South Asia (Routledge, 2011). For over a decade he has researched the politics of public space in Mumbai. He is currently working on a project examining the cultural life of the bicycle in South Asia.

Monday, February 6 to Friday, February 17

‘The Great War in Great Outlines’
Exhibition
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Join us for an exhibition sponsored by the Belgium Embassy entitled ‘The Great War in Great Outlines.'

Monday, February 6

Hot Metal Empire
Type Design, Media, and Empire in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Tom Mullaney, Stanford University
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History

Beginning at the turn of the twentieth century, hot metal typesetting swept through newspaper plants and government printing offices across the United States and Europe – and soon through Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. With missionary-like zeal reminiscent of the Propaganda Fide, and a hunger for lucrative new markets, the manufacturing giant Mergenthaler Linotype and its European licensees carved up the world of script along already lines of empire, colonialism, and the rising power of the United States. Soon, letterform artists and sales representatives in Brooklyn and London found themselves trafficking in Arabic, Armenian, Burmese, Devanagari, Hebrew, Korean, Mongolian, Siamese, and over one hundred other world scripts — scripts once referred to as “Exotic Type,” but now re-cast in the novel term “Non-Latin.” In this talk, Thomas S. Mullaney charts out the global history of this “Hot Metal Empire,” examining the relationship between non-Latin type design, media, and colonialism in the age of modern empire, industrialized production, New Imperialism, and the aftermath of the First World War.

Thursday, February 9

The Discussion of Peacekeeping in the Middle East
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Dennis Jett
Location:
4217 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Professor Jett, author of American Ambassadors, Why Peacekeeping Fails, and Why American Foreign Policy Fails, will describe the current status of four peacekeeping operations in the Middle East and why, despite their $700 million annual cost, they are actually accomplishing very little. He will also discuss why it is nonetheless impossible to shut them down and how peacekeeping will be unable to make any contribution to a possible peace settlement between Israelis and Palestinians.

The Quiet Rise of Heavy Metal in Africa
Let's Talk Africa
Time:
12:30 pm to 2:30 pm
Presenter:
Edward Banchs
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Join the African Studies Program and Edward Banchs, author of Heavy Metal Africa: Life, Passion, and Heavy Metal in the Forgotten Continent for a look at how rock and heavy metal music has become the voice of many in Africa, as well as how identity, culture, and life is being shaped by this music in the 'forgotten' continent.

Edward Banchs holds an MA in African Studies from the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies. His research on rock and metal in Africa has been featured in several publications, including The Guardian, O Globo, This Is Africa, and FactsMag. A lifelong metalhead, he lives in Pittsburgh, PA, where he is planning his next African adventure.

Lunch will be provided!

The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Jeffery R. Webber
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

This talk will explain the political dynamics and conflicts underpinning the contradictory evolution of left-wing governments and social movements in Latin America in the last two decades. Throughout the 2000s, Latin America transformed itself into the leading edge of anti-neoliberal resistance in the world. What is left of the Pink Tide today? What is the governments' relationship to the explosive social movements that propelled them to power? As China's demand slackens for Latin American commodities, will they continue to rely on natural resource extraction? This talk is grounded in an analysis of trends in capitalist accumulation from 1990 to 2015, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Venezuela.

It explains inequality there today through a decolonial Marxist framework, rooted in a new understanding of class and its complex associations with racial and gender oppression. The talk will also cover indigenous and peasant resistance to the expansion of private mining, agro-industry and natural gas and oil activities. Finally, the presentation will conclude with remarks on "passive revolution" in Bolivia under Evo Morales and debates around dual power and class composition during the era of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela.

Jeffery R. Webber is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same, Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia, and From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia: Class Struggle, Indigenous Liberation, and the Politics of Evo Morales.

Refreshments will be provided.
For more information: lavst12@pitt.edu

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas

Friday, February 10

How to Misunderstand Central Asian Islam (and How to Do Better)
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Morgan Liu, Ohio State University professor
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Morgan Liu is a cultural anthropologist studying Islamic knowledge and practice in post-Soviet Central Asia, focusing on Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. He is interested in ethnographic approaches to the state, postsocialism, space, and agency. Liu takes a comparative look at notions of just society across the Middle East, Russia, and Asia.

Thursday, February 16 to Friday, February 17

Career Networking Trip to Washington DC
For Pitt Undergraduates
Time:
7:00 am to 8:30 pm
Location:
Washington, DC
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Students will meet with experts and alumni in various fields in order to learn about different careers and gain an insider's perspective on the different organizations. Students will participate in one of the four tracks:
* Global Health and Development
* Diplomacy and Security
* International Development and Education
* Human Rights and Refugees

Along with meetings at consulting firms, think tanks, non-profits, government agencies there will be a reception to meet center alumni. A total of 44 students will be selected to go (from 4 participating UCIS centers.)

**Students must apply by noon January 20, 2017.**

Thursday, February 16

“Son of Saul” and New Perspectives on the Shoah
Time:
2:00 pm
Location:
O’Hara Student Center Dining Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

“Winner of the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar and Golden Globe, Son of Saul is Hungarian director László Nemes’ blistering debut feature, a courageous and unflinching reimagining of the Holocaust drama. Saul Ausländer is a member of the Sonderkommando, the Jewish prisoners forced to assist in the machinery of the Nazi concentration camps. While at work, he discovers the body of a boy he recognises as his son. As the Sonderkommando plan a rebellion, Saul vows to carry out an impossible task: to save the child’s body from the flames and to find a rabbi to recite the mourner’s Kaddish and offer the boy a proper burial. Anchored by a riveting and intensely brave performance from newcomer Géza Röhrig, Son of Saul is a remarkable exploration of one of humanity’s darkest moments. Visceral, gripping and immensely powerful, it is one of the boldest and most remarkable debuts in recent memory - and is already being heralded as a masterpiece of world cinema.” Source: Curzon Artificial Eye

Salt Assault: Towards an Aesthetic of the Ambulatory
As part of the Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human Lecture Series
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Sumathi Ramaswamy
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with The Humanities Center

Sumatra Ramaswamy is Professor of History at Duke University. She is a cultural historian of South Asia and the British Empire and her research over the last few years has been largely in the areas of visual studies, the history of cartography, and gender. She is also pursing new research on the cultures of learning in colonial and postcolonial India.

Friday, February 17

Diversity in Global Business
As part of the Year in Diversity
Time:
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Location:
270 Mervis Hall (Colloquium Room)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with International Business Center
Contact:
Jacqueline Saslawski
Contact Email:
jsaslawski@katz.pitt.edu

What is Diversity in Global Business?
The International Business Center and the Global Studies Center are hosting a panel series for the Year of Diversity at Pitt. This series is supported by a grant from Pitt's Provost Office. The second of three panels held on Jan. 20 will focus on “Managing Diversity in Global Business”
Experts in the field of international human resources and workplace mobility along with administrators that recruit or advise diverse student populations will discuss how to manage international cultures and different perspectives, genders, ages, and religions during the students' time at the University of Pittsburgh and in their future career.
Refreshments will be provided.

Unruly Futurities: Temporality, Scale, and Speculation in Modi's Statue of Unity
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Kajri Jain
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Monday, February 20

Surrogate Settlers:
Africans as Colonists in the Sixteenth-Century Iberian Atlantic World
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. David Wheat
Location:
3702 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Tuesday, February 21

Conversations on Europe: Transgender Europe
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact:
Ashley DiGregorio
Contact Email:
aad87@pitt.edu

Thursday, February 23 to Sunday, February 26

2017 National Model African Union Conference
Time:
7:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
Howard University
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Howard University in collaboration with the African Union Mission in Washington, D.C. and Member State Embassies sponsors an annual simulation of the African Union, the regional organization of African states, in the form of a Model African Union Conference. Celebrating thirty-seven years of simulation of the OAU and now AU, the 15th Annual National Model African Union Conference is scheduled for February 23-26, 2017.

Friday, February 24

Sharing Food and Words
The African and Africana Research Experience
Time:
2:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Cup n Chaucer, Hillman Library
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with University Library System (ULS) and Africana Studies Department

This event will provide a forum for discussion on doing research and writing about Africa and the African Diaspora. It is a great opportunity for students already doing research or wishing to begin doing research on Africa and the African Diaspora to learn about various approaches, and resources available at Pitt. Faculty and student presenters will lead the discussions based on their own research experiences from diverse disciplines and viewpoints. They will focus on the opportunities and challenges of doing research related to Africa and the African Diaspora, while also discussing the importance of diversity in research to allow for traditionally underrepresented groups to become active participants in doing research and getting their work published. The goal is to encourage Africanist faculty and students interested in doing research to engage in conversations that involve different viewpoints, and help them develop a wide range of research methods and skills while also learning about optional resources available to them. The conversations will happen over sharing food from Africa (Ethiopia, Congo and northern Africa).

Futurities at the Border
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Bhaskar Sarkar
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Friday, February 24 to Saturday, February 25

2017 Undergraduate Model EU
Time:
6:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Duquesne University
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact:
Kathy Ayers
Contact Phone:
412-624-3503
Contact Email:
kma69@pitt.edu

The Undergraduate Model European Union is an annual event that gives students a chance to learn about the workings of the European Union through preparation for and participation in a hands-on two-day simulation. Model EU enhances students’ understanding of the issues and challenges facing the 28 member nations of the EU. Awards will be given to the most effective delegations and best individual position papers.

This year's competition will host universities from across the region and will take place on Duquesne University’s campus.

To register your school now to go: http://tinyurl.com/2017-UMEU.

Monday, February 27

Afro-Latin America:
Black Lives, 1600-2000
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Reid Andrews
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Tuesday, February 28

Latin American in Motion:
Pitt Latin American Films
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Public Health G23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Deaprtment of Hispanic Languages & Literatures, the Year of DIVERSITY at the University of Pittsburgh and Spanish Film Club
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh
present
Latin America in Motion: Pitt Latin American Films

All Films will be screened at 7:00 p.m.
Public Health G23
130 De Soto St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(corner of 5th ave, and De Soto St.)

Come and join us for a film and pizza!

Free and open to the public!

Films:

OPEN CAGE
(Mexico)
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

THE SECOND MOTHER
(Brazil)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

THE CLUB
(Chile)
TUESDAY, MARCH 14

THE TRAVEL AGENT
(Cuba)
TUESDAY, MARCH 21

IXCANUL
(Guatemala)
TUESDAY, APRIL 4

All films are subtitled.

Thursday, March 2

The Politics of Imagining Asia in the Americas
The Global Contours of Orientalism and Yellow Peril in Early 20th Century Peru
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Ana Candela
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Wednesday, March 8

2017 Euro Challenge Competition
Time:
8:30 am to 2:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Kathy Ayers
Contact Phone:
412-624-3503
Contact Email:
kma69@pitt.edu

The Euro Challenge is a national competition for cash prizes where 9th and 10th grade high school students test their knowledge and understanding of the European economy and the Euro, the currency shared by many of the 28 countries of the European Union.

Monday, March 13

Buying Time:
Debt and Mobility in the Western Indian Ocean
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Thomas McDow
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Tuesday, March 14

Latin American in Motion:
Pitt Latin American Films
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Public Health G23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Deaprtment of Hispanic Languages & Literatures, and the Year of Diversity at the University of Pittsburgh and Spanish Film Club by Pragda
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh
present
Latin America in Motion: Pitt Latin American Films

All Films will be screened at 7:00 p.m.
Public Health G23
130 De Soto St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(corner of 5th ave, and De Soto St.)

Come and join us for a film and pizza!

Free and open to the public!

Films:

OPEN CAGE
(Mexico)
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

THE SECOND MOTHER
(Brazil)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

THE CLUB
(Chile)
TUESDAY, MARCH 14

THE TRAVEL AGENT
(Cuba)
TUESDAY, MARCH 21

IXCANUL
(Guatemala)
TUESDAY, APRIL 4

All films are subtitled.

Thursday, March 16 to Saturday, March 18

A Diversity of (European) Identities: From the Subnational to the Supranational
Time:
(All day)
Sponsored by:
Director's Office, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and European Union Studies Association along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Phone:
4126487405
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

This two-day conference will bring together scholars from across sub-fields to discuss identity in the European context. We will focus on the development, transformation, transmission, expression, and politicization of three types of identity – subnational, national, and European – and how these identities overlap with each other. Panels will be organized around these three identities and focus on one of the thematic areas. As an interdisiciplinary conference, participants will be drawn from across the humanities, social sciences, and professional fields. Participants will come from across the disciplines at Pitt, other universities in the region, universities in the US and in Europe. Confirmed keynote speakers include Monserrat Guibernau (Sociology, University of Cambridge) and Matthew Goodwin (Politics and International Relations, University of Kent, UK).

Tuesday, March 21

Conversations on Europe- The Dutch Bellweather: What is the Forecast for a "Nexit" or "Frexit"?
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact:
Ashley DiGregorio
Contact Email:
aad87@pitt.edu
The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma & the Silk Road Ensemble
Time:
5:00 pm
Location:
TBD
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

Blending performance footage, personal interviews, and archival film, director Morgan Neville, and producer, Caitrin Rogers, focus on the journeys of a small group of Silk Road Ensemble mainstays from across the globe to create an intensely personal chronicle of passion, talent, and sacrifice. Through these moving individual stories, the filmmakers paint a vivid portrait of a bold musical experiment and a global search for the ties that bind.

Latin American in Motion:
Pitt Latin American Films
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Public Health G23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, and the Year of Diversity at the University of Pittsburgh and Spanish Film Club by Pragda
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh
present
Latin America in Motion: Pitt Latin American Films

All Films will be screened at 7:00 p.m.
Public Health G23
130 De Soto St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(corner of 5th ave, and De Soto St.)

Come and join us for a film and pizza!

Free and open to the public!

Films:

OPEN CAGE
(Mexico)
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

THE SECOND MOTHER
(Brazil)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

THE CLUB
(Chile)
TUESDAY, MARCH 14

THE TRAVEL AGENT
(Cuba)
TUESDAY, MARCH 21

IXCANUL
(Guatemala)
TUESDAY, APRIL 4

All films are subtitled.

Thursday, March 23

Model African Union
Time:
7:30 am to 4:30 pm
Location:
O'Hara Student Center and the University Club
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Student Participants are sponsored by the ASP
Contact:
Katherine Mooney
Contact Phone:
412-648-1802
Contact Email:
africanstudies@pitt.edu

We are proud to announce the 6th Annual Model African Union for high school students! This unique experiences provides students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to research and represent a given African country's interest in Parliamentary-style proceedings! This event is one of only a handful of high school African Union simulations in the country! Additionally, we provide a light breakfast and African lunch for all students. We also provide African entertainment during lunch. Finally, We do not charge any fees for schools to participate.

With 13 schools and over 165 students having participated last year, this event continues to grow and evolve. Join us!

If you are a teacher and have interested students, or if you are a university student and are interested in volunteering, please email africanstudies@pitt.edu.

Reframing Political Subjectivity:Inter-Imperial World, Interdisciplinary Method
As part of the Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human Lecture Series
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Laura Doyla
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with The Humanities Center

Laura Doyla is Professor of English at UMass Amherst. Her research explores the dynamic intercultural formation of literary texts: the ways that they are written and read within an uneven, volatile, geopolitical field of relations; the ways that literary genres and traditions often intimate the long history of these writing conditions; and the ways authors and readers imagine positions at odds with the geopolitical field.

Friday, March 24

The "other Great Game
The Opening of Korea and The Birth of the Modern East Asia
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Sheila Miyoshi Jager
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Monday, March 27

Afro-Atlantic Discourses in the Age of Revolution
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Michele Reid-Vasquez
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of History Department

Thursday, March 30 to Saturday, April 1

Faculty Research Workshop: Marriage Equality in Advanced Industrialized Democracies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Helma de Vries-Jordan, University of Pittsburgh - Bradford (faculty organizer)
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Office of the Provost and European Union
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Phone:
624-5404
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Marriage equality movements in advanced industrialized democracies have been remarkably successful in achieving policy change. From 2001 to 2016, marriage equality has been achieved in nearly two dozen states. Since many of these victories occurred in Europe, North America, and Oceania, it is timely to organize a conference in which scholars and participants can explore how marriage equality is impacting the future of LGBTQ rights. The pathways to marriage equality have been incredibly varied, including legislation, litigation, and referendums. Moreover, marriage equality has been achieved across a broad range of institutional climates, from parliamentary to presidential systems and from federal to unitary states. The increasingly transnational networks of activists working to advance marriage equality may have contributed to the policy diffusion of marriage equality. Despite the extension of marriage equality, the LGBTQ community continues to experience discrimination and harassment, and in some states, legal protections regarding non-discrimination, parenting, or gender recognition are inadequate.

The faculty research workshop on marriage equality in advanced industrialized democracies will be held from March 30th to April 1st, 2017, at the University of Pittsburgh. This international conference is organized by Professor Helma de Vries-Jordan, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Law, under the leadership of the European Studies Center and Jean Monnet European Union Centre of Excellence. The workshop integrates social movements scholarship concerning marriage equality, other LGBTQ rights, and gender equality, placing them in comparative and international perspective. The conference will bring together some of the leading scholars in this field, presenting papers and engaging in dialogue about future directions for scholarship, with the goal of promoting collaborations between scholars and interactions amongst conference participants which will include faculty, students, and community members.

The conference will examine the factors that have influenced marriage equality movements and relevant LGBTQ rights policy-making, both in states with marriage equality and in states with ongoing campaigns. Causal factors that may be explored include dynamics in the political opportunity structure, identity-based versus strategic framing of issues, diffusion of norms regarding LGBTQ rights, and networking of activists. We will explore a number of central debates regarding the impact of marriage equality on the future of LGBTQ rights and regarding the transnational social movements working to advance gender and sexual equality. Questions will include: How has marriage equality impacted or been influenced by progress on other LGBTQ rights issues, or has marriage equality contributed to backlash or delays in achieving other rights? How have marriage equality movements’ level of inclusiveness regarding sexual and gender minorities impacted their advocacy and post-marriage equality policy outcomes? Finally, how portable are the strategies, frames, resources, and networks of activists across borders, and how has cooperation or conflict between activists across borders influenced these movements?

Thursday, March 30

Distant Reading and Modern Japanese Literature
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Hoyt Long
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Monday, April 3

Natural and Unnatural Disasters
3/11, Asbestos, and the Unmaking of Japan's Modern World
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Brett Walker
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Tuesday, April 4

Latin American in Motion:
Pitt Latin American Films
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
Public Health G23
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, and the Year of Diversity at the University of Pittsburgh and Spanish Film Club by Pragda
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Luz Amanda Hank
Contact Phone:
412-648-7391
Contact Email:
lavst12@pitt.edu

The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Hispanic Languages & Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh
present
Latin America in Motion: Pitt Latin American Films

All Films will be screened at 7:00 p.m.
Public Health G23
130 De Soto St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(corner of 5th ave, and De Soto St.)

Come and join us for a film and pizza!

Free and open to the public!

Films:

OPEN CAGE
(Mexico)
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

THE SECOND MOTHER
(Brazil)
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

THE CLUB
(Chile)
TUESDAY, MARCH 14

THE TRAVEL AGENT
(Cuba)
TUESDAY, MARCH 21

IXCANUL
(Guatemala)
TUESDAY, APRIL 4

All films are subtitled.

Friday, April 7

European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2017
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Contact:
Gina Peirce
Contact Phone:
4126482290
Contact Email:
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The Undergraduate Research Symposium (formerly "Europe: East and West") is an annual event since 2002 designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants are grouped into panels according to their research topics and will give 10- to 15-minute presentations to a panel of faculty and graduate students. Presentations are open to the public.

Diversity in Global Business
As part of the Year in Diversity
Time:
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Location:
270 Mervis Hall (Colloquium Room)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with International Business Center
Contact:
Jacqueline Saslawski
Contact Email:
jsaslawski@katz.pitt.edu

What is Diversity in Global Business?
The International Business Center and the Global Studies Center are hosting a panel series for the Year of Diversity at Pitt. This series is supported by a grant from Pitt's Provost Office. The last of the three panels will focus on “Diversity and Multiculturalism Beyond the US”
This panel will feature student and alumni discussants who will share their experiences based on their diverse and "non-diverse" backgrounds, including their national, religious, and gender affiliations. The panelists will explore issues such as whether diverse teams perform better, what expectations and understanding international students hold concerning diversity in the U.S., as well as how studying and working with diverse students and colleagues enriches the "non-diverse" person.
Refreshments will be provided.

Imagining the Future in India at 70
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Akhil Gupta
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Tuesday, April 11

Conversations on Europe- Portuguese Identity: Iberia, Europe, and the World (In Portuguese)
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact:
Ashley DiGregorio
Contact Email:
aad87@pitt.edu

Friday, April 14

The Islamic Practices that Shape Uyghur Nationalism
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Rian Thum, Associate Professor of History at Loyola University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Rian Thum’s research and teaching are generally concerned with the overlap of China and the Muslim World. He argues that the Uyghurs - and their place in China today - can only be understood in the light of longstanding traditions of local pilgrimage and manuscript culture.

Friday, April 28

UCIS Graduation Ceremony
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom A, University Club
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

Wednesday, May 3

Conversations on Europe: Transatlantic Relations After the First 100 Days
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence