Events

UCIS Event Listings | UCIS Central Calendar

Monday, March 30

From Qing to ¥uan: A China symposium in honor of Evelyn and Thomas Rawski
Time:
2:30 pm
Presenter:
Loren Brandt, Pierre F. Landry, Susan Naquin
Location:
Alcoa Room, School of Law
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center along with Department of History and Department of Economics
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

Pierre F. Landry, University of Pittsburgh
Loren Brandt, University of Toronto
Susan Naquin, Princeton University

Tuesday, March 31

Folklore, Gender, and AIDS in Malawi
No Secret Under the Sun
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Professor Anika Wilson
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Department of Africana Studies and World History Center

Professor Anika Wilson of the Department of Africology, University of Wisconsin, will present a lecture on her book "Folklore, Gender, and AIDS in Malawi: No Secret Under the Sun."

Book Description: Informal folk narrative genres such as gossip, advice, rumor, and urban legends provide a unique lens through which to discern popular formations of gender conflict and AIDS beliefs. This is the first book on AIDS and gender in Africa to draw primarily on such narratives. By exploring tales of love medicine, gossip about romantic rivalries, rumors of mysterious new diseases, marital advice, and stories of rape, among others, it provides rich, personally grounded insights into the everyday struggles of people living in an era marked by social upheaval.

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact Katie Jones, joneskh@pitt.edu or 412-624-3073

Wednesday, April 1

Placeholder INPAC Event
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Rachel Jacobson
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Indo-Pacific Council along with Department of Music
Contact:
Rachel Jacobson
Contact Phone:
412-648-7370
Contact Email:
rej16@pitt.edu

This placeholder event is created to demonstrate how it would look to display only INPAC events on a page within the Asian Studies Center website.

Life After Peace Corps
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Learn what occupations returned Peace Corps Volunteers pursued after their service. A panel of professionals from a variety of backgrounds and fields will tell their stories about how their Peace Corps service impacted and shaped their career path. Prominent leaders in Pittsburgh will be part of the panel - you won't want to miss this!
Lunch will be provided.

War, Grief and Rage: Popular Commemorations of the Maidan
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Catherine Wanner, History and Cultural Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies

When over one hundred people died during a night of violence on the Maidan, Kyiv’s central square, on February 20, 2014, memorial shrines commemorating the tragic deaths sprang up immediately. By creating sacred commemorative space, the surviving protesters created a means and a place for grieving. These popular memorials and the rites of mourning performed there not only commemorate death and sacrifice, they also focus outrage. As such, the memorials cultivate deeply felt moral sentiments of loss, mourning and grieving that feed the conviction that the protests were more than a political act. They constituted a “revolution of dignity.”

Catherine Wanner is a Professor of History and Cultural Anthropology at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her doctorate in cultural anthropology from Columbia University. She is the author of Burden of Dreams: History and Identity in Post-Soviet Ukraine (1998), Communities of the Converted: Ukrainians and Global Evangelism (2007), which won four best book prizes and was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title, and co-editor of Religion, Morality and Community in Post-Soviet Societies (2008), editor of State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine (2012) and editor of a forthcoming collection of essays on resistance and renewal during the Maidan protests. She is currently working a book entitled, The Winter that Changed Us: Religion, Faith and Belonging in Russia and Ukraine. Her research has been supported by awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council among others.

Thursday, April 2

African Studies Graduating Student Presentation
Time:
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact:
Eric Swetts
Contact Email:
ems137@pitt.edu

Join us for presentations by our graduating students, who will share their experiences, research, and how the African Studies Certificate Program has impacted their lives thus far and looking forward! Pizza will be provided!

Careers in International Media & Communications
International Career Toolkit Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center and Study Abroad Office
Contact:
Sarah Angel Markwardt
Contact Email:
saa133@pitt.edu

Are you interested in global issues?
Join us Thursday, April 2nd at 3:00pm in 4217 Posvar to discuss careers in international media and communications with alumni and professionals working internationally.

Discover career opportunities for students in all fields of study.
 
Network with alumni and professionals in the field.

Constellation and Flow: How Citizenship Captures Capital Flight
Time:
5:30 pm
Presenter:
Aiwha Ong
Location:
324 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

The Pitt Graduate Program for Cultural Studies' Annual Distinguished Lecturer will be Aiwha Ong, Professor of the Socio-Cultural Anthropology and Southeast Asian Studies, University of California Berkeley, whose talk is entitled, "Constellation and Flow: How Citizenship Captures Capital Flight." She is the author of Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist discipline: Factory Women in Malaysia (1987); Flexible Citizenship: the Cultural Logics of Transnationality (1999); Buddha in Hiding: Refugees, Citizenship, the New America (2003); and Neoliberalism as Exception: Mutations in Citizenship and Sovereignty (2006). She also co-edited Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics and Ethics as Anthropological Problems (2005); and Privatizing China, Socialism from Afar (2008). Her latest collection is Asian Biotech: Ethics and Communities of Fate. She will deliver her lecture on April 2nd from 5:30 to 7:30 pm in 324 Cathedral of Learning. She will be introduced by Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Asian Studies Center Nicole Constable. Professors Miller and Fernandes will respond. A small reception outside the hall will precede the lecture at 5pm.

Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers' Series: Peter Hessler
Time:
8:30 pm
Presenter:
Peter Heslsler, 2014/15 William Block Sr. Award Winner
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series and University Store on Fifth
Contact Phone:
412-624-6508

Peter Hessler has received the 2008 National Magazine Award for Excellence in Reporting, a 2011 Macarthur Fellowship, and the 2001 Kiriyama Prize. He is the author of River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze; Country Driving: A Chinese Road Trip; Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West; and Oracle Bones: A Journey through Time in China, a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award. He is a contributing writer for National Geographic and a staff writer at The New Yorker, for which he has served as the Beijing, China correspondent from 2000 to 2007 and currently covers Egypt.

Friday, April 3

XI Undergraduate Research Symposium on Latin America and the Caribbean
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Slippery Rock University
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Hispanic Language and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. and Department of Modern Languages & Cultures at Slippery Rock University
Contact:
Dr. Ana María Caula
Contact Email:
latinundergrad@sru.edu

Present your research with other undergraduate students on any topic related to Latin American Studies in literature, linguistics, art, or professional academic disciplines.
Submit a 150-200 word abstract to the following e-mail address: (latinundergrad@sru.edu) Deadline for submissions: Friday, March 6, 2015.

Presentations will be made in Spanish, Portuguese, and English.

When the Rainbow is not Enuf
Activism & the Everyday in London's Black Gay and Lesbian Activist Ephemera
Time:
10:00 am
Presenter:
Dominique Johnson
Location:
402 Cathedral of learning
Announced by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence on behalf of
In the Shadow of Working Men: Gendered Labor and Migrant Rights in South Korea
Part of the Worlding Korea Lecture Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Hae Yeon Choo
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

This talk will investigate the gendered production of migrant rights by examining two groups of Filipina women in South Korea: factory workers and hostesses at American military camptown clubs. Based on ethnographic research, I identify two distinct labor regimes for migrant women that were differently shaped in the shadow of working men. Divergent forms of civil society mobilization in South Korea sustained these regimes: migrant factory workers received recognition as workers without attention to gender-specific concerns while hostesses were construed as women victims in need of protection. Thus, Filipina factory workers were able to exercise greater labor and social rights by sharing the dignity of workers as a basis for their rights claims from which hostesses were excluded. Emphasizing gendered labor processes and symbolic politics, this talk will offer an analytical framework to interrogate the mechanisms through which a discrepancy of rights is generated at the intersection of workplace organization and civil society mobilization.

Hae Yeon Choo is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research centers on gender, migration, and citizenship. Her interest in using intersectional analysis informs her articles in Sociological Theory, Gender & Society, and positions: asia critique. Her book manuscript The Margins of Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (under contract with Stanford University Press) examines how inequalities of gender, race, and class affect migrant rights through a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea—factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and club hostesses. She has also translated Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

Tuesday, April 7

New Trends in China Business
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
David Iwinski
Location:
Mervis 209
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and International Business Center

David Iwinski Jr. is the Managing Director of Blue Water Growth LLC, a firm that is focused on assisting cross border mergers and acquisitions between Asia and North America and also assisting North American firms in developing growth and markets in Asia. In 1988 he earned a Juris Doctor from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and has worked in international business management in Asia and Europe for over 27 years.

Thursday, April 9 to Friday, April 10

15th Annual Policy Conference: Countering Violent Extremism in the United States and the European Union
Time:
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Faculty Organizer: Prof. Michael Kenney (GSPIA)
Location:
wentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and Ridgeway Center for Security Studies
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu

Countering violent extremism remains a critical security challenge confronting Western democratic societies. Policy makers face difficult questions about how to prevent their citizens from engaging in terrorism, what to do with citizens that seek to travel abroad to fight in “jihad,” and how to minimize the potential for violent attacks when fighters return to their countries of origin. Local communities also have an important role to play in countering violent extremism.

This conference addresses these challenges through an exchange of ideas and perspectives among researchers, practitioners and the public.

The conference is being organized under the leadership of Professor Michael Kenney, Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

*Registration is required. To register, please visit: tinyurl.com/kxteapk

Thursday, April 9

Let's Talk Africa!- Onyinyechi “Gandhi” Chukwunyere Esq.
Africa’s Paradox of Plenty: The Nigerian Example
Time:
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Presenter:
Onyinyechi “Gandhi” Chukwunyere Esq., MPIA, GSPIA
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact:
Eric Swetts
Contact Email:
ems137@pitt.edu

This presentation will explore the irony of Africa's poverty and underdevelopment in the midst of its vast mineral wealth. Using Nigeria - Africa's biggest economy and most populous country - as a case study, the topic will x-ray the probable nexus; identify the underlying sociopolitical and economic causes of the paradox often referenced as the 'resource curse'; and suggest policy options for reversing the trend.

About the Presenter: Onyinyechi 'Gandhi' Chukwunyere is a lawyer, rights advocate, researcher, and policy analyst. As president of the Legal Aid Group Nigeria, he was actively involved in the advocacy for efficient resource management, transparent leadership, and rapid socioeconomic development in Africa. He has done extensive work in Oil and Gas Law, Human Rights Law, and Illicit Financial Flows from Africa. He is currently working on a research proposal with the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pittsburgh on the United Nations' International Decade for People of African Descent. Also, he currently serves on the Welfare and Benefits Committee of the University Senate. He has a bachelor of laws degree from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, and Bar Certification from the Nigerian Law School; he is presently a candidate for the MPIA/IPE degree (2016) at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh.

Moving Captive Bodies: Unknown Women in the New Europe
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Anita Starosta
Location:
501 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Anita Starosta is the author of Form and Instability: Eastern Europe, Literature, Post-Imperial Difference (forthcoming from the Northwestern University Press), as well as articles in European and US publications (such as Intermédialités, Angelaki, and boundary 2) on translation, aesthetics, and epistemology all tested in the study of primarily

Eastern European writings. With Wlad Godzich, she co-edited the volume Second-Hand Europe, in which she interviewed Yuri Andrukhovych. Her next project considers translation as a lens on the contemporary global condition, examined through visual and print cultures, including problems of human rights and the situation of post-socialist Eastern Europe.

With a doctorate in History of Consciousness from the University of California, Santa Cruz, Dr. Starosta teaches 20th and 21st century literature, cultural theory, and visual culture at the Rhode Island School of Design; serves as an editor at boundary 2; and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University.

Friday, April 10

Vigilant Ethnicity: Korean Chinese Communist Party Members Encounter the Forbidden Homeland
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
June Hee Kwon
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Dr. Mi-Hyun Kim
Contact Phone:
412-624-5562
Contact Email:
kimmh@pitt.edu

Since China and South Korea normalized diplomatic relations in 1992, Korean Chinese, part of an officially recognized ethnic minority group in China, have migrated to Korea in search of both long-lost family members and better working opportunities. This massive and persistent migration to Korea is commonly called the Korean Wind. Based on ethnographic research in Yanbian, China, this paper examines how the ethnic politics of Korean Chinese Communist Party members have developed in response to the Korean Wind. South Korea was long been considered a forbidden capitalist enemy. How have these party members re-conceptualized their ties to South Korea, a relationship that was used as grounds for political persecution during the Cultural Revolution? How have they dealt with the economic affluence and cultural changes brought about by the Korean Wind over the last two decades? The elderly party members I interviewed exemplify a sharp split in the politics of ethnicity that distinguishes economic intention from political position—they are highly economized by the transnational migration to Korea while at the same time intensely politicized because of their tight identification with China as socialist subjects. I argue that the combination of economic need with a sense of multiple belonging is what constitutes and generates Korean Chinese as a vigilant ethnicity. This paper details the emergence of “Yanbian socialism,” a political nexus articulated between post- Cold War circumstances, post-socialist China, and neoliberal East Asia.

Yu Shiyuan's Wife Shields Her Mother-in-Law
The Stories Behind the Story
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Katherine Carlitz
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Katherine Carlitz
Contact Email:
kcarlitz@pitt.edu

Dr. Katherine Carlitz will share her research about the history of the Chinese cult of women's fidelity and chastity, namely the ideal wife's devotion to her mother-in-law. The wide currency of such devotion stories in Ming local histories has as much to do with late Yuan legal changes as with the traditions of filial piety per se. Song, Yuan, and Ming dynasty gazetteers, as well as legal materials, will be used to analyze the story of Yu Shiyuan's wife.

Saturday, April 11

2015 Annual CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium
Insight & Perspectives of Muslim Societies and Communities
Time:
(All day)
Location:
City View Cafe, Duquesne Union 6th Floor, Duquesne University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies and Duquesne University's Christian-Muslim Dialogue Committee

Call for papers and projects: www.cerisnet.org gives details on submissions of papers and abstracts.
We welcome projects on the five themes:
- Politics, policies, and social change
- Cultural and artistic representations
- Emerging economies and innovative technologies
- Theology, doctrine, and practice
- Muslims' relations with others of Abrahamic religions

Monday, April 13

2015 Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium
Global Eyes: Critical Perspectives of an Interconnected World
Time:
9:30 am to 4:00 pm
Location:
University of Pittsburgh, Rooms TBA
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and University of Pittsburgh Peace Corps Recruiter along with Global Studies at Penn State
Contact:
Elaine Linn, Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh
Contact Phone:
412 648-2113
Contact Email:
eel58@pitt.edu

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.

We encourage a wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.

Pitt’s Global Studies Center and the Global Studies Center at Penn State will host the event April 13, 2015. The symposium will include a keynote lecture, student presentations and student networking. Meals and round-trip transportation expenses from Penn State campuses are covered.

Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Global Studies Center’s website. Abstracts are due by February 27, 2015.

For more information on how to apply to the symposium, please visit: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/undergraduate-research-symposium

Tuesday, April 14

Before there was Ebola: European Responses to Diseases in Africa – Past and Present
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu

U.S. and European news coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted the urgency of the public health crisis, focusing often on the need to contain the outbreak to prevent its spread to “our shores.” Implicit (and often explicit) in these stories, however, were long-standing xenophobic and racialized attitudes toward African diseases that can be traced back to European imperial and pseudo-scientific ideas of the nineteenth century. This month’s Conversation will ask historians, political scientists, and public health experts to discuss the extent to which contemporary European and U.S. representations of Ebola borrowed from representations of earlier diseases occurring on the African continent and to speculate on the possible implications that such representations had and continue to have on mounting an effective response to an ongoing public health crisis. How much has news coverage contributed to what one political scientist described as the “long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place” and what can be done about it? Audience participation is welcome and encouraged.

Friday, April 17

Slavery and Abolition Research Symposium– A Symposium Honoring the Scholarship of Seymour Drescher, Distinguished University Professor, Department of History
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium & Cloisters
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence along with Department of History
Contact Email:
e=

Join the Department of History, the EUCE/ESC and the Center for Latin American Studies for a symposium honoring the scholarship of Professor Seymour Drescher. Invited speakers include David Eltis, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History Emeritus, Emory University; Stanley Engerman, John Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History, University of Rochester; Richard Huzzey, co-director Centre for the Study of International Slavery, University of Liverpool; and James Walvin, Professor of History Emeritus, University of York. A reception will follow the talk.

Japanese Conversation Table
Time:
4:00 pm
Location:
Room 316, Old Engineering Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Stephen Luft
Contact Email:
luft@pitt.edu

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures will be holding Japanese conversation tables at the dates listed below. We are looking for both native speakers and students of Japanese to attend. For native speakers, this is a great opportunity to get to know some American students. For students of Japanese, this is a great opportunity to practice your Japanese and meet some people from Japan! If you are looking for a language partner, this can be a good way to meet someone who is interested. If you have any questions about the Japanese conversation table, please contact Stephen Luft (luft@pitt.edu).

Thursday, May 14

Cultures Day at Harrold Middle School
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
African Studies Program
Location:
Harrold Middle School
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact Email:
AfricanStudies@pitt.edu

Are you interested in teaching 7-8 grade students about Africa? Please join us for our annual visit to Harrold Middle School as part of Cultures Day! This is an excellent volunteer opportunity and a great way to use your knowledge of Africa in a uniquely enriching way! The date is still TBD and will be updated when it is announced. Interested participants should email AfricanStudies@pitt.edu.

Date: Thursday, May 14, 2015

Monday, June 15 to Friday, July 3

Summer Seminar on Global Issues
Time:
9:00 am to 4:30 pm
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

We live in an interdependent world. No matter the career you’re considering, our changing world means that you will need to be globally fluent in order to compete and collaborate successfully in the future.

The Summer Seminar on Global Issues is designed to help students understand and think critically about their world—and the various issues, connections, and perspectives within it. Created for students entering their junior or senior year in high school, this three-week college preparatory summer learning opportunity focuses on both contemporary global issues and critical language skills. Through a mix of classroom instruction, experiential learning activities, and discussions with experts, participants will strengthen their understanding of overarching global issues and how these issues shape the world around them. Students will acquire greater global competence, cross-cultural understanding, and language proficiency—key skills needed to succeed in a global knowledge economy.

The Summer Seminar will be held June 15 - July 2, 2015 (Monday-Friday) at the University of Pittsburgh. Each day will run from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm. The program is sponsored by the World Affairs Council, and the Global Studies Center and the University Center for International Studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

Who can participate?
Rising high school juniors and seniors are encouraged to apply for this program.

How much does it cost?
The Summer Seminar is being offered at a subsidized rate of $750 per person for students in the Pittsburgh region.
Full and partial needs-based financial aid scholarships will be available.

Please note: Participants must bring a bag lunch each day. Students must also arrange for their own transportation.

What Can Participants Expect?
•Learn about a range of interdisciplinary global issues such as culture, diplomacy, the economy, the environment, human rights, and security.
•Acquire introductory skills in a critical world language (Arabic or Mandarin Chinese).
•Work with nationally and internationally ranked experts representing the academic, think tank, business, nonprofit, and government sectors on a range of global and regional issues.
•Develop 21st century skills including problem solving, analysis, and critical thinking.
•Participate in real-world scenarios and simulations.
•Work with fellow students to create an awareness project meant to share knowledge of global issues with others through a range of multimedia platforms.

Sample schedule
•9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.: Critical Language Study
•10:30 a.m. - Noon: Global Issues Course
•Noon - 1:00 p.m.: Lunch
•1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.: Experiential learning activities*

*A variety of supplemental activities will be incorporated into the Global Issues course instruction, and may include simulation exercises, discussions with expert speakers, and field trips.

How Can Students Apply?
To be considered for admission to the Summer Seminar on Global Issues, a student must submit an application and reference. For financial aid scholarships, a student must also complete a separate scholarship application form. Applications and reference forms must be submitted online or by mail.

Students can apply here: www.tinyurl.com/ssgi-2015
References can be completed here: www.tinyurl.com/2015-ssgi-reference
Application for Financial Assistance: download here

The application deadline is April 1, 2015.