Events

UCIS Event Listings | UCIS Central Calendar

Thursday, January 29

Euromaidan, Crimea and War with Russia: Why 2014 Will be Remembered in the Same Way as 1991
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Taras Kuzio, Senior Research Fellow, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies

Taras Kuzio received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, an MA in Soviet and Eastern European Studies from the University of London, a Phd from the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham, UK and was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Yale University. Currently a Toronto-based Senior Research Associate at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, Senior Fellow at the Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. Previously he has been a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan, and the School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, a Visiting Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University and Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. Taras Kuzio has been a long-term consultant on Ukrainian elections, democratisation and corruption to governments, political, legal and business clients. He is currently writing a book on Ukrainian regionalism, the Donbas and the separatist conflict and is the author and editor of fifteen books, including Ukraine: Democratisation, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (2015), Open Ukraine. Changing Course towards a European Future Democratic Revolution in Ukraine (2011), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007) and Ukraine-Crimea-Russia: Triangle of Conflict (2007) and has guest edited special issues of Communist and Post-Communist Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, East European Politics and Society, Nationalities Papers and Journal of Ukrainian Studies. He has authored over 100 think tank monographs, book chapters, and scholarly articles on post-communist and Ukrainian politics. As a public intellectual he has appeared on television and radio and extensively written on post-communist and Ukrainian politics for media and specialist publications Eurasia Daily Monitor, Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty, Financial Times, Al Jazeera, United Press International, and elsewhere.

Japanese Language Exchange in Shadyside
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
Kenmawr Apartments (401 Shady Ave., Pittsburgh, PA)
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of The Japan America Society of Pennsylvania

All skill levels welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

The Myth of McDonaldization: Globalization of Main Street in Japan
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Keith Brown
Location:
USX Building, Conference Room 33C12
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of

Observe more than half a century of change in Japan through photographs and stories. Dr. Keith Brown has been traveling to Mizusawa, a town in Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan, for 53 years.

Dr. Brown has captured the emergence of car culture and the evolution of agriculture from labor-intensive hand cultivated rice to capital-intensive highly mechanized agriculture. As in America, "Main Street" in the center of town has hollowed out as suburban big box stores have overtaken small shops.

But what does that mean for the lives of the farmers there? Has this Japanese town been "McDonaldized?" Join us for this free evening at the USX Building, Conference Room 33C12, from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m., January 29, 2015. Light hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be provided. Space is limited so please register by January 23 at http://www.us-japan.org/jasp/events.html.

Friday, January 30

VISUAL ORTHOGRAPHIC VARIATION AND LEARNING TO READ ACROSS WRITING SYSTEMS
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Li-Yun Chang, Instructor, Department of Applied Chinese Language and Culture, University of Pittsburgh
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Dr. Mi-Hyun Kim, Lecturer of Korean Language
Contact Phone:
412-624-5562
Contact Email:
kimmh@pitt.edu

Different writing systems are used across the world – their visual forms vary greatly. How can we classify this visual variation? Across the range of writing systems, how does variability in the visual characteristics of graphemes, the smallest linguistically significant writing units, in different orthographies (e.g., English: letters; Chinese: characters) affect learning to read? Specifically, do individuals with differing writing system backgrounds perceive graphemes differently? This talk focuses on research testing the hypothesis that more complex orthographies impose greater perceptual demands on learners, encouraging development of stronger visual perceptual skills through learning to read. Findings suggest that visual orthographic variation, encompassing both grapheme complexity and size of grapheme inventory, affects learning to read due to resulting differences in visual perceptual processing. Implications of this orthographic variation on Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) pedagogy are discussed. Light refreshments will be served.

From Persianate City-State to Russian Protectorate: Bukhara as a Center of Eurasian Exchange (1747-1917)
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
James Pickett
Location:
History Dept Lounge (3702 Posvar)
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of History

Friday, January 30 to Sunday, February 22

BRAHMAN/I: A One-Hijra Stand-Up Comedy Show
Time:
12:00 pm to 12:00 am
Presenter:
Aditi Brennan Kapil
Location:
Temple of Comedy, Quantum's pop-up club, 113 N. Pacific Avenue, one block off Penn Avenue in Garfield
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of UPMC
Contact Phone:
412-362-1713

In this charming play set as a stand-up comedy routine, the title character explores history, mythology, gender... and high school. Brahman/i – funny, cynical, inventive and intensely charismatic – takes on more than a dozen unforgettable characters in a fascinating life story that reveals observations of the world from adolescence to adulthood, and takes the audience on a voyage to answer the universal question, “Where do I fit in?” Brahman/i is a compelling and hilarious 90-minutes examining identity, curiosity, courage, and the assigned roles in which we often find ourselves trapped.

Staged in the heart of the Penn Avenue Corridor, a community center will be turned into a cheerfully raucous comedy club, complete with Kingfishers on the cabaret-style tables and Indian food hot from People's Indian Restaurant nearby.

Student tickets: $17

Monday, February 2

Vera Zolotareva and Xin Fanbin. The rise and fall of different careers in the Sino-Russian borderland
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Sören Urbansky
Location:
History Dept Lounge (3702 Posvar)
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of History
Diplomatic Reflections
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Christopher R. Hill, U.S. Ambassador, Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies the Matthew B. Ridgeway Center for International Security Studies World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

Christopher R. Hill is a highly regarded four-time former U.S. Ambassador. He will join us to reflect on his 30 plus years of experience in the Foreign Service dealing with complex issues in many of the world’s hotspots and offer insights concerning current foreign policy challenges and opportunities.

Ambassador Hill has recently published a memoir entitled Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy which recounts the opportunities and challenges, successes and failures, imperfect options, and outsize personalities he encountered as a Foreign Service officer. During his diplomatic career, he was the U.S. Ambassador to Macedonia, Poland, South Korea, and Iraq. Ambassador Hill also served as head of the U.S. delegation to the six-party disarmament talks with North Korea.

Ambassador Hill has been the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver since September 2010. He writes a monthly column for Project Syndicate, and is frequently called upon by the media to offer his views on international events and U.S. foreign policy. Ambassador Hill received the State Department’s Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis.

Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Ambassador Hill served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon. He graduated from Bowdoin College with a B.A. in Economics, and received a master’s degree from the U.S. Naval War College.

To register, please rsvp to sjp89@pitt.edu.

Tuesday, February 3

“The Greek Elections: Implications for Greece and for Europe”
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

In light of Greece’s quickly approaching parliament elections on January 25th, Political Science Professor, Dr. Despina Alexiadou, will introduce the actors and issues involved, and will weigh in on what the results will mean for Greece, for other possible austerity programs, and for Europe’s changing landscape.

Wednesday, February 4

‘When Peace is Made, You Will Again Be Free': Russo-Ottoman Conflict, Captives, and International Law
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Will Smiley
Location:
History Dept Lounge (3702 Posvar)
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of History

Thursday, February 5

The Price at the Pump: The Current Cost of Oil and the Global Economy
Panel discussion on the current fluidity of the oil market
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Global Studies Center

Why is there a drop in gas prices? What or who is behind it?What is the time frame and what should we expect in the future? How does it impacts policies in the US, Middle East, Russia and Nigeria?

Panel Presenters:
• Laura Paler, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh
• Daniel Berkowitz, Professor, Department of Economics, University of Pittsburgh
• Buba Misawa, Professor, Department of Political Science, Washington and Jefferson College

“The GMO Question in TTIP Negotiations”
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

In 2013, governments across the European Union (EU) gave the European Commission a mandate to negotiate the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the United States. Since July 2013, the two sides have held seven rounds of negotiations, but they have not yet reached an agreement. A motivating factor of TTIP is “regulatory convergence”, bringing American and European standards closer together to facilitate trade. One potential obstacle is the subject of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the context of food safety regulation. Approximately 70 percent of all processed food in American supermarkets contain GM ingredients, in contrast to the EU where GM food is severely restricted. This talk will review the regulatory differences between the two sides and how different approaches to GMO risk assessment create an obstacle to a TTIP agreement.

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Global Climate Politics: Paralysis Above and Movement Below
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Cindy Wiesner, Director of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by the Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change:
A 5-part video dialogue series with international ad local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of popular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Speaker: Cindy Wiesner, Director of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance

Suggested readings:
Davey, Melissa, Vaughn, Adam, and Amanda Holpuch (2014) “People’s Climate March – Thousands Around the World Demand Action – As It Happened” The Guardian. 21 September. Online: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/live/2014/sep/21/peoples-climate-...

The Guardian (2015) “The Guardian View on Paris 2015: the World’s Last Best Chance to Reach an Agreement on Cutting Carbon Emissions” 1 January. Online: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jan/01/guardian-view-paris...

Podesta, P.J. and Laura Smith (2014) “The Changing Face of Climate Change” Slate. 22 September. http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/09/people_...

More information on future sessions is available on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484.

Friday, February 6

The Africa Leadership Lecture Series
Africa's War on Poverty: Strides and Setbacks
Time:
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Presenter:
Ambassador Geoffrey Teneilable, Nigerian Consul-General Atlanta
Location:
O'Hara Student Center Ballroom
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Pan-African Graduate and Professional Student Union; Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership; Ford Institute for Human Security Union of African Communities of Southwestern Pennsylvania
Contact:
Onyinyechi Chukyunyere 'Gandhi'
Contact Phone:
4123702923
Contact Email:
onyymayy@gmail.com

Join us for the first installment of the African Leadership Lecture Series! The topic is "Africa's War on Poverty: Strides and Setbacks." The keynote speaker is Ambassador Geoffrey Teneilable, Nigerian Consul-General, Atlanta. Also in attendance are ambassadors of Ghana, Kenya, and Angola! Join us for the keynote speaker, followed by light refreshments, comments from each ambassador, and then a round table discussion between the ambassadors, the leadership of the African Community, and the Africa Studies program, and the PANAF e-board.

Hot Topics Over Coffee!
Changing Identities in a Globalized World
Time:
3:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

The program will focus on our changing identities in a globalized world. We will hear from student groups and faculty who work on issues of global identities, like gender empowerment and refugees. The Global Studies Center will also present new funding opportunities for students. This is a great opportunity to network with other students that know there is a big world out there. Stop by room 4217 Posvar Hall and bring a friend! Good food, good coffee, and good conversation will be provided.

Concert: Puerto Sur Trio--Música Argentina- Dos clarinetes y piano
Time:
8:00 pm
Presenter:
Julieta Ugartemendia
Location:
Frick Fine Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Cost:
Free and Open to the public!
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Phone:
4126487394
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

Tango Concert!

Saturday, February 7

Slovak Documentary Film Fest
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Western Pennsylvania Slovak Cultural Association

Saturday, February 7, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
5:00 p.m. Reception with light refreshments (R.S.V.P. required 412-956-6000 or 412-531-2990)
6:00 p.m. The Final Mission (58 minutes)
During World War II, 46 American Bombers and 8 fighter planes crashed in Slovak
territory. 106 pilots died and approximately 370 were captured and taken to prisoner of
war camps. However, many succeeded in escaping thanks to the Slovaks who hid them.
They felt that they were risking their lives for us too, although many of them had no idea
that Slovakia even existed. The fate of these Americans in Slovakia is the story of the
fight for survival in the middle of an unknown country. The is the story of the will to not
give in to hopelessness, but to confront it without losing self respect.
7:15 p.m. November + 20 (26 minutes)
Events around November 1989 in Slovakia that brought about the collapse of
Communism in the country. A documentary for all who did not and will not forget, as
well as for those who did not have a chance to experience the drama.

Sunday February 8, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
230 S. Bouquet St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
4:00 p.m. Nicky’s Family (96 minutes)
Nicky’s Family tells the nearly forgotten story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who
organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of the
World War II.
Nicky’s Family has earned rave reviews from audiences and critics around the world,
winning over 30 awards - including 14 audience awards from U.S. film festivals!

Saturday, February 14, 2015
Mt. Lebanon Public Library
16 Castle Shannon Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
2:00 p.m. In the Shadow of Time (45 Minutes)
The documentary describes the life story of Emil Svec, who was imprisoned by the
Communists for 18 years. When he managed to flee across the Iron Curtain to freedom
in Austria in the crop-duster airplane in 1959, he never expected to be back. But three
years later, he was abducted by Communist spies dispatched from Prague.

Sunday February 15, 2015
St. Gregory Church
2005 Mohawk Road
Upper St. Clair, PA 15241
3:00 p.m. Bratislava’s 1988 Good Friday: Candle Manifestation (26 minutes)
The memorable and daring open demonstration against Communism when Christians in
Bratislava gathered to call for religious freedom more than a year before Central
European regimes collapsed. The documentary includes interviews with participants and
footage from secret police cameras as they tried to disperse the crowd.
Following the movie, there will be a question and answer session conducted by
Rev. Valerian Michlek on the religious persecution of the Catholic Church in Slovakia
during the Communist regime.

Sunday, February 8

Slovak Documentary Film Fest
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Western Pennsylvania Slovak Cultural Association

Saturday, February 7, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
5:00 p.m. Reception with light refreshments (R.S.V.P. required 412-956-6000 or 412-531-2990)
6:00 p.m. The Final Mission (58 minutes)
During World War II, 46 American Bombers and 8 fighter planes crashed in Slovak
territory. 106 pilots died and approximately 370 were captured and taken to prisoner of
war camps. However, many succeeded in escaping thanks to the Slovaks who hid them.
They felt that they were risking their lives for us too, although many of them had no idea
that Slovakia even existed. The fate of these Americans in Slovakia is the story of the
fight for survival in the middle of an unknown country. The is the story of the will to not
give in to hopelessness, but to confront it without losing self respect.
7:15 p.m. November + 20 (26 minutes)
Events around November 1989 in Slovakia that brought about the collapse of
Communism in the country. A documentary for all who did not and will not forget, as
well as for those who did not have a chance to experience the drama.

Sunday February 8, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
230 S. Bouquet St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
4:00 p.m. Nicky’s Family (96 minutes)
Nicky’s Family tells the nearly forgotten story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who
organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of the
World War II.
Nicky’s Family has earned rave reviews from audiences and critics around the world,
winning over 30 awards - including 14 audience awards from U.S. film festivals!

Saturday, February 14, 2015
Mt. Lebanon Public Library
16 Castle Shannon Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
2:00 p.m. In the Shadow of Time (45 Minutes)
The documentary describes the life story of Emil Svec, who was imprisoned by the
Communists for 18 years. When he managed to flee across the Iron Curtain to freedom
in Austria in the crop-duster airplane in 1959, he never expected to be back. But three
years later, he was abducted by Communist spies dispatched from Prague.

Sunday February 15, 2015
St. Gregory Church
2005 Mohawk Road
Upper St. Clair, PA 15241
3:00 p.m. Bratislava’s 1988 Good Friday: Candle Manifestation (26 minutes)
The memorable and daring open demonstration against Communism when Christians in
Bratislava gathered to call for religious freedom more than a year before Central
European regimes collapsed. The documentary includes interviews with participants and
footage from secret police cameras as they tried to disperse the crowd.
Following the movie, there will be a question and answer session conducted by
Rev. Valerian Michlek on the religious persecution of the Catholic Church in Slovakia
during the Communist regime.

Thursday, February 12

Let's Talk Africa!- Cailtin Corrigan
The Politics of Social Responsibility in Mining: Lessons from Southern Africa
Time:
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Presenter:
Caitlin C. Corrigan, PhD Candidate, GSPIA
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact:
Eric Swetts
Contact Email:
ems137@pitt.edu

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a major topic in developing countries. While traditionally seen as only a private sector activity, CSR is very much influenced by politics and regulation in Africa. The mineral mining industry provides a clear example because of the negative social and environmental externalities associated with operations. This presentation will look at field work conducted in South Africa and Botswana in 2014, which investigated the relationship between CSR and the State in the diamond mining industry. A formal framework for understanding this relationship will then be discussed.

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Putting Climate Justice into Action
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Henia Belalia, National Organizer, Peaceful Uprising
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

A 5-part video dialogue series with international and local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of pupular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Presenter: Henia Belalia, National Organizer, Peaceful Uprising

Suggested readings:
Rapley, Chris (2014) “Climate change is not just about science – it’s about the future we want to create” The Guardian. 22 Nov. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/22/-sp-climate-change-specia...

Satgar, Vishwas (2014) “The Climate is Right for Social Change” Mail & Guardian. 17 December. Online: http://m.mg.co.za/article/2014-12-17-the-climate-is-ripe-for-social-change

McKibben, Bill (2013) “The Fossil Fuel Resistance” Rolling Stone. 25 April. Online: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-fossil-fuel-resistance-201...

More information is available on the Global Studies Center website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484.

Friday, February 13

Discussion with Dennis Jett
author of American Ambassadors: The Past, Present, and Future of America's Diplomats
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dennis Jett
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Ever wonder who becomes an American ambassador and what they do? Professor (and former ambassador) Dennis Jett will explain that and also describe how the country to which a person is sent as ambassador can be influenced by money, religion, politics, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. While some say that communications technology has made the role of an ambassador unnecessary and largely symbolic, Jett will explain why they are more important than ever.

Dennis Jett is a professor of international affairs at Pennsylvania State University. A former career diplomat, he served 28 years in the State Department in Argentina, Israel, Malawi and Liberia, on the National Security Council and was US Ambassador to Peru and Mozambique.

Modern Times in North Korea: Scenes from the Founding Years
Worlding Korea
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Suzy Kim
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Phone:
412-383-3062
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

North Korea is often portrayed in mainstream media as a backward place, a Stalinist relic without a history worth knowing. But during its founding years (1945-1950), North Korea experienced a radical social revolution when everyday life became the primary site of political struggle, including quite deliberately a feminist agenda. With historical comparisons to revolutions in the early 20th century, Suzy Kim introduces her book through rarely seen archival photos, situating the North Korean revolution within the broader history of modernity.

Saturday, February 14

Slovak Documentary Film Fest
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Western Pennsylvania Slovak Cultural Association

Saturday, February 7, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
5:00 p.m. Reception with light refreshments (R.S.V.P. required 412-956-6000 or 412-531-2990)
6:00 p.m. The Final Mission (58 minutes)
During World War II, 46 American Bombers and 8 fighter planes crashed in Slovak
territory. 106 pilots died and approximately 370 were captured and taken to prisoner of
war camps. However, many succeeded in escaping thanks to the Slovaks who hid them.
They felt that they were risking their lives for us too, although many of them had no idea
that Slovakia even existed. The fate of these Americans in Slovakia is the story of the
fight for survival in the middle of an unknown country. The is the story of the will to not
give in to hopelessness, but to confront it without losing self respect.
7:15 p.m. November + 20 (26 minutes)
Events around November 1989 in Slovakia that brought about the collapse of
Communism in the country. A documentary for all who did not and will not forget, as
well as for those who did not have a chance to experience the drama.

Sunday February 8, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
230 S. Bouquet St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
4:00 p.m. Nicky’s Family (96 minutes)
Nicky’s Family tells the nearly forgotten story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who
organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of the
World War II.
Nicky’s Family has earned rave reviews from audiences and critics around the world,
winning over 30 awards - including 14 audience awards from U.S. film festivals!

Saturday, February 14, 2015
Mt. Lebanon Public Library
16 Castle Shannon Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
2:00 p.m. In the Shadow of Time (45 Minutes)
The documentary describes the life story of Emil Svec, who was imprisoned by the
Communists for 18 years. When he managed to flee across the Iron Curtain to freedom
in Austria in the crop-duster airplane in 1959, he never expected to be back. But three
years later, he was abducted by Communist spies dispatched from Prague.

Sunday February 15, 2015
St. Gregory Church
2005 Mohawk Road
Upper St. Clair, PA 15241
3:00 p.m. Bratislava’s 1988 Good Friday: Candle Manifestation (26 minutes)
The memorable and daring open demonstration against Communism when Christians in
Bratislava gathered to call for religious freedom more than a year before Central
European regimes collapsed. The documentary includes interviews with participants and
footage from secret police cameras as they tried to disperse the crowd.
Following the movie, there will be a question and answer session conducted by
Rev. Valerian Michlek on the religious persecution of the Catholic Church in Slovakia
during the Communist regime.

Sunday, February 15

Slovak Documentary Film Fest
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Western Pennsylvania Slovak Cultural Association

Saturday, February 7, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
5:00 p.m. Reception with light refreshments (R.S.V.P. required 412-956-6000 or 412-531-2990)
6:00 p.m. The Final Mission (58 minutes)
During World War II, 46 American Bombers and 8 fighter planes crashed in Slovak
territory. 106 pilots died and approximately 370 were captured and taken to prisoner of
war camps. However, many succeeded in escaping thanks to the Slovaks who hid them.
They felt that they were risking their lives for us too, although many of them had no idea
that Slovakia even existed. The fate of these Americans in Slovakia is the story of the
fight for survival in the middle of an unknown country. The is the story of the will to not
give in to hopelessness, but to confront it without losing self respect.
7:15 p.m. November + 20 (26 minutes)
Events around November 1989 in Slovakia that brought about the collapse of
Communism in the country. A documentary for all who did not and will not forget, as
well as for those who did not have a chance to experience the drama.

Sunday February 8, 2015
Posvar Hall @ University of Pittsburgh, Room 1700
230 S. Bouquet St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
4:00 p.m. Nicky’s Family (96 minutes)
Nicky’s Family tells the nearly forgotten story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who
organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of the
World War II.
Nicky’s Family has earned rave reviews from audiences and critics around the world,
winning over 30 awards - including 14 audience awards from U.S. film festivals!

Saturday, February 14, 2015
Mt. Lebanon Public Library
16 Castle Shannon Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
2:00 p.m. In the Shadow of Time (45 Minutes)
The documentary describes the life story of Emil Svec, who was imprisoned by the
Communists for 18 years. When he managed to flee across the Iron Curtain to freedom
in Austria in the crop-duster airplane in 1959, he never expected to be back. But three
years later, he was abducted by Communist spies dispatched from Prague.

Sunday February 15, 2015
St. Gregory Church
2005 Mohawk Road
Upper St. Clair, PA 15241
3:00 p.m. Bratislava’s 1988 Good Friday: Candle Manifestation (26 minutes)
The memorable and daring open demonstration against Communism when Christians in
Bratislava gathered to call for religious freedom more than a year before Central
European regimes collapsed. The documentary includes interviews with participants and
footage from secret police cameras as they tried to disperse the crowd.
Following the movie, there will be a question and answer session conducted by
Rev. Valerian Michlek on the religious persecution of the Catholic Church in Slovakia
during the Communist regime.

Monday, February 16

Race, Sex, and Human Evolution
The Descent of Women: Gender Issues in Human Evolution
Time:
8:00 pm
Presenter:
Claudine Cohen, Director, Biology and Society Studies École Pratique Des Hautes Etúdes, Paris
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Humanities Center; University of Pittsburgh Honors College; Department of History and Philosophy of Science; Supported by the Department of Anthropology; Gender Sexuality and Women's Studies Program UPMC Health Services Division

A three-part lecture series that exposes biases that underlie the study of our evolutionary past. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Centuries before fossils were accepted as being extinct human relatives, the conception of human history was based on a Great Chain of Being that not only identified numerous human races, but arranged them and males and females within them hierarchically, from the “lowest” to the “highest”. The discovery in 1857 of the first Neanderthal was seen as providing evolutionary evidence of a racial and sexual hierarchy.

Indeed, in The Descent of Man (1871), Charles Darwin wrote at length about the evolution of “civilized” from “primitive, barbaric” humans, a notion that, in various incarnations, still informs interpretations of human evolution. This lecture series will challenge preconceived notions of race and sex from the perspectives of an artist who will discuss how, with an unbiased eye, extinct humans – male and female – would have looked, an historian of science who will deconstruct the traditional concepts of “female” and “male”, and an evolutionary biologist who will bring biology into the discussion of “race”.

Tuesday, February 17

VOLATILITY, UNCERTAINTY, AND OPPORTUNITY IN THE GLOBAL ENERGY MARKET IN 2015
Japan Update Lecture Series
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Hisanori Nei, Yongshang Wang, Rich Weber
Location:
Fairmont Pittsburgh, 510 Market St., Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of The Japan America Society of Pennsylvania, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, The Sasakawa Peace Foundation, NAJAS

The last few years have witnessed a transformation of the global energy market. The United States is now leading the world in the production of oil and natural gas. Western Pennsylvania has assumed an increas-ingly prominent role in the energy sector with the exploration and development of Marcellus Shale. Japan, in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster, has had to reassess its strategic priority on nuclear energy. The precipitous decline of oil prices that began in the latter half of 2014 has further trans-formed the worldwide energy market, with ramifi-cations that extend well beyond the energy sector.

Join The Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh for a briefing and moderated panel discussion on how the global energy market is likely to evolve in 2015. What are the opportunities that lie ahead for the Pittsburgh region and Japan, and what challenges will they have to overcome? Is the exploitation of Marcellus Shale sustainable? How can Japan reduce its dependence on imported sources of energy? Are there areas in which American and Japanese businesses can work together to take advantage of changes in the global energy sector?

Register by February 13th, 2015 at www.us-japan.org/jasp/events.html

Thursday, February 19

The Tokyo-Berlin Axis, 70 Years Later
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Ricky Law, Assistant Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University
Location:
Pittsburgh Athletic Association
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. Join the JASP for an evening of reflection on the Japanese-German alliance. Dr. Ricky Law, Assistant Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University, will speak.

His lecture will provide an overview of the origins, formation, development, and fall of the Axis alliance between Japan and Germany before and during World War II. It will discuss major events such as the Anti-Comintern Pact of 1936, the Tripartite Pact of 1940, and the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.

Join the JASP for this free evening at the Pittsburgh Athletic Association from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m., February 19, 2014. Light hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be provided. Space is limited so please register by February 13 at http://www.us-japan.org/jasp/events.html.

Friday, February 20

Covering China from the Ground Up – and Turning Reporting into Books
Talking About Asia Lecture Series
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Michael Meyer
Location:
O’Hara Student Center Ballroom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

Since first arriving in the country as a Peace Corps volunteer 20 years ago, Michael Meyer has witnessed China from the village and neighborhood level. His writing combines immersive reporting, memoir and archival research. Meyer’s award-winning first book, The Last Days of Old Beijing, documents daily life in the capital's oldest neighborhood as the city remade itself for the Olympics. His second book, published this month, In Manchuria: A Village Called Wasteland and the Transformation of Rural China, depicts life on a family’s rice farm as it becomes a corporate agribusiness. Meyer will show slides from his research, and talk about the challenges of reporting from China and how a freelance writer can fund and produce books that reach a wide audience. Books will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

Ideologies of Nomadism in Post-Soviet Tuva’s Traditional Music Scenes
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Robert O. Beahrs, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Music
Location:
132 Music Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies Department of Music

Postdoctoral Fellow Robert O. Beahrs will present a paper titled “Ideologies of Nomadism in Post-Soviet Tuva’s Traditional Music Scenes.” This paper, which flows from ten years of dissertation research, explores a theory of musical sensibility for understanding traditional music in Tuva, a republic in Russia’s south-central Siberian region. Beahrs shows how Tuvan xöömeizhi (master throat-singers) express a revitalized nomadic sensibility through their xöömei (throat-singing) practices, which has come to operate both as an ideology and a disposition for Tuvan traditional music in the post-Soviet era. Drawing on a selective use of history, cultural memory, and natural environments, post-Soviet xöömeizhi construct a nomadic sensibility that is embodied in music and sound-making activities, foregrounded in intercultural exchanges, and circulated globally as a social disposition.

Robert O. Beahrs is a sound artist, vocalist, and ethnomusicologist (PhD 2014, UC Berkeley) currently working as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Music at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Beahrs’ research focuses on post-Soviet revitalization of traditional music and expressive sound-making practices in Turkic Siberia and Mongolia. His fieldwork in the Tuva Republic (Russia), Mongolia, Europe, and the United States has been supported by a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, an American Councils Title VIII Research Fellowship, an IIE Graduate Fellowship for International Research, and a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Robbie actively sings, composes music, performs live sound art for theater/dance, and gives workshops in Tuvan throat-singing and extended vocal techniques.

Global Issues Through Literature: Palestine
Mornings of Jenin
Time:
5:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Luke Peterson, University of Pittsburgh
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

K-16 Educators are invited to attend the CERIS spring 2015 book discussion. Dr. Luke Peterson of the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate discussion. Registration is required. Educators can participate in person or online. Dinner, parking, and the book will be provided.
Mornings of Jenin is the story of four generations of Palestinians living through the birth of Israel and the never ending war that follows. Susan Abulhawa gives the terrible conflict a human face. For more information, go to: www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/workshops
The registration form can be found at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ln-kd54H6Egq7OscLhU822fvM-en3HuuZcYCKgV...

Saturday, February 21

Undergraduate Asian Studies Research Conference
Time:
8:00 am to 4:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

The Pittsburgh Asia Consortium [PAC] Undergraduate Research Conference is a one-day, interdisciplinary event for students from PA, WV, OH, MD, NY, NJ and DE with an interest in any geographical region of Asia, including the Middle East. Students will give 15-minute presentations on Asia-related research topics from any discipline, with faculty from PAC overseeing each student panel. The keynote speaker will be Michael Meyer, author of Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed and In Manchuria: A Village Called Wasteland and the Transformation of Rural China and Assistant Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh.

Tuesday, February 24

International Research: Logistical and Ethical Considerations
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
O'Hara Student Center Ballroom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

As the world becomes more accessible through technology and networking, international research activities are increasing in the academic arena. This program will provide specific information for faculty and students who are planning to conduct international research now or in the future. It is highly recommended that all faculty mentors who will be advising students going abroad attend this session. All are welcome to attend and no registration is required. For more information or advance questions, contact Patty Orndoff at pao100@pitt.edu.

Thursday, February 26

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Culture Against Climate Change
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr, Hip Hop Caucus
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

A 5-part video dialogue series with international and local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of pupular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Presenter: Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr, Hip Hop Caucus

Suggested readings:
Kozlowska, Hanna (2014) “The Climate Movement Is About Much More Than Just Climate” New York Times. 23 September. Online: http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/23/the-climate-movement-is-abou...

“People’s Climate Music” (2014) Hip Hop Caucus. Online: peoplesclimatemusic.com/about/

Podesta, P.J. and Laura Smith (2014) “The Changing Face of Climate Change” Slate. 22 September. http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/09/people_...

“The Fossil Fuel Resistance: The New Green Heroes” (2013) Rolling Stone. 11 April. Online: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/lists/the-fossil-fuel-resistance-me...

More information may be found on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484

Friday, February 27 to Saturday, February 28

10th Annual Faculty Research Conference: 1989 and its Aftermath: Taking Stock of the Berlin Republic
Time:
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Faculty Organizer: Prof. Georg Menz (Visiting Professor in Political Science)
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu
Law and the Legal Profession in China
Time:
8:45 am to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Various Scholars
Location:
Alcoa Room, School of Law
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center University of Pittsburgh School of Law Center for International Legal Education, China Council
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Phone:
412-383-3062
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

Over the past two decades the profession of law within China has undergone tremendous change. China’s ascension to the World Trade Organization, massive foreign investment, and an increasingly cosmopolitan middle class have forced both the central government in Beijing and the country’s practicing attorneys to grapple with new clientele, new areas of practice, and an increasingly nuanced popular response to legal issues. This conference will bring together an international panel of multidisciplinary experts to examine the development and current practice of the legal profession in China.

Monday, March 2

Race, Sex, and Human Evolution
Race and the Bio-politics of Human Ancestry
Time:
8:00 pm
Presenter:
Jonathan Marks, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Humanities Center; University of Pittsburgh Honors College; Department of History and Philosophy of Science; Supported by the Department of Anthropology; Gender Sexuality and Women's Studies Program UPMC Health Services Division

A three-part lecture series that exposes biases that underlie the study of our evolutionary past. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Centuries before fossils were accepted as being extinct human relatives, the conception of human history was based on a Great Chain of Being that not only identified numerous human races, but arranged them and males and females within them hierarchically, from the “lowest” to the “highest”. The discovery in 1857 of the first Neanderthal was seen as providing evolutionary evidence of a racial and sexual hierarchy.

Indeed, in The Descent of Man (1871), Charles Darwin wrote at length about the evolution of “civilized” from “primitive, barbaric” humans, a notion that, in various incarnations, still informs interpretations of human evolution. This lecture series will challenge preconceived notions of race and sex from the perspectives of an artist who will discuss how, with an unbiased eye, extinct humans – male and female – would have looked, an historian of science who will deconstruct the traditional concepts of “female” and “male”, and an evolutionary biologist who will bring biology into the discussion of “race”.

Friday, March 20 to Saturday, March 21

The 2015 Latin American Social and Public Policy Conference—Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh--CALL FOR PAPERS
Time:
12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Luis Bravo
Contact Phone:
412 648 7393
Contact Email:
bravo@pitt.edu

The organizers invite students of any field to submit papers related to the topics of social and public policy in Latin America. You may also propose to form a panel for presentation and discussion. Example topics include but are not limited to: human security, immigration, governance, social conflict, voting, fiscal policy.
• Please submit your topic with a brief description (approximately 75 to 100 words), using the Abstract Form below, by January 23, 2015.
• You will be notified of the committee’s decision by January 30, 2015.
• The deadline for submission of final papers will be due March 1, 2015.
To submit an abstract please go to: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/laspp_call

Friday, March 20 to Sunday, March 22

Muslims in a Global Context: Europe
PS 1903
Time:
5:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
Room 2200 Sennott Square, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center Department of Political Science Carnegie Mellon University

The Muslims in the Global Context series offers the opportunity to examine the factors and trends that are having major impacts on these diverse regions and their relationships with other world regions and countries. The mini-courses consist of presentations on topics of critical importance to the understanding of Muslims in diverse regions of the world. In addition to attendance at all lectures, students enrolled for credit are required to develop and write a research paper on one of the themes of the mini-course and answer reflection prompts during the course. One- credit/ 3 units for CMU students is provided for the completion of each mini-course.

This one credit mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around the world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community. The series and course seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim community around the world. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world, the mini course series seeks to have students gain understanding of the religious, cultural, economical and political influences of Muslims in a global context.

5pm Friday March 20, 2015 to 1pm Sunday, March 22, 2015 (Room 2200 Sennott Square, University of Pittsburgh)

All course information, including the speakers, schedule, and readings, may be found on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/mini-course/europe

Saturday, March 21

35th Annual Latin American & Caribbean Festival
Time:
12:00 pm to 10:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
1st Floor Posvar Hall--Galleria
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies Med Health Services & Pittsburgh Cardiovascular Institute
Cost:
Free and open to the public!
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Phone:
4126487394
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

The Festival will feature food and craft vendors as well as community organization tables and music and dance performances from Noon to 10:00 p.m.

Thursday, March 26

Colorful Cuisine: Healthy Japanese Bento
Time:
5:30 pm
Presenter:
Ms. Debra Samuels
Location:
Wexford, PA
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of

Do you enjoy Japanese cuisine?

Do you want to learn how to make your favorite dishes at home?

Ms. Debra Samuels, food writer, cooking instructor, and best-selling author of My Japanese Table, will demonstrate the elements of a healthy and beautiful Japanese bento, including foods with the “Five Colors:” red, green, yellow, white, and black. She will also give attendees a primer on how to create a bento that will be a delight for your child – or you!

Join the JASP in welcoming Ms. Debra Samuels to Pittsburgh at a Wexford-area venue (to be announced) on March 26th. Please register by March 19th for a delicious and educational night!

Friday, March 27 to Saturday, March 28

Graduate Student Conference: Still United? The EU through Enlargement, Crisis, and Transformation
Time:
8:30 am to 4:30 pm
Presenter:
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu

In 2005 Mark Leonard postulated, "Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century.” Ten years later, the EU has seen the rejection of European Treaty, stalled enlargement, the inability of European soft power to affect the Arab spring, a weak response to Russian dismantling of Georgia and Ukraine, and the Eurozone crisis. The rise of nationalist parties threatens the very integrity of the Union. In contrast, the ECB has responded to the crisis with concerted action, Croatia joined the Union as the 28th member, and the final institutional changes of the Lisbon Treaty are taking effect. After such a tumultuous decade, is there still cause for optimism regarding the European project? The Organizing Committee of the Tenth Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union welcomes submissions from all disciplines and topics including, but not limited to, EU politics, governance, economics, history, security studies, institutions and behavior studies, as well as policy, enlargement, immigration, development, trade, and foreign policy. Papers addressing the theme of the conference will receive special consideration.

The University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh houses one of the largest and most complete archives of primary and secondary documents on the European Union, dating back to the beginnings of the European Coal and Steel Community. Conference presenters are given access to the archive for research during their stay.

Wednesday, April 1

Placeholder INPAC Event
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Rachel Jacobson
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Indo-Pacific Council Department of Music
Contact:
Rachel Jacobson
Contact Phone:
412-648-7370
Contact Email:
rej16@pitt.edu

This placeholder event is created to demonstrate how it would look to display only INPAC events on a page within the Asian Studies Center website.

Thursday, April 2

Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers' Series: Peter Hessler
Time:
8:30 pm
Presenter:
Peter Heslsler, 2014/15 William Block Sr. Award Winner
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Announced by:
Asian Studies Center on behalf of Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, University Store on Fifth
Contact Phone:
412-624-6508

Peter Hessler has received the 2008 National Magazine Award for Excellence in Reporting, a 2011 Macarthur Fellowship, and the 2001 Kiriyama Prize. He is the author of River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze; Country Driving: A Chinese Road Trip; Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West; and Oracle Bones: A Journey through Time in China, a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award. He is a contributing writer for National Geographic and a staff writer at The New Yorker, for which he has served as the Beijing, China correspondent from 2000 to 2007 and currently covers Egypt.

Thursday, April 9 to Friday, April 10

15th Annual Policy Conference: Transatlantic Responses to Militant Islam: Countering Violent Extremism in the United States and the European Union
Time:
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Faculty Organizer: Prof. Michael Kenney (GSPIA)
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu

Wednesday, April 15

Cultures Day at Harrold Elementary School
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
African Studies Program
Location:
Harrold Middle School
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact Email:
AfricanStudies@pitt.edu

Are you interested in teaching 7-8 grade students about Africa? Please join us for our annual visit to Harrold Middle School as part of Cultures Day! This is an excellent volunteer opportunity and a great way to use your knowledge of Africa in a uniquely enriching way! The date is still TBD and will be updated when it is announced. Interested participants should email AfricanStudies@pitt.edu.

Date: Mid to late April 2015, To Be Determined