Events

Wednesday, October 22

Conference -- Middle East Dialogues
Dr. Luke Peterson
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Global Studies Center
Elaine Linn
eel58@pitt.edu

The Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh presents Middle East Dialogues, a 3-part series of video-conference discussions with college students at American University in Cairo.

You are invited to participate in the discussion. Come and exchange ideas about the pressing issues of our times from students whom may have a very different world view. Read the two brief articles and come engaged to dialogue!

Dr. Luke Peterson, UCIS Visiting Professor in Contemporary International Issues, University of Pittsburgh and Dr. Riham Bahi, Assistant Professor at American University in Cairo will moderate each session.

Topic for October 22 – Islam in the 21st Century: Views from East and West

Suggested Readings:

1) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/opinion/roger-cohen-a-21st-century-isl...
2) http://www.internationalpolicydigest.org/2014/05/30/the-rise-and-fall-of...
3) http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Twenty-First-Centu...

Cultural Event -- 6th Annual East European Festival
6:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Assembly Room, William Pitt Union
Center for Russian and East European Studies
& Ukrainian clubs, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and..., the REES Undergraduate Student Association, Turkish
Free
Anna Talone
ant28@pitt.edu

6:00 pm: Doors open and food is served
6:15 pm: Welcome and presentation by CREES
6:30 pm: The Pitt Carpathian Ensemble
7:15 pm: The Junior Tamburitzans of South Hills
8:00 pm: Film introduction by GOSECA: Border Café (Café Transit)

Note: OCC Credit available at REES table.

Thursday, October 23

Lecture -- Let's Talk Africa!- Emily Kinkead
Emily Kinkead, Second year law student at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
4130 WWPH
African Studies Program
Eric Swetts
ems137@pitt.edu

With the current epidemic level of HIV infection in Africa, Emily will be discussing the care needed by HIV positive individuals beyond the medical. Following her first year of law school, Emily spent two months in Eldoret, Kenya, interning for the Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret (LACE). LACE is a non-profit legal aid office that provides comprehensive legal services to all persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Additionally, LACE represents victims of sexual and gender-based violence. More information about LACE can be found at http://lacelaw.org/KE/.

Friday, October 24

Lecture -- Sustainability Policies in the US and Europe: A Comparison of Sources and Outcomes
Professor Michaël Aklin, Assistant Professor of Political Science
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Studies Association
and the Office of the Provost of the University, Department of Political Science, Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation
euce@pitt.edu

Is Germany the new California? Is Texas the new Denmark? Historically, the political leadership on sustainable development has shifted back and forth between the U.S. and Europe. Nowhere is this as evident as in the promotion of renewable energy. Where do we stand now? Dr. Aklin will explore the sources of renewable energy policies both across continents and vertically within the European Union and the U.S.

Monday, October 27

Information Session -- ACTR/American Councils Study Abroad Programs
Graham Hettlinger, Director of Higher Education Programs at the American Councils for International Education (ACTR)
12:00 pm - 2:30 pm
1401 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

For graduate students: 12:30-1:10pm
For undergraduate students: 1:15-2:30pm. The undergraduate session is for students to come when they can and leave when they must.

Graham Hettlinger, Director of Higher Education Programs at the American Councils for International Education (ACTR), will be on campus on Monday, October 27 to discuss programs and grants for language study and research in Russia, Eurasia, and Southeastern Europe. American Councils programs include the Russian Language and Area Studies Program, the Fulbright-Hays Summer Teachers Program (recently renewed for 2015), the Eurasia Regional Language Program, the Balkan Language Initiative, and the Title VIII Research Scholars Program. American Councils also operates a summer internship program providing professional experience for U.S. undergraduates throughout the region.

Operating since 1976, American Councils programs have served more than 7,000 students and scholars in Russia and Eurasia. American Councils summer and semester programs for Russian language study are conducted in partnership with Moscow International University, the Russian State Pedagogical University (Herzen) in downtown St. Petersburg, the KORA Russian Language Center in Vladimir, and the Kazakh National University in Almaty.

Lecture -- Political Order and Political Decay
Francis Fukuyama, Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
The Twentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd. 15213
Center for Russian and East European Studies
and the Dick Thornburgh Forum for Law and Public Policy, The Center for Metropolitan Studies, The Political Science Department

Francis Fukuyama is the author of “Political Order and Political Decay,” “The Origins of Political Order,” “The End of History and the Last Man,” “Trust,” and “America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy.” He is an Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to CMSGSPIA@pitt.edu to reserve a seat.

Tuesday, October 28

Lecture -- Trotsky, Bureaucracy, and Capitalist Restoration
Thomas Twiss
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies

Between 1917 and his death in 1940 Leon Trotsky advanced three different analyses of the problem of Soviet bureaucracy—each providing a different account of how bureaucracy was promoting capitalist restoration in the USSR. The presentation will review Trotsky’s contributions on this subject and conclude with some observations regarding the weaknesses and strengths of Trotsky’s final theory.

Presentation -- Paraguay y la Integración Asimétrica Latinoamericana
Luis A. Fretes
12:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Center for Latin American Studies
Department of Political Science
Free
Luz Amanda Hank
lavst12@pitt.edu

Luis A. Fretes Carreras is a past Ambassador of Paraguay to Portugal (2009-2014). He is a professor of Law and Political Science, and was the Director of the Center for Public Policy at the Universidad Católica de Asunción. He teaches courses in Contemporary Political Science, Democratization, International Politics, and Latin American Studies. He is also associate professor at the Center for International Studies of Lisbon (CEI-ISCTE).
Presentation will be in Spanish.
Lunch will be provided.

Lecture -- The Triumph of Morality: A Tribute to the Righteous of Greece
Dr. Yolanda Avram-Willis with special guest, Dr. Michael Naragon
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
McConomy Auditorium | University Center, Carnegie Mellon University Campus
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center

Dr. Avram-Willis is a survivor of the Holocaust in Greece.
A light reception and mini-exhibit will follow the lecture.

On October 28, 1940, the cry “OHI” (No!) resounded across all of Greece as the beginning of the Greek people’s bold resistance to the Axis ultimatum to join or be destroyed. The ensuing Nazi occupation of Greece between 1941-1944 ravaged the country and disemboweled entire villages and towns. Even though most of Greece’s Jews were murdered in the Nazi “Final Solution”, Hitler’s savagery was dealt a humiliation as Greek Christians hid, transferred, and otherwise protected as many Greek Jews as possible. From the National Resistance to Archbishop Damaskinos, regional bishops, clergy, civic leaders, and simple families, nowhere else in Nazi-occupied Southern Europe was there so much effort in protecting and saving Jews from the inhumanity of the Nazi regime and its philosophy.

On October 28th, 2014, the Greek-American and Jewish Communities of Western Pennsylvania will come together to remember and to offer a tribute to the Righteous of Greece. The story of Greek Christians protecting and saving Greek Jews remains a largely unexplored aspect of the period’s history and stands in sharp contrast to the darkness of that epoch. It is a story of morality, love, respect, sacrifice, and ultimately an expression of the humanity that binds people together.

For more information, contact info@pahellenicfoundation.org.

Wednesday, October 29

Panel Discussion -- Risk vs. Resilience in Northeast Asia
Ronni Alexander, Haibo Zhang, Hongyun Zhou, Fuli Ai
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Room 3800 Posvar Hall
Asian Studies Center
Free

Four Visiting Scholars at the Center for Disaster Management will lead a dialogue on the impact of recent extreme events in their respective countries, and outline new approaches for managing risk and building resilience to hazards at the community level. Dean John T.S. Keeler will introduce the research and exchange programs between GSPIA and Kobe University, Japan and Nanjing University, China for faculty and students.

The panel will include:

Art, Therapy, and Disaster Recovery: Popoki in the Tohoku Region, Japan - Ronni Alexander, Professor, GSICS, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.

Social Media and Community Resilience in Lushan, China: April 20. 2013 - Haibo Zhang, Deputy Director, Center for Public Risk and Crisis Management, Nanjing University, China.

The Emerging Crisis in Elder Care in China - Hongyun Zhou, Assoc. Professor, School of Public Administration, ZhongNan University ,Wuhan, China.

Visualization of Risk in Urban Environments - Fuli Ai, Post Doctoral Fellow, Center for Disaster Management, GSPIA.

Sponsored by the Center for Disaster Management.
Tea and cookies will be served.

Thursday, October 30

Lecture -- Political Competence & Voting Behavior in Elections to the European Parliament
Professor Nick Clark, Susquehanna University
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

Dr. Clark’s research focuses on European politics, the European Union, and comparative political behavior. More specifically, his research agenda seeks to empirically assess theoretical claims about the quality of democratic citizenship and governance in multi-level political systems such as the European Union. His lecture will highlight the state of the public’s knowledge about the European Union and how that knowledge influences voting behavior in European elections.

Lecture -- Afropean: Narratives of the 21st Century
Alain Mabanckou (UCLA) and Dominic Thomas (UCLA)
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Cathedral of Learning
African Studies Program, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Department of French and Italian and Africana Studies, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities Center
frit@pitt.edu

The colloquium aims to draw out the multiple meanings of "Afropean" at the intersection of aesthetic and political forms of expression of the African diaspora. Responses will be given by John Walsh, Department of French and Italian.

Friday, October 31

Lecture -- Asia in the World Histories: Frontiers and Environments
Peter Perdue, Yale University
12:00 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center
World History Center
World History Center
412-624-3073
worldhis@pitt.edu

Because of the dramatic growth of Asian economies, the salience of Asia among world historians has risen significantly in the past decades. We can see this prominence in the greater space devoted to Asia in world history textbooks, curricula, and to some extent in faculty positions. Yet because of the lingering influence of Eurocentrism and the constraints imposed by traditional Area Studies, gaps and discrepancies remain. To point towards ways of overcoming these limitations, I will comment on recent work in China in the early modern and modern period, from the perspective of frontiers and environmental history.

Film -- The Memory Project and New Voices in Chinese Documentary
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Langley Hall A224
Asian Studies Center
and Humanities Center, Department of English, Film Studies Programs

WU Wenguang, one of the founding figures in Chinese independent documentary, brings three young filmmakers from China to present their collective work, “the Memory Project.” The project is based at Coachangdi Workstation in Beijing. From there, young filmmakers fanned out to return to family villages and their own pasts, real and imagined, to inquire about The Great Famine of 1959-61 — a disaster of whose memories have been actively abandoned by the state. Aiming to create a “folk memory archive,” the project, which combines documentary films, oral history records, and live performances, presents an alternative narrative of Chinese history than the one written in official textbooks. As these young filmmakers search for the distant memory from an old generation that is still living in rural poverty, their encounter with the past reveals as much about the wish for memory as of memory itself and of the interesting role of film in such projects of retrieval..

THE FILMS:

Self-Portrait and Three Women (2010, 70min)

Directed by Zhang Mengqi.

The filmmaker’s statement:

This year I turned 23, the age when women become pregnant with dreams. Yet, even while nursing our own dreams, we must carry the burden of two other women’s dreams as well. This film begins with my own search, then delving into my mother and her mother, where blood has flowed through three generations, in these women who grew up in different times. As a victim of an oppressive marriage, my grandmother held hopes for my mother to

have a happy marriage. When my mother became a victim herself, she turned those hopes to me. Marriage may be every girl’s dream, but it is also the murderer of those dreams.

Self-Portrait: At 47 KM (2011, 77min)

Directed by Zhang Mengqi.

The filmmaker’s statement:

After my first documentary Self-portrait and Three Women, my second “self-portrait” was painted in a village named “47 KM.” This village is located 47 KM from Suizhou, Hubei Province, where my father was born. He left the village when he was 20, but his father, my grandfather, still lives there. In the summer and winter of 2010, through my participation in the “Folk Memory Project”, I went back to the village, which seems disconnected from my current life, and re-discovered and came to better understand my grandfather, the old villagers who underwent the disaster of the famine fifty years ago, as well as the village, which always perplexed and embarrassed me. What does “47 KM” really mean to me? It seems to be a mirror, I see myself in front of it.

THE FILMMAKERS:
Zhang Mengqi was born in 1987. She graduated from the Dance Academy at the Minzu University of China in 2008. Since 2009, she has been a resident artist at CCD Workstation. Her four documentary films, Self-portrait with Three Women (2010), Self-Portrait: At 47 KM (2011), Self-portrait: Dancing at 47 KM (2012), and Self-Portrait: Dreaming at 47 KM (2013), complete her “self-portrait series”

Saturday, November 1

Film -- The Memory Project and New Voices in Chinese Documentary
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Langley Hall A224
Asian Studies Center
Confucius Institute, Department of English, Film Studies Program, Humanities Center

WU Wenguang, one of the founding figures in Chinese independent documentary, brings three young filmmakers from China to present their collective work, “the Memory Project.” The project is based at Coachangdi Workstation in Beijing. From there, young filmmakers fanned out to return to family villages and their own pasts, real and imagined, to inquire about The Great Famine of 1959-61 — a disaster of whose memories have been actively abandoned by the state. Aiming to create a “folk memory archive,” the project, which combines documentary films, oral history records, and live performances, presents an alternative narrative of Chinese history than the one written in official textbooks. As these young filmmakers search for the distant memory from an old generation that is still living in rural poverty, their encounter with the past reveals as much about the wish for memory as of memory itself and of the interesting role of film in such projects of retrieval..

Time: November 1 (Saturday), 1 pm- 5 pm
Location: LANGLEY HALL A224
Screening and Discussion
Discussants: Jinying Li, Neepa Majumdar, Robert Clift

(1:00 pm - 2:16 pm) Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013, 76min) Directed by Li Xinmin
(2:30 pm - 3:55 pm) Children's Village (2012, 85min) Directed by Zou Xueping
(4:10 pm - 5:00 pm) Discussion with filmmakers Wu Wenguang, Zou Xueping, Li Xinmin, Zhang Mengqi and Pitt faculty Jinying Li, Neepa Majumdar, and Robert Clift.

THE FILMS:
Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013, 76min)
Directed by Li Xinmin
The filmmaker’s statement:
This film is about a four-year-old boy, Xiaoqiang. His mother, Xiaoqun, is just of my age. I filmed Xiaoqun and her family last year. This year I went back filming her son Xiaoqiang who I found so interesting. We hung out together and picked up garbage in the village, witnessing the real life of old villagers and the damage they did to the environment.

Children's Village (2012, 85min)
Directed by Zou Xueping
The filmmaker’s statement:
In the winter of 2012, I returned to my village to continue interviewing elderly villagers. Meanwhile, I began investigating and gathering statistics on those who died during the Great Famine. I also started fund-raising to build a memorial for those who died. Many village children, from 10-15 years old, voluntarily joined these activities. They took the DV camera I gave them, visited old folks, interviewed them, and collected statistics and donations. This project gave them their first opportunity to learn about and appreciate the history of their village. Assisted by these "little angels," I no longer felt lonely in the village. I started seeing hope for the future. This film forms an important part of my Zou Village series.

THE FILMMAKERS:
Zou Xueping was born in Bingzhou City, Shandong Province, in 1985. In 2009 she graduated from the Department of New Media at the China Academy of Fine Arts. She is currently a resident artist at Wu Wenguang's Caochangdi (CCD) Workshop in Beijing. She has completed a documentary series centered on her home Village, including Mom (2008), The Starving Village (2010), Satiated Village (2011) which won an “Award of Excellence” at Beijing Independent Film Festival 2012, Children's Village (2012) and Trash Village (2013).

Li Xinmin was born in a mountain village in Yunnan Province in 1988. Her formal education stopped at the fifth grade due to poverty. At the age of 16, she began working as a migrant worker in the city to provide for her rural family. Since 2007, she has been working in CCD Workstation and completed documentary films Back to Huamulin (2011), Huamulin 2012 (2012) and Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013).

Sunday, November 2

Cultural Event -- Slovak Heritage Festival
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cathedral of Learning Commons Room
Center for Russian and East European Studies
and Pitt Student Slovak Club, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Slovak Studies Program
Free
Christine Metil
slavic@pitt.edu

This year’s musical performers:
Jozef Ivaška, internationally renowned singer from Slovakia
The Singing Revil’ak Family of Bardejov, Slovakia
Pittsburgh Slovakians
PAS (Pittsburgh Area Slovaks)
Slavjane Folk Ensemble
Ben Sorenson on Fujara
And others!

Also Featuring: Cultural Displays & Lectures
Shop for Christmas: Slovak and East European import vendors
Ethnic Food (klobasa, halušky, holupki, pirohy, and pastries)
(please donate cookies or pastries in support of this wonderful FREE festival. Bring them to the pastry table in the Commons Room)

Thursday, November 6

Lecture -- Let's Talk Africa!- Dr. Howard French
Dr. Howard French Associate Professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Kurtzman Room, William Pitt Union
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center
GSPIA
Eric Swetts
ems137@pitt.edu

Dr. French will discuss the relationship between China and Africa in a way that will help us understand the encounter between these two parts of the world. Having worked as an international diplomat and travelled extensively in Africa and China, he will tap into his wealth of experience as he shares the conversations Africans are having about China’s role in their communities and also the conversations the Chinese are having about their involvement in Africa. The question in many people’s minds is “Are the Chinese helping to bring about development that will change lives in Africa?”

About the Speaker: Dr. French was the bureau chief of the New York Times' Shanghai office from 2003-08, as well as a weekly columnist
on global affairs for the International Herald Tribune, as part of a 22-year career as a foreign correspondent.

Wednesday, November 12

Lecture -- Marketing, Product Placement, Crowd Sourcing, and the Capitalism of New Russian Cinema
Richard Beach Gray, PhD Student, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Thursday, November 13

Lecture -- The Challenges and Promise of Democratic Governance in Asia
David D. Arnold, President of the Asia Foundation
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
William Pitt Union Building/Lower Lobby
Asian Studies Center
The Center for International Legal Education at the School..., The Dick Thornburgh Forum for Law & Public Policy, The Institute of Politics, The Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business, The University Honors College
Free (must register beforehand)

2014 has been a remarkable year in terms of democratic developments in Asia. Landmark elections in India and Indonesia brought dramatic leadership changes to the region's two largest democracies. Afghan citizens defied Taliban threats to exercise their franchise in elections leading to the country's first democratic transition from one elected president to another, and student-led protests on the streets of Hong Kong demanded a greater voice in choosing their elected leaders. At the same time, a military coup in Thailand displaced a popularly-elected government, one-party rule consolidated its hold on Bangladeshi political life, opposition protests immobilized Islamabad following parliamentary elections in Pakistan, and China's new leadership signaled a diminished tolerance for political dissent and civil society activism. While the Asia Pacific region continues to show overall progress in respect for human rights and adherence to rule of law, there are also signs of democratic retreat. Drawing on The Asia Foundation's six decades of experience in promoting democratic governance in Asia, the president of the Foundation will examine both the opportunities and obstacles facing different Asian countries on their paths toward more transparent, accountable and responsive systems of government.

Please register at: https://www.thornburghforum.pitt.edu/node/455.

Saturday, November 15

Film -- Film screening: Magicky hlas rebelky (The Magical Voice of a Rebel)
This event's time has changed
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Nationality Rooms
Honorary Consul of the Czech Embassy
Free
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

This is the first film in the series, "The Play's the Thing: Vaclav Havel, Art and Politics," presented at Pitt by the Czechoslovak Nationality Room courtesy of the Czech Embassy. "Magicky hlas rebelky" is a 2014 documentary about the Czech singer Marta Kubisova, who has become a symbol in the Czech Republic of the period in history known as the Velvet Revolution (1989), when a mass protest movement led to the fall of communism in Czechoslovakia. The film includes segments of members of the dissident organization Charter 77, including former Czech President Vaclav Havel. It received the audience award at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival this year and is currently showing in movie theaters throughout the Czech Republic. The producers are making screenings available in the U.S. in commemoration of the 25th year since the Velvet Revolution. This film is in Czech with English subtitles.

Sunday, November 16

Film -- Havel Film Festival
3:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Nationality Rooms

Two Films at 3:00 – 5:00 PM
* Joseph Killian aka A Person to Be Supported (1963) Czech with English subtitles, 38 min. Directed by Pavel Juracek

* A Report on Party and Guests (1968) Czech with English subtitles, 71 min. Directed by Jan Nemec

Two Films at 6:30 – 9:00 PM
* The Uninvited Guest (1969) Czech with English subtitles, 22 min. Directed by Vlastimil Venclik

* And the Beggar’s Opera Again (1996) Czech with English subtitles, 60 min. Directed by Olga Summerova

Monday, November 17

Film -- Havel Film Festival
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, International Week, Nationality Rooms

Two Films at 6:30 – 9:00 PM
* Who Is Vaclav Havel? (1977) Czech with English subtitles, 11 min.
* The Power of the Powerless (2009) English, 78 min.

Panel Discussion following films: Panelists include Steve Sokol, CEO, Pittsburgh World Affairs Council, John Allison, Sunday Editor, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Tuesday, November 18

Lecture -- Israel-Palestine in the Print News Media: Conflict and Representation in the Middle East
Luke Peterson
(All day)
Lower Lounge, William Pitt Union
Global Studies Center
Free
Veronica Dristas
dristas@pitt.edu

Dr. Luke Peterson will discuss his newly published book Palestine-Israel in the Print News Media: Contending Discourses in which he argues for the existence of national perspectives conditioning international events which are constructed, distributed, and reinforced in the print news media. Dr. Peterson will connect his research on representations of Palestine-Israel in recent conflict events with the ongoing news media portrayals of the Islamic State and American intervention in the Middle East throughout the course of the twenty-first century.

Friday, November 21

Lecture -- Making Mosques in America and Japan; or, How Islam Went Truly Global
Nile Green, University of California, Los Angeles
12:00 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center
Humanities Center
World History Center
412-624-3073
worldhis@pitt.edu

In the early 1920s and 30s, the first purpose-built mosques were established in the United States and Japan. Despite being on the far sides of the planet in Detroit and Kobe, their foundation reflected the ability of South Asian Muslim "religious entrepreneurs" to operate on what was by the 1920s a truly global scale. In tracing the commonalities between this first institutional emergence of Islam in two new world regions, the lecture identifies the global processes of religious competition and exchange and the reasons why Indian Muslims emerged at the forefront of them.

Tuesday, December 2

Workshop -- High School Model EU
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
kal68@pitt.edu

The EUCE/ESC will be hosting the 2014 High School Model EU, which allows students the opportunity to participate in a simulation of a recent European Council meeting. For more information, please contact EUCE/ESC Assistant Director for External Affairs, Kate Bowersox, at kal68@pitt.edu.

Thursday, February 12

Lecture -- Let's Talk Africa!- Alejandro Trelles
Alejandro Trelles, PhD candidate in political science at the University of Pittsburgh
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
4130 WWPH
African Studies Program
Eric Swetts
ems137@pitt.edu

Electoral Management Bodies (EMBs) regulate access to power in most countries by organizing and implementing elections. His research aims to answer the following questions: a) When do political elites decide to create formally and informally autonomous electoral institutions to regulate elections? And b) when (if ever) do autonomous electoral institutions aid in stabilizing or building democracy?

Friday, March 27

Conference -- Graduate Student Conference: Still United? The EU through Enlargement, Crisis, and Transformation
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
euce@pitt.edu

In 2005 Mark Leonard postulated, "Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century.” Ten years later, the EU has seen the rejection of European Treaty, stalled enlargement, the inability of European soft power to affect the Arab spring, a weak response to Russian dismantling of Georgia and Ukraine, and the Eurozone crisis. The rise of nationalist parties threatens the very integrity of the Union. In contrast, the ECB has responded to the crisis with concerted action, Croatia joined the Union as the 28th member, and the final institutional changes of the Lisbon Treaty are taking effect. After such a tumultuous decade, is there still cause for optimism regarding the European project? The Organizing Committee of the Tenth Annual Graduate Student Conference on the European Union welcomes submissions from all disciplines and topics including, but not limited to, EU politics, governance, economics, history, security studies, institutions and behavior studies, as well as policy, enlargement, immigration, development, trade, and foreign policy. Papers addressing the theme of the conference will receive special consideration.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: November 21, 2014

Abstracts should be 250-300 words in length. Preference will be given to abstracts that clearly specify the research design of the paper, including its theoretical approach and methods. Abstracts must be submitted on-line at http://www.eustudies.org/. Please also upload a current CV with your submission. Participation is limited to authors enrolled in degree-granting graduate or professional programs at the time of the conference. Housing is provided for accepted conference participants

The University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh houses one of the largest and most complete archives of primary and secondary documents on the European Union, dating back to the beginnings of the European Coal and Steel Community. Conference presenters are given access to the archive for research during their stay.

Thursday, April 2

Lecture -- Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers' Series: Peter Hessler
Peter Heslsler, 2014/15 William Block Sr. Award Winner
8:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Asian Studies Center
Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, University Store on Fifth
412-624-6508

Peter Hessler has received the 2008 National Magazine Award for Excellence in Reporting, a 2011 Macarthur Fellowship, and the 2001 Kiriyama Prize. He is the author of River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze; Country Driving: A Chinese Road Trip; Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West; and Oracle Bones: A Journey through Time in China, a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award. He is a contributing writer for National Geographic and a staff writer at The New Yorker, for which he has served as the Beijing, China correspondent from 2000 to 2007 and currently covers Egypt.