Events

Sunday, September 21

Cultural Event -- Kechera, the Award-Winning Folk Ensemble of Jakubany, Slovakia
5:00 pm
915 Dickson Street, Munhall, PA 15210
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Carpatho-Rusyn Cultural Center of Pittsburgh
$12.00
Maryann Sivak
masivak@aol.com

Tuesday, September 23

Panel Discussion -- THE SCOTTISH REFERENDUM: RESULTS & IMPLICATIONS
Alicia Henderson (University of Edinburgh), Guy Peters (University of Pittsburgh), and André Lecours (University of Ottawa)
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence

“Should Scotland be an independent country?” In a referendum scheduled for September 18th, voters in that country will have an opportunity to vote ‘yes’ or ‘no’ on that very question. On Tuesday, Sepetember 23rd, the EUCE at Pitt will devote the first session of its award-winning Conversations on Europe virtual roundtable series to a discussion of the results of the referendum. What is the future of the Scottish National Party? How will this effect UK politics? What are the implications of the results for other nationalist movements in Europe and North America? Are there useful comparisons to be drawn between the 2014 Scottish Referendum and the 1995 Québeqois referendum? Please join us at noon in 4217 Posvar Hall for what promises to be a lively discussion. Ron Linden, Director of the EUCE and Professor of Political Science, will moderate.

Reception -- Global Studies Center Reception for Students, Faculty and Staff
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Global Studies Center

Learn about the various events and programs the GSC offers through this opportunity to interact with various faculty, GSC students, and staff. Mingle with current and new Global Studies students, fellows, and faculty and learn about our new programming initiatives.

Wednesday, September 24

Lecture -- The evolution of Albanian foreign policy since the end of Communism and prospects for the future
Agata Biernat, PhD Student, University of Nicolaus Copernicus, Poland
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies

For many decades Albania remained a little known country not only for ordinary people in Europe or in the United States but also for different political analysts. One of the reason was that after World War II, it became a Stalinist state under Enver Hoxha, a communist dictator, and remained staunchly isolationist until its transition to democracy after 1990. With the collapse of communism Albania found itself facing a new security environment, including changing geopolitical situation in the Balkan region, so came with a new idea for international relations and began seeking closer ties and diplomatic relations with the West. That kind of diplomacy, oriented towards western countries, was supposed to be a solution to problems inherited from the past. At the same time this small Balkan country has striven to normalize ties especially with its neighbors. Regional cooperation was defined by Albanian government as an element that will boost and strengthen regional security. During these last two decades the main goal of Albanian foreign policy remains the same, which is the Euro-Atlantic integration, close relations with the United States and full membership in the European Union. However, Albania already reached the goal of the NATO membership on 1 April 2009 and also become an official candidate to join the European Union (June 2014).

The main aim of this lecture is to analyze the Albanian foreign policy since 1991 and show how it has evolved over time. To achieve this, I will focus on both domestic and international factors that influence Albanian foreign policy. The crucial part of the presentation will be an examination of current Albanian diplomacy under new government lead by Prime Minister Edi Rama, the leader of the Socialist Party.

Thursday, September 25

Conference -- Avoiding a Nuclear Sarajevo: Lessons from WW I for Crisis Management in the Twenty-First Century
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
University Club, Ballroom B.
Center for Russian and East European Studies
The Matthew B. Ridgway Center
Beverly Brizzi
beb38@pitt.edu

The Matthew B. Ridgway Center will host a conference entitled "Avoiding a Nuclear Sarajevo: Lessons from WW I for Crisis Management in the Twenty-First Century" from 9 am - 3 pm, Thur. Sept. 25 at the University Club, Ballroom B. The event will feature Dr. Jack Levy, a professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, and Dr. Avery Goldstein, professor of Global Politics and International Relations at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Levy will discuss “Conflicting Interests and Crisis Management in July 1914.” Dr. Goldstein will present “Crisis Instability and the Risk of US-China Military Conflict." Professor Dennis Gormley will present "Taking the Long View: 1914 and the Second Conventional Age."

RSVP to beb38@pitt.edu by Thurs., Sept. 18 to receive a complimentary lunch.

Guest Speakers
Avery Goldstein is David M. Knott Professor of Global Politics and International Relations, Director of Center for the Study of Contemporary China, and Associate Director of the Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics at the University of Pennsylvania. Goldstein’s research focuses on international relations, security studies, and Chinese politics. His books include Rising to the Challenge: China’s Grand Strategy and International Security (2005) and The Nexus of Economics, Security, and International Relations in East Asia (2012, co-edited with Edward D. Mansfield). His articles have appeared in International Security, Foreign Affairs, International Organization, the Journal of Strategic Studies, China Quarterly, Asian Survey, Comparative Politics, Orbis, Security Studies, and other journals.

Jack S. Levy is Board of Governors' Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, and an Affiliate of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. He is past-president of the International Studies Association and of the Peace Science Society. His primary research interests are the causes of war, foreign policy decision-making, and qualitative methodology. His recent publications include The Outbreak of the First World War: Structure, Politics, and Decision-Making (co-edited with John A. Vasquez, 2014); The Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology, 2nd ed. (co-edited with Leonie Huddy and David O. Sears, 2013); The Arc of War: Origins, Escalation, and Transformation (co-authored with William R. Thompson, 2011); and Causes of War (co-authored with William R. Thompson, 2010).

Lecture -- Design Thinking: Japanese Style
Bob Tobin
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
4130 Posvar
Asian Studies Center, International Business Center
free
Jacqueline Saslawsku
4126481559
jsaslawski@katz.pitt.edu

What are the elements of Japanese aesthetics and design?
How is the Japanese approach to creativity different from the American approach? How can you apply these principles to your daily life?

Dr. Robert "Bob" Tobin, emeritus professor from the Faculty of Business and Commerce at Keio University in Japan, and former director of the Program on Creativity and Change will be speaking on the Japanese approach to creativity and design. Dr. Tobin has over 20 years of experience in organizational consulting and training with global business leaders. His presentation style is strongly focused on audience participation and designed to help participants change their world view and spark their creativity.

Dr. Tobin’s book "What Do You Want to Create Today - Build the Life You Want at Work" will be available for purchase and for signing.

Presentation -- Berlin Now: The City in the Years since 1989
Peter Schneider
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
3431 Posvar Hall
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
Department of German, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
euce@pitt.edu

25 Years- Fall of the Berlin Wall

Lecture -- Berlin Now: The City in the Years since 1989
Mr. Peter Schneider, Author and Journalist
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
3431 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Department of German, Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, Film Studies Program and the World History Center
euce@pitt.edu

In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall, the EUCE/ESC and the Department of German are pleased to present a group of events to commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall. Author of the book “Berlin Now: The City After the Wall”, Peter Schneider, who moved to Berlin in 1962 and witnessed the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, visits the University of Pittsburgh to share his experiences as keen observer of Berlin. His novel Der Mauerspringer (The Wall Jumper) was first published in 1983, and has become a classic. In it he describes life in the shadow of the Wall. His new book, Berlin Now: The City after the Wall (translated by Sophie Schlondorff) is a collection of perceptive and witty essays about modern Berlin.

Lecture -- Film Festivals as a Venue for Dialog: Influences and Interactions
Sitora Alieva, Program Director, Kinotavr Film Festival
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
332 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, The Humanities Center

Friday, September 26

Seminar -- Aesthetic Practice in Recent Russian Short Films
Sitora Alieva, Program Director, Kinotavr Film Festival
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
1218 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, The Humanities Center
Panel Discussion -- International Business: Alumni and Professionals Panel
David Brand, Melissa Amler, Timothy Kraus
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
WWPH 4217
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center, International Business Center
Free
Sarah Angel Markwardt
724-562-6466
saa133@pitt.edu

University of Pittsburgh Alumni and local international business professionals will present about employment options and important skill development for those interested in careers in international business.

Sunday, September 28

Sporting Event -- Run for India at the Pittsburgh Great Race
8:00 am - 11:00 am
Fifth Avenue and Atwood Street, Oakland, Pittsburgh PA 15212
Asian Studies Center
City of Pittsburgh Great Race
412-255-2493

Team up with AID Pittsburgh to

RUN FOR INDIA on September 28, 2014

@ Pittsburgh Great Race

Seasoned runner or novice, anyone can Run for India!!

Raise money for grassroots projects funded by AID in India by running any race at Great Race.
Event details

5K Run

DATE: Sunday, September 28, 2014

START TIME: 8:00 a.m.

PLACE: Fifth Avenue and Atwood Street, Oakland

10K Run

DATE: Sunday, September 28, 2014

START TIME: 9:30 a.m.

PLACE: Beechwood Boulevard, Frick Park, Squirrel Hill

FREE Registration process

Highmark running 101 is a FREE 10 week training program - Online self guided program or Onsite location. Signing up for this training program allows you to register for Great Race for free!

1. Register with Highmark running101 here and select "Week of July 21st" and "Online"
http://pittsburgh.aidindia.org/sites/pittsburgh.aidindia.org/files/pictu...

2. Your spot in the race will be reserved. You should receive a confirmation of registration by email. After 4th week of training i.e around Aug 19th, you will receive a confirmation code.

3. Use the above confirmation code to register for Great race 5K or 10K here.

4. Register with AID at Run For India website here.

5. Share you personal webpage with your friends & family and contribute to AID's cause.
Run for India in 2014 !!!

Register today as an AID runner…
All funds raised from this event will directly benefit development projects in India, undertaken by AID Pittsburgh, related to education, healthcare, agriculture, and women's rights.
Questions? Email aidpittsburgh@gmail.com

Monday, September 29

Lecture -- Securitizing Energy in Turkey and the EU: Cheap Talk or New Policies?”
Dr. Basak Alpan, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Public Administration/Centre for European Studies, Middle East Technical University, Turkey
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Studies Association
euce@pitt.edu

Dr. Alpan, a visiting scholar in the Center’s International Research Scholar Exchange Scheme, will discuss how energy emerges as a practical security concept and is represented in policy discourses in Europe and Turkey. Ever since the end of Cold War and since 9/11 in particular, the concept of ‘security’ has experienced a profound conceptual change. This talk will examine the securitization of ‘energy’ within the EU and Turkey and its impact on from a comparative perspective.

Tuesday, September 30

Lecture -- From All Walks of Life: Revisiting the German-Speaking Presence in Yucátan (1865-1914)
Dr. Alma Durán-Merk, Author and Journalist
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Latin American Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Studies Association
Germany, University of Augsburg
euce@pitt.edu

Professor Durán-Merk comes to us as a result of Pitt’s long-standing researcher exchange agreement with Universität Augsburg in Germany, where she is a research associate at the Institute for European Ethnology and Folklore. Her primary areas of interest include migration research, visual anthropology, the anthropology of consumption, and media studies, particularly regarding relations between German and Latin American cultures. Before moving to Germany, Dr. Durán-Merk worked for several years as a television producer and writer in Monterrey, Mexico and the U.S.

Wednesday, October 1

Lecture -- The Game Theory of the Events in Ukraine
Timofiy Mylovanov, Department of Economics
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Economics

Friday, October 3

Symposium -- Symposium on Romani Music, Culture, and Human Rights in the Czech Republic and Hungary
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Music

Sunday, October 5

Cultural Event -- Mahatma Gandhi Birthday Celebration
Dr. Pankaj Jain
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Heinz chapel
Asian Studies Center
AHINSA, AID India, Chinmaya Sanjeevani Ashram, Department of Global Studies, Gujarati Samaj of Greater Pittsburgh, Hindu Jain Temple, Multicultural & Diversity Initiatives at Carnegie Mellon, Pax Christi Pittsburgh, Rotary Club of Monroeville, Silk Screen, Sri Venkateswara Temple, Sunday Morning Forum of the First Unitarian Church of...
sOm Sharma
412-856-6250

October 2nd, Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday, is the International Day of Nonviolence, per a United Nations declaration in 2007.

Join us for an afternoon of activities celebrating the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi and his teachings! Enjoy tea, snacks, and conversation with Pittsburgh organizations at the 2 p.m. reception, followed at 3 by cultural performances, inter-faith presentations, and a talk by Dr. Pankaj Jain of the University of North Texas:

Gandhi - Nonviolent Methods to Save the Planet

For details, call sOm Sharma, 412-856-6250; N. Srinivasa, 743-327-3277; or Sanjay mehta, 412-251-9133.

Monday, October 6

Lecture -- The Politics of State Support of the Russian Film Industry: A Critical Overview
Victor Matizen, Film Critic & President of the Guild of Film Scholars and Cinema Critics
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
G-13 Cathedral of Learning
Center for Russian and East European Studies
and Graduate Program for Cultural Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Film Studies Program

Thursday, October 9

Symposium -- (Re)Imagining and (Re)Interpreting Spaces, Symbols and Sites The Baltic Region from the 19th to the 21st Century
(All day)
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence
and the European Colloquium, The Humanities Center, The World History Center

For those unfamiliar with the turbulent Baltic history, historical maps from this region can be confusing. For centuries the area reclaimed by the titular nations of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, was shaped by different national and ethnic groups. Several national groups besides Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians have strong historical ties to this region, most notably Russians, (Baltic) Germans, Jews and Poles. Many Baltic cities have changed their name or their spelling more than once on the region’s maps. Names might be as different as the one for the Estonian capital of Tallinn/Reval, or simply differ in writing, as it is the case with the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, Vilno, Vilna, Vilne.

This symposium will examine the (re)mapping of Baltic landscapes and city spaces with the aim of identifying incentives for the transformation of public sites. While it is obvious that different national groups have put their stamps on the public sites of this region, it is often less clear whether the incentive for the (re)interpretation of a space or symbol was primarily a national one. One of the memorials in the Latvian capital of Riga, the monument for Janis Rainis may serve as such an example. While there can be little doubt that Rainis is remembered by Latvians as the national poet, the poet’s monument in the center of Riga was built during the Soviet era, and its purpose at that time was to commemorate Rainis first and foremost as a member of the Socialist Workers’ Party fighting for the cause of socialism during the 1905 Revolution. It was the latter symbol, which was why Russians chose Rainis’ monument as their site for protests against the school reform in 2003 and 2004 implemented to make Latvian the primary language of instruction in minority schools.

This symposium addresses processes of imagining and reimagining sites of memory and compares the interpretation of contested spaces and symbols. Papers focus on the area of today’s Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Starting with the early 19th century and covering debates up to very recent ones, the workshop explores public disputes in history and politics in the Baltic region. Special emphasis will be given to examining intersections of identities covering the political, the cultural, the social, the economic, the national as well as the transnational sphere. In a year such as 2014, full of anniversaries commemorating events, which had enormous impact on this region – from the beginning of World War I in 1914 to the tremendous changes brought about by the Eastern European Revolutions of 1989 – speakers will address the question of how key dates have impacted the (re)imagination of public spaces in this region.

The symposium will start with a keynote on Thursday, October 9th, 2014. The panels will take place on Friday, October 10, 2014. While the morning panels will concentrate on the 19th and early 20th century, the afternoon symposium will focus on recent trends in (re)interpreting public spaces in the late 20th and early 21st century, as well as the impact of the European Union as a player in the region following the EU accession of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in 2004.

All those interested are welcome to participate. If you plan to participate in the symposium on Friday, please send a short email to Kathy Gibson kag36@pitt.edu.

Friday, October 10

Lecture -- Constructing Chinese Cosmpolitanism: Southeast Asia, Overseas Chinese, and Xiamen, 1842-1937
Dr. James A. Cook
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
4130 Posvar Hall
Asian Studies Center
rej16@pitt.edu

Located on China’s southeast coast, the city of Xiamen had long stood as one of the poles of the Overseas Chinese universe; local merchants had already established a well-defined trading network as early as the 13th century, and over 2 million people departed from the city for Southeast Asia over the course of the 19th century. The global scope of Xiamen’s merchants and their trading networks, the people’s historical roots in diaspora and international commerce, and the distinctive nature of overseas “Chineseness” combined to produce a new narrative of community and development. In many ways Xiamen’s Overseas Chinese became “bridges to modernity” that moved into and out of China. Time abroad within the modernizing confines of colonial Southeast Asia led many returned-émigrés to feel that they alone understood the process of modernization and how to create a truly Chinese modernity. Ultimately their new discourse of modernization was constructed around the commercial wealth of overseas Chinese merchant life, integrated with a revamped Confucianism and a newly discovered historical tradition.

Saturday, October 11

Performance -- Music and Dance of West Java
8:00 pm
Bellefield Hall Auditorium
Asian Studies Center, Indo-Pacific Council
Department of Music
Free

A free concert featuring Musicians and Dancers from the Indonesian College of Performing Arts (STSI) in Bandung, Indonesia.

Wednesday, October 15

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Graduate Student Brown-bag
TBA
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies

Friday, October 17

Lecture Series / Brown Bag -- Split Lives: Korean-Chinese Transnational Bodies and Time
June Hee Kwon, Department of Anthropology
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Asian Studies Center

This talk examines the transnational temporality—back and forth—created by the combined effects of visa regulations, the characteristics of transnational labor, and transnational female working bodies. On the basis of ethnographic research on Korean Chinese migrant workers moving between China and Korea, I highlight the spatial division created by this repetitive migration: Korea is a place for making money, whereas China is a place for spending money; Korea is a place for working (productive labor), China is a place for resting (reproductive labor). Under this split in spatial practices, I argue, migrants have internalized a rhythm—a back and forth—that serves as a governing force on the laboring body, thereby making care for the body more difficult, and prolonging its exploitation in intensive labor.

Wednesday, October 22

Cultural Event -- 6th Annual East European Festival
6:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Assembly Room, William Pitt Union
Center for Russian and East European Studies
& Ukrainian clubs, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and..., the REES Undergraduate Student Association, Turkish
Free
Anna Talone
ant28@pitt.edu

Tuesday, October 28

Lecture -- Trotsky, Bureaucracy, and Capitalist Restoration
Thomas Twiss
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies

Friday, October 31

Lecture -- Asia in the World Histories: Frontiers and Environments
Peter Perdue, Yale University
12:00 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center
World History Center
World History Center
412-624-3073
worldhis@pitt.edu

Because of the dramatic growth of Asian economies, the salience of Asia among world historians has risen significantly in the past decades. We can see this prominence in the greater space devoted to Asia in world history textbooks, curricula, and to some extent in faculty positions. Yet because of the lingering influence of Eurocentrism and the constraints imposed by traditional Area Studies, gaps and discrepancies remain. To point towards ways of overcoming these limitations, I will comment on recent work in China in the early modern and modern period, from the perspective of frontiers and environmental history.

Film -- The Memory Project and New Voices in Chinese Documentary
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Langley Hall A224
Asian Studies Center
and Humanities Center, Department of English, Film Studies Programs

WU Wenguang, one of the founding figures in Chinese independent documentary, brings three young filmmakers from China to present their collective work, “the Memory Project.” The project is based at Coachangdi Workstation in Beijing. From there, young filmmakers fanned out to return to family villages and their own pasts, real and imagined, to inquire about The Great Famine of 1959-61 — a disaster of whose memories have been actively abandoned by the state. Aiming to create a “folk memory archive,” the project, which combines documentary films, oral history records, and live performances, presents an alternative narrative of Chinese history than the one written in official textbooks. As these young filmmakers search for the distant memory from an old generation that is still living in rural poverty, their encounter with the past reveals as much about the wish for memory as of memory itself and of the interesting role of film in such projects of retrieval..

THE FILMS:

Self-Portrait and Three Women (2010, 70min)

Directed by Zhang Mengqi.

The filmmaker’s statement:

This year I turned 23, the age when women become pregnant with dreams. Yet, even while nursing our own dreams, we must carry the burden of two other women’s dreams as well. This film begins with my own search, then delving into my mother and her mother, where blood has flowed through three generations, in these women who grew up in different times. As a victim of an oppressive marriage, my grandmother held hopes for my mother to

have a happy marriage. When my mother became a victim herself, she turned those hopes to me. Marriage may be every girl’s dream, but it is also the murderer of those dreams.

Self-Portrait: At 47 KM (2011, 77min)

Directed by Zhang Mengqi.

The filmmaker’s statement:

After my first documentary Self-portrait and Three Women, my second “self-portrait” was painted in a village named “47 KM.” This village is located 47 KM from Suizhou, Hubei Province, where my father was born. He left the village when he was 20, but his father, my grandfather, still lives there. In the summer and winter of 2010, through my participation in the “Folk Memory Project”, I went back to the village, which seems disconnected from my current life, and re-discovered and came to better understand my grandfather, the old villagers who underwent the disaster of the famine fifty years ago, as well as the village, which always perplexed and embarrassed me. What does “47 KM” really mean to me? It seems to be a mirror, I see myself in front of it.

THE FILMMAKERS:
Zhang Mengqi was born in 1987. She graduated from the Dance Academy at the Minzu University of China in 2008. Since 2009, she has been a resident artist at CCD Workstation. Her four documentary films, Self-portrait with Three Women (2010), Self-Portrait: At 47 KM (2011), Self-portrait: Dancing at 47 KM (2012), and Self-Portrait: Dreaming at 47 KM (2013), complete her “self-portrait series”

Saturday, November 1

Film -- The Memory Project and New Voices in Chinese Documentary
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Langley Hall A224
Asian Studies Center
Confucius Institute, Department of English, Film Studies Program, Humanities Center

WU Wenguang, one of the founding figures in Chinese independent documentary, brings three young filmmakers from China to present their collective work, “the Memory Project.” The project is based at Coachangdi Workstation in Beijing. From there, young filmmakers fanned out to return to family villages and their own pasts, real and imagined, to inquire about The Great Famine of 1959-61 — a disaster of whose memories have been actively abandoned by the state. Aiming to create a “folk memory archive,” the project, which combines documentary films, oral history records, and live performances, presents an alternative narrative of Chinese history than the one written in official textbooks. As these young filmmakers search for the distant memory from an old generation that is still living in rural poverty, their encounter with the past reveals as much about the wish for memory as of memory itself and of the interesting role of film in such projects of retrieval..

Time: November 1 (Saturday), 1 pm- 5 pm
Location: LANGLEY HALL A224
Screening and Discussion
Discussants: Jinying Li, Neepa Majumdar, Robert Clift

(1:00 pm - 2:16 pm) Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013, 76min) Directed by Li Xinmin
(2:30 pm - 3:55 pm) Children's Village (2012, 85min) Directed by Zou Xueping
(4:10 pm - 5:00 pm) Discussion with filmmakers Wu Wenguang, Zou Xueping, Li Xinmin, Zhang Mengqi and Pitt faculty Jinying Li, Neepa Majumdar, and Robert Clift.

THE FILMS:
Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013, 76min)
Directed by Li Xinmin
The filmmaker’s statement:
This film is about a four-year-old boy, Xiaoqiang. His mother, Xiaoqun, is just of my age. I filmed Xiaoqun and her family last year. This year I went back filming her son Xiaoqiang who I found so interesting. We hung out together and picked up garbage in the village, witnessing the real life of old villagers and the damage they did to the environment.

Children's Village (2012, 85min)
Directed by Zou Xueping
The filmmaker’s statement:
In the winter of 2012, I returned to my village to continue interviewing elderly villagers. Meanwhile, I began investigating and gathering statistics on those who died during the Great Famine. I also started fund-raising to build a memorial for those who died. Many village children, from 10-15 years old, voluntarily joined these activities. They took the DV camera I gave them, visited old folks, interviewed them, and collected statistics and donations. This project gave them their first opportunity to learn about and appreciate the history of their village. Assisted by these "little angels," I no longer felt lonely in the village. I started seeing hope for the future. This film forms an important part of my Zou Village series.

THE FILMMAKERS:
Zou Xueping was born in Bingzhou City, Shandong Province, in 1985. In 2009 she graduated from the Department of New Media at the China Academy of Fine Arts. She is currently a resident artist at Wu Wenguang's Caochangdi (CCD) Workshop in Beijing. She has completed a documentary series centered on her home Village, including Mom (2008), The Starving Village (2010), Satiated Village (2011) which won an “Award of Excellence” at Beijing Independent Film Festival 2012, Children's Village (2012) and Trash Village (2013).

Li Xinmin was born in a mountain village in Yunnan Province in 1988. Her formal education stopped at the fifth grade due to poverty. At the age of 16, she began working as a migrant worker in the city to provide for her rural family. Since 2007, she has been working in CCD Workstation and completed documentary films Back to Huamulin (2011), Huamulin 2012 (2012) and Huamulin, Boy Xiaoqiang (2013).

Wednesday, November 12

Lecture -- Marketing, Product Placement, Crowd Sourcing, and the Capitalism of New Russian Cinema
Richard Beach Gray, PhD Student, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
4217 Posvar Hall
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Monday, November 17

Film -- Film screening: Magicky hlas rebelky (The Magical Voice of a Rebel)
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Center for Russian and East European Studies, International Week, Nationality Rooms
Honorary Consul of the Czech Embassy
Free
Gina Peirce
412-648-2290
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

This is the final film in the series, "The Play's the Thing: Vaclav Havel, Art and Politics," presented at Pitt by the Czechoslovak Nationality Room courtesy of the Czech Embassy. "Magicky hlas rebelky" is a 2014 documentary about the Czech singer Marta Kubisova, who has become a symbol in the Czech Republic of the period in history known as the Velvet Revolution (1989), when a mass protest movement led to the fall of communism in Czechoslovakia. The film includes segments of members of the dissident organization Charter 77, including former Czech President Vaclav Havel. It received the audience award at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival this year and is currently showing in movie theaters throughout the Czech Republic. The producers are making screenings available in the U.S. in commemoration of the 25th year since the Velvet Revolution. This film is in Czech with English subtitles.

Friday, November 21

Lecture -- Making Mosques in America and Japan; or, How Islam Went Truly Global
Nile Green, University of California, Los Angeles
12:00 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center
Humanities Center
World History Center
412-624-3073
worldhis@pitt.edu

In the early 1920s and 30s, the first purpose-built mosques were established in the United States and Japan. Despite being on the far sides of the planet in Detroit and Kobe, their foundation reflected the ability of South Asian Muslim "religious entrepreneurs" to operate on what was by the 1920s a truly global scale. In tracing the commonalities between this first institutional emergence of Islam in two new world regions, the lecture identifies the global processes of religious competition and exchange and the reasons why Indian Muslims emerged at the forefront of them.

Thursday, April 2

Lecture -- Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers' Series: Peter Hessler
Peter Heslsler, 2014/15 William Block Sr. Award Winner
8:30 pm
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Asian Studies Center
Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, University Store on Fifth
412-624-6508

Peter Hessler has received the 2008 National Magazine Award for Excellence in Reporting, a 2011 Macarthur Fellowship, and the 2001 Kiriyama Prize. He is the author of River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze; Country Driving: A Chinese Road Trip; Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West; and Oracle Bones: A Journey through Time in China, a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award. He is a contributing writer for National Geographic and a staff writer at The New Yorker, for which he has served as the Beijing, China correspondent from 2000 to 2007 and currently covers Egypt.