Events

UCIS Event Listings | UCIS Central Calendar

Tuesday, January 16

Feminist Posthumanism and Life in the Abyss
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Stacy Alaimo, Distinguished Teaching Professor, University of Texas- Arlington
Location:
501G Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Cultural Studies, Department of English, GSWS Program, The Humanities Center and the Literature Program
Contact:
Nancy Glazener
Contact Email:
glazener@pitt.edu

Join Distinguished Teaching Professor Stacy Alaimo from the University of Texas Arlington for her talk this January at Pitt. Prof. Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of the environmental humanities and gender studies. She has published three monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell UP, 2000);
Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana UP, 2010); and Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pressures in Posthuman Times (U of Minnesota P, 2016). Bodily Natures won the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) Award for Ecocriticism in 2011 and was featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy in 2013. Alaimo also coedited Material Feminisms (Indiana UP 2008), and her edited collection Matter is forthcoming in 2017 (Macmillan). She is known for developing the concept of "trans-corporeality," a concept widely in circulation and included as a key term in Rosi Braidotti's The Posthuman Glossary (2017). Her current book project is entitled "Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss."

Graduate students may also attend a lunchtime colloquium with Professor Alaimo from 11:00am- 1:00pm in 501G in the Cathedral. Contact Nancy Glazener (glazener@pitt.edu) to RSVP, get access to readings, and to convey dietary restrictions.

Thursday, January 18

Consistently Invisible? Women's News Media Coverage during the European Elections, 1999-2014"
Time:
2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Presenter:
Maarja Luhiste, Newcastle University
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact Email:
europeanstudies@pitt.edu

Funded by the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

Friday, January 19

Support for Democracy in Decline: The LAPOP Americas Barometer 2016/17
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
by Dr. Mitchell Seligson
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with and the University Center for International Studies (UCIS)
Contact:
Kelsey Trimm
Contact Email:
ket82@pitt.edu

Mitchell A. Seligson is the Centennial Professor of Political Science, Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor, and Professor of Sociology (by courtesy) at Vanderbilt
University and Founder and Senior Advisor of Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP), which conducts the AmericasBarometer surveys that cur rently covers over 30 countries in the Americas. Seligson has carried out hundreds of surveys of public opinion, mainly focused on democracy and governance, in many countries in Latin America, but has also included projects in Africa and the Balkans. For details, see www.LapopSurveys.org.He currently is an elected member of the General Assembly of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights. Over the past decade, he has been awarded over $25nmillion in research grants and contracts. To read more about Dr. Mitchell Seligson visit:
https://www.vanderbilt.edu/political- science/bio/mitchell- seligson

Lunch will be provided.

for more information contact: ket82@pitt.edu

Wednesday, January 24

Conversations on Europe - Wind, Water, Sun: Clean Energy in Europe
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, January 25

EUSA Roundtable: “Will the EU Fall Apart?”
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and European Union Studies Association
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Speakers will include: Abe Newman, Frederic Merand, Matthias Matthijs, and Rachel Epstein

Co-sponsored by European Union Studies Association

Biopolitics, Mobility, and the Politics of Migrant Dispersal
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Martina Tazzioli
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center

Dr. Tazzioli is a Lecturer in the Geography Department at Swansea University and Visiting Lecturer in Forced Migration at City University of London. She is the author of Spaces of Governmentality: Autonomous Migration and the Arab Uprisings (2014), co-author with Glenda Garelli of Tunisia as a Revolutionized Space of Migration (2016), and co-editor of Foucault and the History of Our Present (2015). She is co-founder of the journal Materialifoucaultian.

Friday, January 26

Best Practices Showcasing Globalization Across the Curriculum
Time:
8:30 am to 2:00 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4126487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This conference will bring together Pennsylvania faculty with peers affiliated with the Nine University and College International Consortium of Georgia for a workshop on innovative ways to internationalize curricula at community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

To attend, please register by January 19, 2018 via https://tinyurl.com/yaf5hjod.

DEVOURING SOUTH ASIA: Appetites, Cuisine, and Health
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Surupa Gupta
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

Saturday, January 27

Mithai Indian Sweets Tasting
Time:
2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Location:
Cloister, Frick Fine Arts Building
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

We will offer many different types of Indian sweets to taste and learn about sweets making and the significance of sweets in South Asia.

Tuesday, February 6

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Farming of the Bones by Edwidge Danticat
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Felix Germain
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Phone:
4126243487
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session, we will be reading Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of the Bones and hear from Pitt Prof. Felix Germain (Africana Studies).

Thursday, February 15

Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Susan Bibler Coutin
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center

Wednesday, February 21

Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Friday, February 23 to Saturday, February 24

Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Time:
8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

Friday, February 23

CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Time:
5:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

Wednesday, February 28

The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.

Thursday, March 1

Early Works - Screening
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

Early Works (Serbian: Rani radovi, 90 min) is a 1969 Yugoslavian film by Serbian director Želimir Žilnik. It critically depicts the aftermath of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. It won the Golden Bear at the 19th Berlin International Film Festival in 1969. The title was borrowed from the popular anthology of the early work by Marx and Engels published first in Yugoslavia in 1953. These early texts had a significant influence on the development of the Yugoslav Praxis School of philosophy. The title was chosen ironically as a comment on the discrepancy between the theory, as expressed by Marx and Engels in their work, and practice, as implemented by the Soviet Union and other countries of real socialism.

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Time:
4:45 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Early Works (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Vladimir Padunov, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Discussants: Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Wednesday, March 14

Conversations on Europe - Elections in Italy: A Next Wave for Populism?
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Part of the ESC Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series and its series of Virtual Roundtables, Conversations on Europe.

Thursday, March 15

Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Michael White
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center

Thursday, March 29

Climate Change and Protest (tentative)
Time:
2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Presenter:
Stacy VanDeveer, University of Massachusetts Boston
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact Email:
europeanstudies@pitt.edu

Funded through the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

Wednesday, April 4

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Jeanette Jouili
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session we will read Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie and hear from Pitt Prof. Jeanette Jouili (Religious Studies).

Friday, April 13

European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Various
Location:
Location to be announced
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Gina Peirce
Contact Phone:
4126482290
Contact Email:
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Wednesday, April 18

Conversations on Europe - May 1968: Legacies of Protest in France
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

The Conversation on Europe virtual roundtable is part of the UCIS Series on the Anniversary of 1968 and the ESC Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

Tuesday, May 1

CCA International Marketing Competition
Time:
12:00 pm
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
4126485085
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

The Global Studies Center and the International Business Center work with high school language and social sciences teachers to introduce international business concepts to students through an international marketing competition. It culminates in an interscholastic competition hosted by the Global Studies Center and the IBC at Pitt, where students present their marketing plans in front of fellow competitors and a panel of judges from the academic and business communities, as well as answer audience questions. The teams that win first, second and third place in the final each receive awards recognizing their hard work.

Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29

2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers
Time:
8:30 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Business Center
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4176487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Make college more affordable for your high school students—and help them grow as global citizens and 21st century professional—while earning ACT 48 professional development credits.

The College in High School program and the University Center for International Studies will host a summer institute for secondary educators interested in teaching globally focused courses that offer transferable college credit to students at their high school. Courses in which you can obtain certification and training may include:

Intermediate French I-II
Intermediate German I-II
Intermediate Spanish I-II
Intro to Global Studies
Latin Intermediate Prose and Verse
Western Civilization II
World History
World Politics
Imperial Russia

Courses will be aligned with Pennsylvania Core and Academic Standards (for social studies) or ACTFL performance standards (for world languages).

The 2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers is funded through generous support from the Longview Foundation for Education in World Affairs and International Understanding (https://longviewfdn.org/).

For more information and to apply, visit chs.pitt.edu/sipt.