Week of February 7, 2021 in UCIS

Friday, February 5 until Sunday, February 7

(All day) Lecture
Mini-Course--Transforming Cities: Cities & Sustainability
Location:
Virtual - Register Online!
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Carnegie Mellon University
See Details

This course will bring together the expertise of faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, as well as practitioners to provide a multidisciplinary approach to the interconnections between health and sustainability, the role cities can have on climate change, low-emission growth, and clean energy, the importance of access to resources, the need for sustainable transportation, and the practices of sustainable consumption, among others.

Monday, February 8

3:00 pm Panel Discussion
Charlemos Series: China in Latin America: Economic Dependency and Public Opinion
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Latin American Political Institutions Section LASA
See Details

The tenth Charlemos event will take place on Monday, February 8, 2021 at 3 pm. The topic of discussion will be "China in Latin America: Economic Dependency and Public Opinion. Barbara Stallings (Brown University) will discuss her paper, "A Dependency Perspective on the United States, China, and Latin America" and Scott Morgenstern (University of Pittsburgh) will discuss his forthcoming paper (co-authored with Asbel Bohigues, University of Salamanca), "Battling for the Hearts and Minds of Latin Americans: Covariance of Attitudes Towards the United States and China." Javier Corrales (Amherst College) will moderate the discussion.

To read copies of the papers, please visit: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/content/charlemos

Registration is required: https://tinyurl.com/yyyxfoyq

5:30 pm Teacher Training
K-16 Mini-Course for Educators
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center and National Consortium on Teaching About Asia
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This free, cross-disciplinary mini-course for K-12 educators will explore the global water crisis through attention to its geo-political, cultural, economic, and technological aspects, with particular attention to scholars and practitioners working within the environmental, political, and technological framework to address these challenges using a people-centered approach. Special attention will be given to the case of East Asia. The programs will be conducted by Zoom. You can sign up for one or all of these presentations. Benefits for K-16 educators: educators who attend all three sessions will receive a Certificate of Completion and a set of materials for their classrooms. Pennsylvania educators who want Act 48 hours must attend all three sessions.

Registration link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScQR03C0s3FKnEUmI65GqXMqWcoT4OJ...

Tuesday, February 9

4:30 pm Lecture
On Intergenerational Queer Kinship and the Frail Body of August von Platen
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of German
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August von Platen’s (1796–1835) name appears regularly in queer German print culture around 1900. Following the highly advertised publication of the famed poet’s diaries in 1896 and then in 1900, sexologists and admirers took up the culture of reading his work for traces of the queer life he led. This talk explores one such project: Xavier Mayne’s The Intersexes: A History of Similisexualism as a Problem in Social Life (1910), which includes an extensive biography of Platen. This talk will examine how the crafting of Platen’s body in this text—an embodiment through words—played a central role in imagining an ideal queerness venerated by Mayne and much of the writing about Platen around 1900.

Ervin Malakaj is Assistant Professor of German Studies at the University of British Columbia. His scholarship focuses on German media studies, queer studies, and critical university studies. He is the co-editor with Regine Criser of Diversity and Decolonization in German Studies (2020, Palgrave)

STUDENT CAPSTONE PRESENTATIONS 4:00PM EST
Capstone Senior Seminar Research Projects: Chloe Abele, Meghan Fanning, Samantha Good, Anna Hudson, Jacob Kuzy, Ingrid Miller, Max Nowalk, Lauren Towner, Anne Marie Yurik

7:00 pm Film
It Came From the Archives! Unearthed Treasures from the George A. Romero Archival Collection
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with University Library System
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Join Horror Studies Collection Coordinator Ben Rubin and Visiting Researcher Adam Hart as they discuss their favorite and most significant discoveries from processing the George A. Romero Archival Collection. Rare and never before seen materials will shed new light on Romero’s classic films as well as reveal the films that could have been through unfinished and lost projects. Event hosted by the University Library System.

Registration link: https://calendar.pitt.edu/event/unearthed#.YB1Pki2caw6

Wednesday, February 10

(All day) Film
Queer Horror Film Club with Marian Phillips: Queer Love
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

Part of an ongoing Spring 2021 discussion on queer horror film. Marian Phillips of the Horror Studies Working Group will lead an hour-long discussion on a film.

11:00 am Information Session
African Studies Program Virtual Office Hours
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Hub
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Meet with African Studies Program Student Ambassador Emmanuel Ampofo to ask questions about the African Studies Certificate, upcoming events, and more.

Meet via Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/97841843639

12:00 pm Lecture
Conquering Nature: Russian Expansion to the Brink
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
See Details

A live interview with Sharyl Corrado (Pepperdine University) and Paul Josephson (Colby College).

Register via Zoom here: https://pitt.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYlf-qprj8pHtx2o_g4viWfhVARGW1HW06K

The existential threat of climate change has inspired renewed intellectual engagement with the Anthropocene. Eurasian Studies are no exception to this trend. In the last decade, studies that grapple with the past, present, and potential future of the human-nature dialectic are on the uptick. These studies have forced us to reconsider intellectual and ideological paradigms, sources, mission, and role of scholar in society.

Nature’s Revenge: Ecology, Animals, and Waste in Eurasia seeks to bring some of this scholarship and activism to a wider public through a series of live-recorded interviews. The goal is to illuminate recent scholarship and complicate our understanding of the Eurasian Anthropocene and its place in our world.

5:00 pm Cultural Event
La Parlotte: French Conversation Club
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Department of French & Italian Languages and Literatures
See Details

Chat with other French students, French faculty, and PhD students and practice your French language skills. Email PhD student Pat Nikiema at PAN32@pitt.edu for the Zoom link.

6:30 pm Lecture
Asia Pop Series: Videation
Location:
Online via Zoom
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
See Details

Please join us on 2/10 @ 6:30 pm for the keynote lecture of the 2021 Asia Pop series with Dr. Joshua Neves of Concordia University. His talk pursues a series of speculations about Asian video cultures since the 1990s along three main lines of inquiry. First, it situates recent attention to internet and mobile video practices within a longer history. Second, the presentation reflects on key insights drawn from his research into the cultural and geopolitics of video technologies. Finally he turns to contemporary video forms and practices on the internet and social media tracing a range of issues about short video aesthetics, popular politics, platformization, and global tensions. Register for this virtual event here.

Thursday, February 11

12:30 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
‘Inescapable Liabilities’: Locating Algeria in European Integration’s History
Location:
Zooom
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
See Details

JMEUCE Lecture Series:
This talk places empire and decolonization at the heart of the history of European integration. When French officials came to the negotiating table to help found the European Economic Community (EEC), their sovereignty over Algeria was a paramount concern. As a result, they demanded that their European collaborators agree to name Algeria in the treaty establishing the EEC. This held unintended consequences before and after Algeria’s independence. Algeria’s exit from Europe proved plodding and uneven, demonstrating both the range of possibilities for what the shape of integrated Europe might have been and also the slow process of decolonization.

Megan Brown
Department of History, Swarthmore University

1:00 pm Lecture
Let's Talk Africa: The Past, Present, and Future of Women and Law in Africa
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
See Details

Come join The Honorable Ari Tobi, renowned speaker and writer. This conversation will focus on the pre-colonial to postcolonial experiences of African women in law, from a jurisprudential viewpoint.

3:15 pm Cultural Event
Laber Rhabarber - German Conversation Hour
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Department of German
See Details

Laber Rhabarber - More than a German conversation hour!

"... the most human thing we have is language, and we have it in order to talk." German author Theodor Fontane wrote in 1892. So, here's chance! Be human with us for an hour every week, albeit in German ;D

Everyone and every level of German welcome!

Zoom Meeting link: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/99661883076
German Dept. website: http://www.german.pitt.edu/
Follow us on Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @UPittGerman

Friday, February 12 until Saturday, February 13

9:00 am Conference
GOSECA 18th Annual Conference
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies

Friday, February 12

10:30 am Reading Group
Emerging Latinx Communities Reading Group
Location:
Online (Zoom)
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Center for Health Equity
See Details

CLAS & the Center for Health Equity co-sponsor this reading group. We will discuss the conclusion of Matthew H. Rafalow's "Digital divisions: How schools create inequality in the tech era". The book chapter talks about technology, play, and discipline and how it plays in different environments. Pitt has access to this book.

With the support of the Center for Latin American Studies, we explore 1) the problems Latinos in small yet rapidly growing populations face, and 2) how to solve those problems. We hope to get new writing and research collaborations going! Open to all interested: students, faculty, staff, and practitioners from Pitt and beyond. If you want to get extra network time, we will be there 30 minutes before and after the meeting time.

Link: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/98312512267
Meeting Passcode: Latinx

1:00 pm Cultural Event
Russian Language Tutoring
Location:
Online
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
See Details

Russian tutoring available for students by appointment.

Book your appointment here: https://calendly.com/katya-kovaleva/russian-language-tutoring

2:00 pm Lecture Series / Brown Bag
New Directions in Research: Race, Gender, and Indigeneity in the American Arctic and Siberia
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies, University of Chicago, Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, University of Michigan, Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Center for Slavic and East European Studies, Ohio State University, Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Russian and East European Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington and Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University
See Details

2:00-3:30 pm (ET) | 1:00-2:30 pm (CT) | 12:00-1:30 (MT) | 11:00 am-12:30 pm (PT)

MODERATOR:
Manduhai Buyandelger, MIT

PRESENTATIONS:
"Big Noses, Angry Babushki, Mixed Messages: Racialized Expectations of Linguistic and Cultural Performance in Asian Russia"
Kathryn Graber, Indiana University, Bloomington

"Gender Articulations from Decolonial Indigenous Perspectives in the Russian and American Arctic"
Olga Ulturgasheva, University of Manchester

This event will be recorded and streamed live on the ASEEES Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/slavic.e.european.eurasian.studies/)

REGISTER IN ADVANCE: https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/creees/race-in-focus

This event is part of the series "Race in Focus: From Critical Pedagogies to Research Practice and Public Engagement in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies." This series is designed to elevate conversations about teaching on race and continued disparities in our field while also bringing scholars from underrepresented minorities and/or research on communities of color to the center stage.

3:00 pm Student Club Activity
German Club Meeting
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Global Hub along with Pitt German Club
See Details

Join the Pitt German Club every Friday at 3PM to practice your German language skills and learn about different aspects of German culture!

Zoom ID: 950 0542 1812

4:15 pm Colloquium
Panoramas Round Table: Lithium Mining in South America: A Double Edged Sword of Sustainability
Location:
Online (Zoom)
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas
See Details

With lithium-ion batteries powering electric cars, lithium mining is likely to be a high-demand industry in the coming years. Much of the world’s lithium is found in the Lithium Triangle in Chile, Argentina, and Bolivia. While at face value mining in the Lithium Triangle may be a good economic opportunity to power a more environmentally friendly means of transportation, the impact that it has on the environment and local communities raises the question of how sustainable it really is.

Abby Neiser is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh majoring in Political Science and Spanish with a minor in Portuguese and a Certificate in Latin American Studies. During the summer of 2019, she studied abroad in Cuba as part of the Pitt in Cuba program. She is also the President of the Luso-Brazilian Student Association at Pitt. She is one of the 2020-2021 Panoramas Interns.

Article Link

Registration Link: https://tinyurl.com/yxex3ghz

5:00 pm Lecture
Communism's Shadow: Historical Legacies and Political Attitudes
Location:
Zoom
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia
See Details

Keynote Lecture for the GOSECA 18th Annual Conference by Dr. Joshua Tucker (Professor of Politics, New York University).
REGISTER HERE: https://pitt.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUtc-yrpjwpG9yMujkrMrfQSnHY8O8tBjii

Saturday, February 13

(All day) Film
My Bloody Valentine 40th Anniversary Celebration
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
See Details

GARF Network talks with cast and crew of the classic slasher film to celebrate the 40th anniversary of its release.