Events

UCIS Event Listings | UCIS Central Calendar

Monday, January 22

Regionalism Resurgent: Political Machines and Labor Migration in Russia
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Colin Johnson, UCIS Postdoctoral Fellow
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

The centralization of political and economic power in Russia has been a theme of Vladimir Putin's reign, gaining control over regional governments through the Kremlin's party of power, United Russia. Against this trend of curtailing contests of federalism, migration policy has emerged as a policy arena in which we observe regions claiming authority against the federal government. Through a qualitative investigation of four regions, this research argues that migration policy will remain a conduit for regions to secure political power for the foreseeable future, as Russia maintains its position as host to the world's third-largest immigrant population.

Occupation, Deportation, Genocide - Agents of Memory in Post-Soviet Latvia
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Katja Wezel, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall- History Department Lounge
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of

Chapter presented by Katja Wezel (DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh) with comments by Jonathan Harris (University of Pittsburgh) and Emanuala Grama (CMU).

Tuesday, January 23

Fictional Narrations of Islamic Pasts
Inaugural Lecture of The Islamicate Studies Working Group at the University of Pittsburgh
Time:
12:30 pm
Presenter:
Shahzad Bashir, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Humanities, Brown University
Location:
Humanities Center, Cathedral of Learning 602
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Islamicate Studies Working Group at the University of Pittsburgh
Contact:
Grace Tomcho
Contact Email:
gracet@pitt.edu

Lunch Provided

The Islamicate Studies Working Group consists of faculty and staff at the University of Pittsburgh who are exploring the prospects of building an academic program for the study of the Muslim World. Its members come from the Dietrich School’s departments of English; History; Linguistics; Religious Studies; and Sociology; as well as from the Law School; the School of Education; and staff members from the Library and Global Studies, and it incorporates visiting postdoctoral fellows faculty members.

Wednesday, January 24

Conversations on Europe - Wind, Water, Sun: Clean Energy in Europe
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies Series
Koyo Kouoh
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Koyo Kouoh
Location:
4801 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and Global Studies Center along with History of Art and Architecture Department as part of Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Carnegie Museum of Art.
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Phone:
624-3487
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

Visiting scholar Koyo Kouoh will offer a brief presentation and lead a discussion on RAW Acádemie, an experimental program for artistic thought and curatorial inquiry that she recently launched as part of the activities of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge, and society in Dakar, Senegal.

Suggested reading: Koyo Kouoh, “Being Africa: Contextual Narratives of Artistic Environments,” in Paul O'Neill, et al, eds., The Curatorial Conundrum: What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice? (LUMA Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, distributed by MIT Press, 2016), 181–188.
Link to PDF: https://pitt.box.com/s/inue7nluqaejo7d9d8boc8uguyl925f9

Biography: Koyo Kouoh is the founding artistic director of RAW Material Company, a center for art, knowledge and society in Dakar, Senegal (www.rawmc.org). For Carnegie International, 57th edition, 2018, Kouoh is participating with Dig Where You Stand, an exhibition within the exhibition based on the Carnegie Museum of Art’s collection. Previously, she was the curator of 1:54 FORUM, the educational programme at the Contemporary African Art Fair in London and New York, and served in the curatorial teams for documenta 12 (2007) and documenta 13 (2012). Kouoh was also the curator of “Still (the) Barbarians,” 37th EVA International, Ireland’s Biennial in Limerick (2016); “Streamlines: Oceans, Global Trade and Migration,” Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2015); “Body Talk: Feminism, Sexuality and the Body in the work of six African women artists,” WIELS, Lunds Konsthall, 49N6E FRAC Lorraine (2015–2016); and “Precarious Imaging: Visibility surrounding African Queerness,” RAW Material Company (2014). She edited Word!Word?Word! Issa Samb and the undecipherable form, RAW Material Company/OCA/Sternberg Press (2013), the first monograph dedicated to the work of seminal Senegalese artist Issa Samb; Condition Report on Building Art Institutions in Africa, a collection of essays resulting from the eponymous symposium held in Dakar in January 2012; and Chronicle of a Revolt: Photographs of a Season of Protest, RAW Material Company & Haus der Kulturen der Welt (2012). Besides a sustained theoretical, exhibition, and residency program at RAW Material Company, she maintains a critical curatorial, advisory and judging activity internationally. She lives and works in Dakar and Basel.

Thursday, January 25

Muslim Internationalism and Pan-Islamic Ideas During the Cold War
Time:
12:30 pm
Presenter:
Cemil Aydin, Professor of History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Location:
Sociology Colloquium Room, Posvar Hall 2431
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Islamicate Studies Working Group at the University of Pittsburgh
Contact:
Grace Tomcho
Contact Email:
gracet@pitt.edu

The Colloquium discusses the origins of contemporary Islamist narratives of world order in the global Cold War context of the 1970s and 1980s. Prof. Aydin argues that the political movement of Islamism emerged as a transnational ideological movement only in the last two decades of the cold war. Both anti-Western Islamism and Islamophobic discourses in the West carry the characteristics of the Cold War ideological battles. Islamism carries the formative influence of universalist claims and double standards of cold war ideological rivalries. Modern Pan-Islamic narratives, he argues, are modern constructs that emerged in the intertwined crisis of the cold war and decolonization processes. This attention to Cold War can also help us better understand how an imagined Muslim world began to be depicted as the new enemy of the West in Islamophobic ideologies after the Cold war.

Lunch provided
*Attendees are encouraged to read the colloquium materials ahead of the event. They may be requested by writing to Prof. Mohammed Bamyeh at mab205@pitt.edu.

The Islamicate Studies Working Group consists of faculty and staff at the University of Pittsburgh who are exploring the prospects of building an academic program for the study of the Muslim World. Its members come from the Dietrich School’s departments of English; History; Linguistics; Religious Studies; and Sociology; as well as from the Law School; the School of Education; and staff members from the Library and Global Studies, and it incorporates visiting postdoctoral fellows faculty members.

Uganda Field Seminar & Internship- summer 2018
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Louis Picard
Location:
TBD
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

In Summer 2018, you can join this field-based seminar and internship opportunity counting towards your African Studies Program certificate and graduation! Applications are being accepted. Come to the info session on 1/25 at 3PM (grads and undergrads from any school/department). If you are interested in attending, email Kelsey at kew132@pitt.edu.

EUSA Roundtable: “Will the EU Fall Apart?”
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and European Union Studies Association
Cost:
Free and open to the public, Advanced registration requested
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Speakers will include: Abe Newman, Frederic Merand, Matthias Matthijs, and Rachel Epstein

Free and open to the Public
-Advanced registration is requested via https://eusa_roundtable.eventbrite.com

Co-sponsored by the European Union Studies Association, European Horizons – Pitt Chapter, and the German American Chamber of Commerce

Topic: Temporary Protected Status: Origins, Policy, and Implications of Termination 
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Panoramas
Location:
CLAS Reception Area!
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Panoramas at CLAS/UCIS
Contact:
CLAS
Contact Phone:
8-7391
Contact Email:
clas@pitt.edu

Pizza will be provided.https://www.google.com/search?q=immigration&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ve...
http://www.panoramas.pitt.edu/
Sponsored by Panoramas and the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) 

Biopolitics, Mobility, and the Politics of Migrant Dispersal
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Martina Tazzioli
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center

Dr. Tazzioli is a Lecturer in the Geography Department at Swansea University and Visiting Lecturer in Forced Migration at City University of London. She is the author of Spaces of Governmentality: Autonomous Migration and the Arab Uprisings (2014), co-author with Glenda Garelli of Tunisia as a Revolutionized Space of Migration (2016), and co-editor of Foucault and the History of Our Present (2015). She is co-founder of the journal Materialifoucaultian. Her talk will focus on the Political aspects of Migrant Dispersal and the way biopolotics and mobility factor into migration today.

Institution Building as Curatorial Practice
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Koyo Kouoh; introduced by Carnegie International curator Ingrid Schaffner and followed by questions and discussion.
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office and Global Studies Center along with History of Art and Architecture Department as part of Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Carnegie Museum of Art.

For many countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, cultural production was historically co-opted by the state in anti-colonial struggles and post-colonial nation building, paving the way for decades of tension between private initiatives and government mechanisms. The situation has changed but hardly for the better, with many states neglecting the financial and infrastructural needs of their country’s cultural landscapes. Yet within this void, the last twenty years have born witness to the flourishing of independent, non-commercial art centers across these zones. In developing an expanded curatorial practice that embraces the institution as form, in contexts where aesthetics and knowledge production often escape Western paradigms, such spaces allow for new understandings of the potential of arts organizations as well as the relationship between art and life.

Friday, January 26

Best Practices Showcasing Globalization Across the Curriculum
Time:
8:30 am to 3:00 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
548 William Pitt Union
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4126487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

This conference will bring together Pennsylvania faculty with peers affiliated with the Nine University and College International Studies Consortium of Georgia for a workshop on innovative ways to internationalize curricula at community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

To attend, please register by January 19, 2018 via https://tinyurl.com/yaf5hjod.

Food fights at the WTO: political economy of India's focus on food security in international trade negotiations
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Surupa Gupta
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

India is both a major agricultural producer and exporter. Therefore, its steadfast focus on food security and defensive position at the agricultural negotiations surprises observers. In my work I analyze the socio-economic constraints and the political processes that have shaped this focus on food security since the beginning of the Doha Round of negotiations in 2001. Even though Indian agriculture has gone through notable changes since then, India faces substantial challenges in its attempt at structural transformation from an agrarian to a non-agrarian state. These domestic challenges shape India's position on agriculture at the multilateral trade negotiations.

This event is open for public and some Indian refreshments will be served.

ASO 6th Annual African King & Queen Pageant
Queens only edition
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
ASO
Location:
O'Hara Ballroom
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of African Student Organization (ASO)

The African students organization (ASO) is a student led organization on campus that is dedicated to spreading awareness about the different cultures within Africa and teaching the student body about the political and social issues that effect the continent and its diaspora. The organization does this by engaging students in biweekly general body meetings, monthly large scale events and other student gatherings. ASO also aims to engage students in community service around Pittsburgh through volunteering activities and is dedicated to giving back to the continent through Charity. Currently, ASO is partnered up with Duduzile Academy in Kenya in an effort to highlight the importance of education. Lastly, ASO wishes to create a strong community where students of African descent and any other students who are interested in learning more about African culture may come together.
We meet every other Tuesday starting January 16th in the William Pitt Union room 548 at 8:30 pm. All students interested are welcome to join ASO.

Saturday, January 27

Mithai Indian Sweets Tasting
Time:
2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Location:
Cloister, Frick Fine Arts Building
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center

We will offer many different types of Indian sweets to taste and learn about sweets making and the significance of sweets in South Asia.

Thursday, February 1

Studying Working-Class Culture & the History of Social Movements—Challenges & Possibilities
Time:
12:30 pm to 2:00 pm
Presenter:
Sabine Hake (University of Texas at Austin, German Literature & Culture)
Location:
Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu
“Conversion Stories: Turning Communists into Nazis”
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Sabine Hake, University of Texas at Austin, German Literature and Culture
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies and European Studies Center on behalf of

Historians have long argued about the relationship between the workers and the Nazis. Did the Nazis betray the German working class or did they offer solutions to their problems? Answering these questions as part of a larger debate about politics and emotions means to pay close attention to the grievances and resentments that made possible the shift from class to race as the main category of identification. This lecture uses a little-known genre from the early 1930s known as Bewegungsromane (novels about the Nazi movement) to reconstruct the social(ist) imaginaries mobilized in the name of National Socialism. Today these Nazi conversion stories not only shed light on the politics of emotion that turned Communists into Nazis; they also model the symbolic convergence of nationalism, socialism, and populism in modern mass movements.

Friday, February 2

Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Global Studies Center Faculty and Staff
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Keynote Address: A Woman for the 21st Century
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodessa Jones
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.

Jones will discuss the Medea Project and the process of creating productive dialogue to examine such conditions as racism, sexism, homophobia, addictions, and fear that greatly affect our daily lives. In addition, she will play video excerpts from her work and perform excerpts from her various writings and scripts.

Monday, February 5

Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Tuesday, February 6

Planning Postindustrialism in Pittsburgh and Beyond
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Tracy Neumann
Location:
3911 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Tracy Neumann specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century North American history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. She teaches courses on twentieth-century U.S. history, urban history, research methods, and public history. Before pursuing a PhD, she worked for several years as a consultant for a cultural resource management firm, and her professional experience as a public history practitioner led her to help develop Wayne State's MA Program in Public History, for which she serves as the coordinator. She also co-edits the Global Urban History blog and sits on the editorial boards of Urban History and Temple University Press's Pennsylvania History book series.

More information about the event TBA.

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Felix Germain
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Phone:
4126243487
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session, we will be reading Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones and hear from Pitt Prof. Felix Germain (Africana Studies).

Rojo Amanecer (Mexico)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Rojo Amanecer (Jorge Fons, Mexico, 1990)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

Rojo Amenecer is a film about the Tlatelolco Massacre in the section of Tlatelolco in Mexico City in the evening of October 2, 1968. It focuses on the day of a middle-class Mexican family living in one of the apartment buildings surrounding the Plaza de Tlatelolco (also known as the Plaza de las Tres Culturas)[1] and is based on testimonials from witnesses and victims.

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Thursday, February 8

1968: The Ambiguous Consequences of a Failed Revolution
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Todd Gitlin, Columbia University
Location:
WPU Assembly Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

The multiple uprisings of 1968 challenged authorities worldwide, and led to many reforms, but the insurgents misunderstood the nature of their insurgencies, and this misunderstanding drastically limited their effects. They did not add up to a revolution. Rather, in their multiplicity, they were something far more complicated and ambiguous: the culmination of an era of incremental progressive change, a signal of the collapse of conventional liberalism, and a prologue to deep cultural changes as well as grim backlash

Friday, February 9

A Conversation with Samir Lakhani
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Samir Lakhani
Location:
Alumni Hall, 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, David Berg Center for Ethics and Leadership, innovation Institute and and The Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences

Samir was a college student volunteering in a rural Cambodian village when he witnessed firsthand the spread of disease due to poor personal hygiene. Today, Samir’s non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, recycles bars of soap from hotels in Cambodia and distributes them to those in need.

Healthy Global Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship
Time:
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Presenter:
Samir Lakhani
Location:
William Pitt Union 630
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Director's Office, Global Studies Center and Study Abroad Office along with Center for Cross Cultural Leadership and Development

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Interested in a career with a non-profit—or in developing a new NGO that will change lives? You’re sure to gain insight and inspiration from Samir.

Fireside Chat
Health and Global Entrepreneurship
Time:
5:30 pm to 7:30 pm
Presenter:
Audrey Murrell
Location:
University Club, Gold Room
Sponsored by:
Director's Office along with College of Business Administration, innovation Institute and World Affairs Council

Samir Lakhani witnessed the spread of disease firsthand while volunteering in Cambodia. His non-profit, Eco-Soap Bank, has supplied more than 650,000 individuals with soap and hygiene education since 2014.

Samir joins Audrey Murrell, associate dean of Pitt’s College of Business Administration, for a conversation about ethics, leadership and global entrepreneurship in the 21st century.

Monday, February 12

Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
James Pickett
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall- History Department Lounge
Announced by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies on behalf of

Junior Faculty Manuscript Workshop on James Pickett's manuscript: Polymaths of Islam: Scholars and Knowledge Networks in a Eurasian Cosmopolis. Comments by Professor Devin DeWeese from the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Tuesday, February 13

Creative Pedagogies for Global Studies
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodessa Jones
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pitt Arts

Artist-in-residence Rhodessa Jones will offer a brief presentation and lead a discussion on using performance-based pedagogies to teach Global Studies. Jones is an actress, teacher, director, and writer, perhaps best known for the Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women and HIV Circle, which is a performance workshop designed to achieve personal and social transformation with incarcerated women and women living with HIV.

Archive & Event: Mexico, 1968
The Year That Changed the World: Global Legacies of 1968
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Samuel Steinberg
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with University Center for Int'l Studies (UCIS)
Contact Email:
clas@pitt.edu

Samuel Steinberg is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature at University of Southern California. Steinberg’s research and teaching engage modern and contemporary Latin American literature and visual culture, as well as critical theory and political thought.

He is the author of Photopoetics at Tlatelolco: Afterimages of Mexico, 1968 (University of Texas Press, 2016). Currently he is finishing a book on literature and debt, “Ghostscripts: Inheritance of Juan Rulfo,” and beginning another, “The Speculative Image,” on political conceptuality and visual form.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the ‘year that changed the world.’ UCIS is commemorating this with our Global Legacies of 1968 series.

www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events

Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Time:
4:30 pm
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Thursday, February 15

Global 1968 Film and Discussion: The Nigerian Civil War and Its Impact on Nation-Building in Africa
The Nigerian Civil War and Its Impact on Nation-Building in Africa
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

The UCIS Gloabl 68 Series draws themes from events that took place around the world in 1968. As part of this series, the African Studies Program will be showing a documentary entitled "Biafra and Nigeria War 1967-1970". This will be followed by a panel discussion on the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War (July 6, 1967 - January 3, 1970). Our panel will discuss the causes, aftermath and legacy of the conflict and the lessons for independence, democracy and freedom. Our invited panel consists of Edmond Keller from UCLA, Joshua Forest from La Roche University and Moses Ochonu from Vanderbilt.

Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Susan Bibler Coutin
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Susan Bibler Coutin, Professor of Anthropology, University of California - Irvine
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Susan Bibler Coutin holds a Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology and is professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society and the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, where she served as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the Graduate Division from 2010-2017. Her research has examined social, political, and legal activism surrounding immigration issues, particularly immigration from El Salvador to the United States.Her newest book, Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence (Duke University Press, 2016) examines the experiences of 1.5 generation migrants, that is, individuals who were born in El Salvador but raised in the United States. Based on interviews with 1.5 generation Salvadorans in Southern California and in El Salvador, this book explores the power and limitations of nation-based categories of membership.

327 Cuadernos (Argentina)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

327 Cuadernos (Andres Di Tella, Argentina, 2015)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

Ricardo Piglia, one of the great narrators of Hispanic language, returns to Argentina after many years of living abroad. It is proposed to review exhaustively, for the first time, the 327 notebooks that constitute his private diary.

327 Cuadernos Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR2EAbhaCs

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Salam Neighbor
Hello Neighbor Documentary Film Series
Time:
8:00 pm
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor

In an effort to better understand refugee life, [the filmmakers] spent one month living alongside displaced families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers ever allowed by the United Nations to be given a tent and registered inside a refugee camp, [they] were able to get a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis. [Their] experience uncovered overwhelming trauma but also the untapped potential our uprooted neighbors posses. With the right programs we can support healing, ease the burden on host countries and even empower the disenfranchised by unleashing people’s creativity.

Friday, February 16

Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Global Studies Center Faculty and Staff
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Global Studies will host a 4-part series with sessions on January 19th, February 2nd, February 16th, and March 16th to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Tuesday, February 20

El Amparo (Venezuela)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

El Amparo (Rober Calzadilla, Venezuela, 2016)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

At the end of the 80's, by the creeks of the Arauca river, near the Colombian-Venezuelan border, two men survived the brutality of a shooting in which 14 of their mates were killed. They claimed to be mere fishermen, but the Venezuelan army accused them to be guerrilla fighters, intimidating them in every possible way and even attempting to remove them from the cell where they were guarded by a policeman. Their neighbors prevented their transfer, but the pressure they faced to give in and submit the official version was overwhelming.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8D0JMRxF54

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, February 21

Conversations on Europe - European Cities in the 21st Century
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday, February 22

Rebellious Youth and the Global 1960s: Politics, Punk Rock, and Propaganda in Cold War Japan
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Christopher Gerteis
Location:
4130 Wesley W Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center
Rivers and History, Rivers of History- Symposium Keynote Lecture
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Terje Tvedt
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

The talk will discuss some examples of the very important but changing roles of rivers in history (the small Akerselva in Oslo, Norway, the Derwent in England, the Indus, and the Huang He in China). Based on these cases it will discuss modernization theories that dominated international discourse on development after World War II, theories that disregarded the role of water in historical developments.

Black History Month Performance
Performance Music: Theater for the 21st Century
Time:
7:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodess Jones, Idris Acakamoor and the Pyramids
Location:
Charity Randall Theater
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.

Jones will be joined by musicians Idris Ackamoor on tenor and alto sax and the bass and percussion groove of the Pyramids. The group will include excerpts of several of their significant performances, including the spoken word musical tone poem, "THE GRANDMA COLE STORY," a stinging indictment of the slave trade as told through the eyes of a ten year old African girl held captured aboard a slave ship. "CHINA LANE" tells the story through spoken word and music of a forbidden love affair between a Chinese laundry proprietor and a freed slave. "MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH" deals with the current immigration crisis in Europe and features a family of Albanian refugees escaping into Germany aboard a train in search for a better life. Additional excerpts will be performed.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Friday, February 23 to Saturday, February 24

Modern Rivers of Eurasia: Potential, Control, Change
Time:
8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

The inland rivers of Central Eurasia intersect vast regions, sustain diverse communities, and inform social identities. This symposium will explore how efforts to control and exploit the various potentials of these waterways reflect economic, political, and cultural histories that continue to shape local relationships of aquatic and anthropoid life. The speakers are part of a growing international and interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus on water and society in Central Eurasia and engage conversations of urgent concern and global relevance. Central Eurasia has become known for the ways in which multiple countries have for decades contested the natural resources of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya although these rivers feed hydroelectric power production and agriculture at the expense of ecology—tragically shrinking the Aral Sea. Symposium participants will consider cross-cutting issues that center on cases of navigation, flood control, channel management, irrigation, and dam construction. This emphasis will promote a broad discussion with our audience about water-society relationships within globalizing contexts of the modern world.

Friday, February 23

What’s in a River? Teaching River Studies in Eurasian and Global Contexts
Time:
9:30 am
Presenter:
Ruth Mostern (University of Pittsburgh) and Abigail Owen (Carnegie Mellon University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu
Living on the Margins—Burlaki Culture and Identity on the Volga River
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu
CERIS Book Discussion Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa by Ousmane Kane
Time:
5:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)

Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at the University of Pittsburgh on February 23, 2018. Dinner at 5:00 PM, Book Discussion at 6:00 PM.

Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World at the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate the book discussion.
The author, Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard University.

“Beyond Timbuktu is part of the resurgent interest in African intellectual history. This book is an important contribution to the field, as it ties trends in Muslim West African thought to the development and role of Islamic education in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Muslim West African societies.” -Jennifer Lofkrantz, St. Mary’s College

To Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHS3vhlfZxbYujrkDq4ECEtGICJQ6C...

CERIS Book Discussion, 2/23
Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History
Contact Email:
amir.syed@pitt.edu

Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane. Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at UPitt. Discussion at 6:00 PM. Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt will facilitate the book discussion. Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard.

Saturday, February 24

Creative Survival, Creative Performance: Perusing the New Narrative
Student Performance
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Rhodessa Jones and Pitt students
Location:
Alumni Hall 7th Floor Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Sponsored by PITT ARTS and co-sponsored by: The Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, The Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Africana Studies, Global Studies and and The Department of Music.

This is the culmination of a month of workshops with Pitt students exploring the creative process and utilizing autobiographical history as a vehicle for performance. Using movement, text, text-writing, vocalizations, theatre games, memory exercises, autobiographical musings, and storytelling, Rhodessa Jones will demonstrate her use of "art as social activism" to create social change.

Rivers Symposium Discussants’ Roundtable
Time:
3:45 pm
Presenter:
Nicholas Breyfogle (Ohio State University), Terje Tvedt (University of Bergen), and Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Eastern Washington University)
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Confucius Institute, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Humanities Center, Department of History, World History Center, Department of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, GSPIA and Carnegie Mellon University Department of History
Contact:
Patryk Reid
Contact Email:
par85@pitt.edu

Monday, February 26

   Narrating the 'Righteous in the Colombian Armed Conflict': A Civil Pedagogy of Solidarity for Highly Polarized and Deeply Divided Societies
Time:
5:30 pm
Presenter:
 Dr. Carlo Tognato, Universidad Nacional, Colombia (Director, Center for Social Studies, National University of Colombia)
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies along with Department of Sociology
Contact:
clas
Contact Phone:
8-791
Contact Email:
clas@pitt.edu

Carlo Tognato. Profesor Asociado del Departamento de Sociología de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Bogotá. Se desempeña  actualmente como director del Centro de Estudios Sociales. Es también Faculty Fellow del Center for Cultural Sociology en Yale University y Fellow del Indo-Pacific Governance Research Centre de la University of Adelaide. Tiene un Ph.D. en Ciencia Política (UCLA) y en Economía Política (Universitá di Ancona, Italia), un MPhil en Relaciones Internacionales (University of Oxford) y un pregrado en Economía Política (Universitá Bocconi, Milán).

Sus intereses se enfocan principalmente en la sociología cultural, la sociología económica, y en particular sobre las relaciones entre sociedad civil y mercado, así como en la sociología cultural de la violencia.  Sus publicaciones más recientes incluyen un libro publicado en 2012 en Nueva York con Palgrave-Macmillan sobre la influencia de la cultura sobre el funcionamiento de las instituciones monetarias (Central Bank Independence: Cultural Codes and Symbolic Performance) y otro libro editado por él que saldrá en 2015 con Harvard University y con la Universidad Nacional de Colombia sobre el papel de las prácticas creativas en las políticas públicas (Rethinking Cultural Agency: The Significance of Antanas Mockus).

Wednesday, February 28

The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Screening
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (171 min) is a 1988 American film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera, published in 1984. Director Philip Kaufman and screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière portray the effect on Czechoslovak artistic and intellectual life during the 1968 Prague Spring of socialist liberalization preceding the invasion by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact that ushered in a period of communist repression. It portrays the moral, political, and psycho-sexual consequences for three bohemian friends: a surgeon, and two female artists with whom he has a relationship.

Professor Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program at Pitt, will introduce the film.

Thursday, March 1

Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

Dusan Makavejev’s Love Affair provides us with an example of cinematic reflexivity, which can be defined as any technique that reminds the viewer that he or she is watching a film. Reflexivity foregrounds the fact that film meaning is a function of a set of codes with ideological implications rather than a transparent reflection of reality. Reflexivity can be achieved through intertextuality, exaggeration of cinematic conventions or conspicuous narration that reminds us of the author’s mark on the text. These techniques are all in evidence in Love Affair, whose textual heterogeneity calls into question the earnestness of cinematic (including socialist) realism as well as the official ideologies of state communism. As Thomas Elsaesser notes, Love Affair juxtaposes three sites of meaning: “the liberating intimacy of a sexual relationship…, the public world of abstract didacticism and cold rationality…, [and] the memory of the Russian Revolution and Tito’s national liberation war”. (Elsaesser, European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood, p. 322) Our understanding of Makavejev’s view of 1960s Yugoslavian society depends on our interpretation of the ironic and tragic relationship between these three sites of meaning. (Alex Lykidis, "Love Affair," Critical Commons)

The film will be introduced Dr. Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

1968: Perspectives from Eastern Europe
Time:
4:45 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film Studies Program
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Email:
kmw152@pitt.edu

This round-table is a follow-up event to the screening of the Unbearable Lightness of Being (February 28, 2 p.m.) and of Early Works (March 1, 3 p.m.) and is part of the UCIS-wide anniversary series on 1968. The panel will explore (partly based on the films and the book) the question whether 1968 has a universal meaning across geographic space and time. The round-table's contribution to the UCIS-wide event will be to tease out some of the ways in which for 1968 a “kinship system” may exist (to use Wittgenstein’s analogy), but the implications are profoundly different (in the first and second worlds, or in a distribution system that is—essentially—domestic Serbian/film festival vs. US/box-office).

Moderator: Vladimir Padunov, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Discussants: Martin Votruba, Head of the Slovak Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Ljiljana Duraskovic, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Randall Halle, Director, Film Studies Program

Saturday, March 3

French Immersion Institute Workshop
Time:
8:30 am to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
$20 registratoin
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Samedi 3 mars 2018:
La situation linguistique et culturelle en Bretagne, Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon

Samedi 21 avril 2018:
Françoise Giroud & Simone Veil: deux écrivaines politiques pour la couse des femmes
Conférencière: Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh

Program runs from 9:00-13:30, with an 8:30 breakfast and 12:30 lunch included.

Registration deadlines: February 26th for March 3rd workshop; April 16th for April 21st workshop.
Enclose a $20.00 check for each program ($40.00 for both). Fee includes ACT 48 credit-4 -hours for each program, breakfast and lunch.) Send check payable to the University of Pittsburgh. To facilitate our records, please write on check memo: (French Immersion)

Bonnie Adair-Hauck: adairhauck@gmail.com

Tuesday, March 6

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Authors Under Authoritarianism
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Jacques Bromberg
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

This reading group for educators explores literary texts from a global perspective. Content specialists offer stimulating presentations of the work and its context, and together we brainstorm innovative pedagogical practices for incorporating the text and its themes into the curriculum. After a successful partnership with City of Asylum and their authors-in-residence in the fall, our series continues this spring with the theme of literature and authoritarianism. At this session, Prof. Jacques Bromberg (Classics) will lead a discussion of Sophocles' Antigone.

Monday, March 12

Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Film Screening: “Confrontation: Paris 1968”
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Presenter:
Seymour Drescher, Pitt Emeritus Professor of History
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Join us for a screening of “Confrontation: Paris 1968” and a conversation with one of the filmmakers, Pitt’s own Emeritus Professor of History, Seymour Drescher.

Tuesday, March 13

Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Time:
4:30 pm
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

Wednesday, March 14

Conversations on Europe - May 1968 and the Legacies of Protest in France
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Part of the ESC Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series and its series of Virtual Roundtables, Conversations on Europe.

Thursday, March 15

Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Michael White
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center
Whose Golden Door? The Global Challenge of Migration
Time:
4:30 pm
Presenter:
Michael White, Professor of Population Studies, Brown University
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Michael White is the Robert E. Turner Distinguished Professor of Population Studies at Brown University, where he is also Professor of Sociology and Director of the initiative in Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences. White's research covers a wide array of topics within the broad area of migration and population distribution: from urban residential segregation, to rural-urban migration in developing societies, to contemporary international migration and immigrant assimilation. White's publications reflect his combination of sociology, demography, and public policy interests.

The Global Studies Center's support of the Faculty Development Seminar, "Humanizing the Global, Globalizing the Human," now in its third year, in partnership with Pitt's Year of the Humanities initiative, will continue, with three more events scheduled through the spring. The popular and provocative lecture series which began in the fall examines the global and humanistic themes of Migration.

8 Borders, 8 Days
Hello Neighbor Documentary Film Series
Time:
8:00 pm
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of The Ridgeway Center and Hello Neighbor

A single mother shows us the consequences of closing America’s doors to families fleeing war. With no answer to her application for resettlement in the US, and every other path to safety closed off, a smuggler’s raft to Europe was the only way out. 8 Borders, 8 Days is her story; the intimate details of why a fiercely-determined mother is willing to risk her children’s lives for a better future and an immersive experience of their eight-day journey to safety.

Friday, March 16

Undergraduate Research Toolkit Series
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Global Studies Center Faculty and Staff
Location:
5400 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

This is the last installment of a 4-part Global Studies Center series to equip students to pursue research within the framework of the multidisciplinary field of global studies. The series is designed for students at any stage of their academic career. It's a must for students considering pursing a BPHIL, an honor's thesis, or enrolling in a graduate program in the future. Dr. Michael Goodhart, GSC Director and Professor of Political Science, along with GSC faculty will provide insight based on their experience on conceiving research ideas, formulating research questions, identifying methods to consider to collect and analyze data, ethically gathering data working within university research guidelines and lastly presenting and disseminating data using traditional methods and new forms of digital media. Each session will include ample time for discussion so bring your ideas and questions!

Tuesday, March 20

La Tempestad (Mexico)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

La Tempestad (Tatiana Huezo, Mexico, 2016)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

The emotional journeys of two women victimized by corruption and injustice in Mexico and of the love, dignity and resistance that allowed them to survive.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPxXzolGr6Q

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Thursday, March 22

1968: Framing Radical Politics in Time and Space
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Elaine Carey, Purdue University, and Felix Germain, University of Pittsburgh
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and Open to the Public

Part of the UCIS series exploring the effects of the hallmark year 1968. More Information TBA.

Two Evenings at Pitt
Exploring the work of Mohsin Hamid
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Elizabeth Fielder, English doctoral students
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

Tuesday, March 27

Conversations on Europe - Elections in Italy: A Next Wave for Populism?
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Various
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

In-person or remote participation in this virtual roundtable is possible, and audience questions are encouraged.

For information, contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

Connected Seas: the Baltic Sea in a wider Oceanic World
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Michael North, Professor of History, University of Greifswald, Germany
Location:
232 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center along with Department of History

Thursday, March 29

Climate Change and Protest (tentative)
Time:
2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Presenter:
Stacy VanDeveer, University of Massachusetts Boston
Location:
4217 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact Email:
europeanstudies@pitt.edu

Funded through the ESC's Jean Monnet Center of Excellence Grant, this lecture is part of the Center's Participation and Democracy 2017-18 Series.

Monday, April 2

Hot Topics, Global Perspectives
Time:
1:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Grab a coffee and join the Global Studies Center for the first of our monthly series where we host an informal discussion about a pressing issue of the day. Get global insight and bring your thoughts to share or questions to have addressed. Cookies served!

Tuesday, April 3

Red Gringo (Chile)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

Red Gringo (Miguel Angel Vidaurre & Will Roberts, Chile, 2016)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

The North American singer Dean Reed travels to Chile in 1962, with the hope of making the most of the fame gained with a couple of radio hits. Deeply shocked by the political and social issues of the country, he decides to travel through Latin America giving concerts, shooting films and making photo stories. In the meantime he suffers an ideological transformation that will lead him to excentric ways of political commitment. 'Gringo Rojo' is a pop memory exercise that gathers all the pieces of his life in Chile and the rest of the world.

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Wednesday, April 4

Global Issues Through Literature: Authors Under Authoritarianism
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Jeanette Jouili
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

What is life like under authoritarian regimes, especially for writers, artists, and other creative thinkers whose aim is to loosen, bend, and even break the rules? Do harsh regulations constrict or condone innovative artistic practices? How can authors subvert authoritarianism through writing? What happens if they get caught? This year’s Global Issues Through Literature series, a reading group designed for K-12 educators to learn and use new texts in the classroom, will travel the world through the eyes of authors writing under authoritarianism to try to understand the role of literature as document, commentator, and critic of restrictive regimes.

For this session we will read Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie and hear from Pitt Prof. Jeanette Jouili (Religious Studies).

Thursday, April 5

Two Evenings at Pitt
Exploring the work of Viet Thanh Nguyen
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Gayle Rogers and English students
Location:
171B Hillman
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures

As part of the Pittsburgh A&L "Ten Evenings" series, Mohsin Hamid (author of Exit West) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (author of the Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Sympathizer and, more recently, The Refugees) will be talking about their recent works and creative processes. Prior to their public lectures at the Carnegie Music Hall, the GSC is sponsoring more intimate gatherings with Pitt faculty and students to learn about and discuss how these works of fiction help us to understand global processes and the connections, disruptions, inequalities, and opportunities they create. We will be giving out a limited number of FREE tickets to the lecture to those who attend. Please save the dates and join us on campus Thursday evening before the lecture, and Monday at the music hall!

Friday, April 6 to Saturday, April 7

Pitt/Penn State Global Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium
Time:
(All day)
Location:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Elaine Linn
Contact Email:
eel58@pitt.edu

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.

A wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community are encouraged. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.
Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Center for Global Studies' website.
Students should contact Elaine Linn at eel58@pitt.edu for more information or visit the GSC website.

Tuesday, April 10

Digital Portfolio Drop-In Sessions
Time:
4:30 pm
Location:
3127 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Dr. Jared McCormick, Visiting Professorship in Contemporary International Issues, will welcome students to drop by his office to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively create a digital portfolio required for all GSC undergraduate students, that adequately reflects their academic and co-curruicular experiences. Learn more about Dr. McCormick's experience with digital interface and methodologies: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/content/visiting-professor-contemporary-...

El Grito (Mexico)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

CLAS-Latin American Cinema Series 2018/ CLAS- Serie de Cine Latinoamericano 2018

El Grito (Leobardo López Aretche Mexico, 1968)
*Subtitles

Come and join us for a great film and pizza!
Free and open to the public!

A documentary on the student movement in Mexico, 1968, made by film students.

For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Friday, April 13

European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2018
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Various
Location:
527, 538, and 548 WPU
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Gina Peirce
Contact Phone:
4126482290
Contact Email:
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The European and Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. Selected participants will give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Saturday, April 14

2018 Islamic Studies Research Symposium
Historical & Modern Experiences of Muslims in the World
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Duquesne University
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and Consortium for Christian-Muslim Dialogue (CCMD) at Duquesne University
Contact:
Elaine Linn
Contact Email:
eel58@pitt.edu

CERIS is hosting a symposium to highlight faculty and student research and to celebrate 15 years since inception. The day will include both faculty and student panels along with a keynote speaker. Presentations will be organized along the following themes:
Social Change
Cultural & Artist Representation
Policies and International Politics
Theology, Doctrine, and Practice
Emerging Economies and Technologies

Tuesday, April 17

1968: What Have We Learned
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Louis Picard, James Cook, Jae-Jae Spoon, Michael Goodhart, Scott Morgenstern, Nancy Condee
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Jae-Jae Spoon
Contact Email:
spoonj@pitt.edu
Canal Stories (Panama)
CLAS- Latin American Cinema
Time:
6:30 pm
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Latin American Studies
Contact:
Diana Shemenski
Contact Email:
dms180@pitt.edu

Part of the CLAS-Latin American Cinema Film Series. For other movie screening information, visit https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/clas/events/list.

Friday, April 20 to Saturday, April 21

Moot ICC
Time:
9:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
Pitt Law School
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Center for International Legal Education

This competition introduces high school students to international law. Students read a case written by law students, write memorials, and argue before judges.

Saturday, April 21

French Immersion Institute Workshop
Time:
8:30 am to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh
Location:
Posvar 4130, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and European Union Center of Excellence
Cost:
$20 registratoin
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

Samedi 3 mars 2018:
La situation linguistique et culturelle en Bretagne, Dr. Sébastien Dubriel, Université de Carnegie-Mellon

Samedi 21 avril 2018:
Françoise Giroud & Simone Veil: deux écrivaines politiques pour la couse des femmes
Conférencière: Bénédicte Barlat, Directrice - Centre Francophone de Pittsburgh

Program runs from 9:00-13:30, with an 8:30 breakfast and 12:30 lunch included.

Registration deadlines: February 26th for March 3rd workshop; April 16th for April 21st workshop.
Enclose a $20.00 check for each program ($40.00 for both). Fee includes ACT 48 credit-4 -hours for each program, breakfast and lunch.) Send check payable to the University of Pittsburgh. To facilitate our records, please write on check memo: (French Immersion)

Bonnie Adair-Hauck: adairhauck@gmail.com

Tuesday, May 1

CCA International Marketing Competition
Time:
12:00 pm
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
4126485085
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

The Global Studies Center and the International Business Center work with high school language and social sciences teachers to introduce international business concepts to students through an international marketing competition. It culminates in an interscholastic competition hosted by the Global Studies Center and the IBC at Pitt, where students present their marketing plans in front of fellow competitors and a panel of judges from the academic and business communities, as well as answer audience questions. The teams that win first, second and third place in the final each receive awards recognizing their hard work.

Monday, June 25 to Friday, July 20

Pennsylvania Governor's School for Global and International Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
varies
Location:
varies
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29

2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers
Time:
8:30 am to 12:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center and International Business Center
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Phone:
4176487423
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Make college more affordable for your high school students—and help them grow as global citizens and 21st century professional—while earning ACT 48 professional development credits.

The College in High School program and the University Center for International Studies will host a summer institute for secondary educators interested in teaching globally focused courses that offer transferable college credit to students at their high school. Courses in which you can obtain certification and training may include:

Intermediate French I-II
Intermediate German I-II
Intermediate Spanish I-II
Latin Intermediate Prose and Verse
Western Civilization II
World Politics
Imperial Russia

Courses will be aligned with Pennsylvania Core and Academic Standards (for social studies) or ACTFL performance standards (for world languages).

The 2018 Summer Institute for Pennsylvania Teachers is funded through generous support from the Longview Foundation for Education in World Affairs and International Understanding (https://longviewfdn.org/).

For more information and to apply, visit chs.pitt.edu/sipt.