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Global Health
Global Health explores the risks and opportunities of globalization for the health of the world population, including the increased spread of diseases across borders and oceans, and the enhanced ability to alert populations and health organizations about epidemics. It also addresses international emergency response systems for health epidemics in different parts of the world.
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Global Economy
Global Economy explores the changing reach and nature of economic flows and political organization under conditions of globalization, raising issues such as international economic growth and crisis, global competition.
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Global Security
Global Security explores international, ethnic, and religious conflicts, and considers ways of preventing and resolving conflicts, including negotiation and fostering of deeper cross-cultural understanding. It raises issues such as the role of the United Nations, armed intervention, non-governmental organizations, humanitarian relief, terrorism, international law, and diplomacy.
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Global Society
Global Society explores how our understanding of who we are changes under globalization, exploring issues such as race, religion, nationality, history, and gender. It addresses the interchange of ideas between cultures, movements of people, international rights, and other factors impacting cultural development in different parts of the world.

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, September 10

Lecture -- Cricis and Criticism: The Predicament of Global Modernity
Arif Dirlik
5:00 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center
boundary 2, Cultural Studies Program, Humanities Center

Arif Dirlik is now an Independent Scholar living in Oregon. Arif Dirlik was Professor of History at Duke University from 1971 – 2001. He was then Knight Professor of History and Anthropology and Director of Center for Critical Theory and Transnational Studies at the University of Oregon. Dirlik is one of the leading experts on the political culture and party politics of the People’s Republic of China. He is the author of more than a dozen books on Chinese Communism, Revolution, Chinese Historiography, and historiography from such presses as Oxford, California, and Duke. He has taught and lectured in the world’s major universities and has been Visiting Professor at UCLA, Beijing, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, as well as Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies. In recent years, Dirlik has expanded his range of research to problems of globalization, world history, and other dominant modes of current academic practice, linking them to developments in the real world of political economy.

Thursday, September 11

Panel Discussion -- The People's Republic of China in the Perspective of Global Modernity
Arif Dirlik
12:30 pm
The Humanities Center, 602 Cathedral of Learning
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center
boundary 2, Cultural Studies Program, Humanities Center

With responses by Paul Bove (English), Nancy Condee (Global Studies), and Michael Goodhart (Political Science)

Readings for Thursday's colloquium can be found here.

Arif Dirlik is now an Independent Scholar living in Oregon. Arif Dirlik was Professor of History at Duke University from 1971 – 2001. He was then Knight Professor of History and Anthropology and Director of Center for Critical Theory and Transnational Studies at the University of Oregon. Dirlik is one of the leading experts on the political culture and party politics of the People’s Republic of China. He is the author of more than a dozen books on Chinese Communism, Revolution, Chinese Historiography, and historiography from such presses as Oxford, California, and Duke. He has taught and lectured in the world’s major universities and has been Visiting Professor at UCLA, Beijing, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, as well as Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies. In recent years, Dirlik has expanded his range of research to problems of globalization, world history, and other dominant modes of current academic practice, linking them to developments in the real world of political economy.

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