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Global Health
Global Health explores the risks and opportunities of globalization for the health of the world population, including the increased spread of diseases across borders and oceans, and the enhanced ability to alert populations and health organizations about epidemics. It also addresses international emergency response systems for health epidemics in different parts of the world.
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Global Economy
Global Economy explores the changing reach and nature of economic flows and political organization under conditions of globalization, raising issues such as international economic growth and crisis, global competition.
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Global Security
Global Security explores international, ethnic, and religious conflicts, and considers ways of preventing and resolving conflicts, including negotiation and fostering of deeper cross-cultural understanding. It raises issues such as the role of the United Nations, armed intervention, non-governmental organizations, humanitarian relief, terrorism, international law, and diplomacy.
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Global Society
Global Society explores how our understanding of who we are changes under globalization, exploring issues such as race, religion, nationality, history, and gender. It addresses the interchange of ideas between cultures, movements of people, international rights, and other factors impacting cultural development in different parts of the world.

Upcoming Events

Thursday, March 30

The Holocaust, Modern Genocides and the Anti-Atrocities Movement
Time:
10:30 am to 12:00 pm
Presenter:
John Prendergast
Location:
3610 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Ford Institute for Human Security
Contact Phone:
412-648-7434

Genocide has evolved over time since the Holocaust. But the variables going into genocide have remained the same: targeting people on the basis of their identity. The biggest symbol of hope on the horizon regarding efforts to counter genocide is the growing people's movement to stop it from happening. John Prendergast will discuss about how social movements are the force that has changed the course of history in the past in response to terrible atrocities, and will do so again with regard to genocide.
John Prendergast is a human rights activist and New York Times best-selling author who has focused on peace in Africa for over thirty years. He is the Founding Director of the Enough Project, an initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. He is also the Co-Founder of The Sentry, a new investigative initiative focused on dismantling the networks financing conflict and atrocities. John has worked for the Clinton White House, the State Department, two members of Congress, the National Intelligence Council, UNICEF, Human Rights Watch, the International Crisis Group, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. He was featured on a segment of Sixty Minutes, CBS News, on March 19! He has been a Big Brother for over 25 years, as well as a youth counselor and a basketball coach.
Light refreshments will be served.

Friday, March 31

Historicizing Boko Haram's Rage Against Modernity and Munafunci
Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Moses Ochonu
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with Africana Studies Department, Department of History, World History Center and Global Studies Center

In this talk, Dr. Moses Ochonu, Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, will historicize the political, theological, and economic events and anxieties that produced the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria. He will deploy, as a structuring analytical device, the theological and polemical construct of munafunci (or hypocrisy). Munafunci is a recurring trope in the rhetorical claims of Muslim reformers and other critics of political and religious orthodoxies in Northern Nigeria. He will use this grid of munafunci to interrogate the reformist impulses that have animated theological and political contests in Northern Nigerian society, contestations for space and power that prefigured the rise of Boko Haram.

This lecture presentation is part of the Critical Research on Africa Lecture Series organized by ASP Affiliated faculty actively engaged in Africa research.

Wednesday, April 5

Global Issues though Literature
Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings, A Memoir
Time:
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
lisarbromberg@pitt.edu

This reading group gathers globally-minded educators to discuss works of fiction that can be used in the classroom to teach global competency skills. Registration for the last two sessions of the year is open; previous attendance is not necessary. This program is supported by Pitt’s Year of Diversity. Contact Lisa Bromberg with questions.
April 5, 5-8pm, 4130 Posvar: Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings, A Memoir by Margarita Engle, discussion led by Dr. Kenya Dworkin of CMU. Register at the website.

Friday, April 7

Diversity in Global Business
As part of the Year in Diversity
Time:
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Location:
270 Mervis Hall (Colloquium Room)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with International Business Center
Contact:
Jacqueline Saslawski
Contact Email:
jsaslawski@katz.pitt.edu

What is Diversity in Global Business?
The International Business Center and the Global Studies Center are hosting a panel series for the Year of Diversity at Pitt. This series is supported by a grant from Pitt's Provost Office. This is the last of the three panels and will focus on “Diversity and Multiculturalism Beyond the US.”
This panel will feature student and alumni discussants who will share their experiences based on their diverse and "non-diverse" backgrounds, including their national, religious, and gender affiliations. The panelists will explore issues such as whether diverse teams perform better, what expectations and understanding international students hold concerning diversity in the U.S., as well as how studying and working with diverse students and colleagues enriches the "non-diverse" person.
Refreshments will be provided.

Monday, April 10

2017 Symposium Series
Exploring Educational Diversity: Race & Ethnic Issues in China & the United States
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Location:
5604 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with Center for International Studies and Center for Urban Education

Exploring Educators Preparedness to Discus Topics of Race in the Classroom
Presenter: Adam J. Alvarez
A Comparative Study of Ethnic Minority-Serving Higher Education Institutions in China & the United States
Presenter: Weiyan Xiong

Friday, April 14

The Islamic Practices that Shape Uyghur Nationalism
Time:
3:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Rian Thum, Associate Professor of History at Loyola University
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian and East European Studies and Global Studies Center along with Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS)
Contact:
Kiersten Walmsley
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
crees@pitt.edu

Rian Thum’s research and teaching are generally concerned with the overlap of China and the Muslim World. He argues that the Uyghurs - and their place in China today - can only be understood in the light of longstanding traditions of local pilgrimage and manuscript culture.

Friday, April 28

UCIS Graduation Ceremony
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom A, University Club
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Copyright 2017 | Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh