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Global Health
Global Health explores the risks and opportunities of globalization for the health of the world population, including the increased spread of diseases across borders and oceans, and the enhanced ability to alert populations and health organizations about epidemics. It also addresses international emergency response systems for health epidemics in different parts of the world.
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Global Economy
Global Economy explores the changing reach and nature of economic flows and political organization under conditions of globalization, raising issues such as international economic growth and crisis, global competition.
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Global Security
Global Security explores international, ethnic, and religious conflicts, and considers ways of preventing and resolving conflicts, including negotiation and fostering of deeper cross-cultural understanding. It raises issues such as the role of the United Nations, armed intervention, non-governmental organizations, humanitarian relief, terrorism, international law, and diplomacy.
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Global Society
Global Society explores how our understanding of who we are changes under globalization, exploring issues such as race, religion, nationality, history, and gender. It addresses the interchange of ideas between cultures, movements of people, international rights, and other factors impacting cultural development in different parts of the world.

Announcements

A 5-part video dialogue series entitled "Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change" with international and local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice.
Participate in the Undergraduate Research Symposium! Abstracts due February 27, 2015

Upcoming Events

Thursday, February 5

The Price at the Pump: The Current Cost of Oil and the Global Economy
Panel discussion on the current fluidity of the oil market
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Global Studies Center

Why is there a drop in gas prices? What or who is behind it?What is the time frame and what should we expect in the future? How does it impacts policies in the US, Middle East, Russia and Nigeria?

Panel Presenters:
• Laura Paler, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Pittsburgh
• Daniel Berkowitz, Professor, Department of Economics, University of Pittsburgh
• Buba Misawa, Professor, Department of Political Science, Washington and Jefferson College

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Global Climate Politics: Paralysis Above and Movement Below
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Cindy Wiesner, Director of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by the Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change:
A 5-part video dialogue series with international ad local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of popular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Speaker: Cindy Wiesner, Director of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance

Suggested readings:
Davey, Melissa, Vaughn, Adam, and Amanda Holpuch (2014) “People’s Climate March – Thousands Around the World Demand Action – As It Happened” The Guardian. 21 September. Online: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/live/2014/sep/21/peoples-climate-...

The Guardian (2015) “The Guardian View on Paris 2015: the World’s Last Best Chance to Reach an Agreement on Cutting Carbon Emissions” 1 January. Online: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jan/01/guardian-view-paris...

Podesta, P.J. and Laura Smith (2014) “The Changing Face of Climate Change” Slate. 22 September. http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/09/people_...

More information on future sessions is available on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484.

Friday, February 6

Hot Topics Over Coffee!
Changing Identities in a Globalized World
Time:
3:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

The program will focus on our changing identities in a globalized world. We will hear from student groups and faculty who work on issues of global identities, like gender empowerment and refugees. The Global Studies Center will also present new funding opportunities for students. This is a great opportunity to network with other students that know there is a big world out there. Stop by room 4217 Posvar Hall and bring a friend! Good food, good coffee, and good conversation will be provided.

Thursday, February 12

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Putting Climate Justice into Action
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Henia Belalia, National Organizer, Peaceful Uprising
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

A 5-part video dialogue series with international and local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of pupular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Presenter: Henia Belalia, National Organizer, Peaceful Uprising

Suggested readings:
Rapley, Chris (2014) “Climate change is not just about science – it’s about the future we want to create” The Guardian. 22 Nov. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/22/-sp-climate-change-specia...

Satgar, Vishwas (2014) “The Climate is Right for Social Change” Mail & Guardian. 17 December. Online: http://m.mg.co.za/article/2014-12-17-the-climate-is-ripe-for-social-change

McKibben, Bill (2013) “The Fossil Fuel Resistance” Rolling Stone. 25 April. Online: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-fossil-fuel-resistance-201...

More information is available on the Global Studies Center website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484.

Friday, February 13

Discussion with Dennis Jett
author of American Ambassadors: The Past, Present, and Future of America's Diplomats
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dennis Jett
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Ever wonder who becomes an American ambassador and what they do? Professor (and former ambassador) Dennis Jett will explain that and also describe how the country to which a person is sent as ambassador can be influenced by money, religion, politics, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. While some say that communications technology has made the role of an ambassador unnecessary and largely symbolic, Jett will explain why they are more important than ever.

Dennis Jett is a professor of international affairs at Pennsylvania State University. A former career diplomat, he served 28 years in the State Department in Argentina, Israel, Malawi and Liberia, on the National Security Council and was US Ambassador to Peru and Mozambique.

Monday, February 16

Race, Sex, and Human Evolution
The Descent of Women: Gender Issues in Human Evolution
Time:
8:00 pm
Presenter:
Claudine Cohen, Director, Biology and Society Studies École Pratique Des Hautes Etúdes, Paris
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Humanities Center; University of Pittsburgh Honors College; Department of History and Philosophy of Science; Supported by the Department of Anthropology; Gender Sexuality and Women's Studies Program UPMC Health Services Division

A three-part lecture series that exposes biases that underlie the study of our evolutionary past. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Centuries before fossils were accepted as being extinct human relatives, the conception of human history was based on a Great Chain of Being that not only identified numerous human races, but arranged them and males and females within them hierarchically, from the “lowest” to the “highest”. The discovery in 1857 of the first Neanderthal was seen as providing evolutionary evidence of a racial and sexual hierarchy.

Indeed, in The Descent of Man (1871), Charles Darwin wrote at length about the evolution of “civilized” from “primitive, barbaric” humans, a notion that, in various incarnations, still informs interpretations of human evolution. This lecture series will challenge preconceived notions of race and sex from the perspectives of an artist who will discuss how, with an unbiased eye, extinct humans – male and female – would have looked, an historian of science who will deconstruct the traditional concepts of “female” and “male”, and an evolutionary biologist who will bring biology into the discussion of “race”.

Friday, February 20

Global Issues Through Literature: Palestine
Mornings of Jenin
Time:
5:30 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Luke Peterson, University of Pittsburgh
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

K-16 Educators are invited to attend the CERIS spring 2015 book discussion. Dr. Luke Peterson of the University of Pittsburgh will facilitate discussion. Registration is required. Educators can participate in person or online. Dinner, parking, and the book will be provided.
Mornings of Jenin is the story of four generations of Palestinians living through the birth of Israel and the never ending war that follows. Susan Abulhawa gives the terrible conflict a human face. For more information, go to: www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/workshops
The registration form can be found at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ln-kd54H6Egq7OscLhU822fvM-en3HuuZcYCKgV...

Thursday, February 26

"Sustainability" or Survival? Popular Responses to Global Climate Change
Culture Against Climate Change
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr, Hip Hop Caucus
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Department of Sociology; Urban Studies; Supported by Office of the Provost; the Year of Sustainability

A 5-part video dialogue series with international and local leaders of NGOs highlighting effective mobilization efforts to protect themselves from the effects of global warming and to promote climate justice. The series will identify how climate change and environmental problems disproportionately affect already-vulnerable communities, the limitations of government, UN-based, "free-market," or technological attempts to address climate change, and the resulting rise of pupular movements that promote more sustainable futures and all forms of climate and environmental justice.

Presenter: Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr, Hip Hop Caucus

Suggested readings:
Kozlowska, Hanna (2014) “The Climate Movement Is About Much More Than Just Climate” New York Times. 23 September. Online: http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/23/the-climate-movement-is-abou...

“People’s Climate Music” (2014) Hip Hop Caucus. Online: peoplesclimatemusic.com/about/

Podesta, P.J. and Laura Smith (2014) “The Changing Face of Climate Change” Slate. 22 September. http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/09/people_...

“The Fossil Fuel Resistance: The New Green Heroes” (2013) Rolling Stone. 11 April. Online: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/lists/the-fossil-fuel-resistance-me...

More information may be found on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/node/484

Friday, February 27 to Saturday, February 28

Law and the Legal Profession in China
Time:
8:45 am to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Various Scholars
Location:
Alcoa Room, School of Law
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Global Studies Center University of Pittsburgh School of Law Center for International Legal Education, China Council
Contact:
Lynn Kawaratani
Contact Phone:
412-383-3062
Contact Email:
lyk12@pitt.edu

Over the past two decades the profession of law within China has undergone tremendous change. China’s ascension to the World Trade Organization, massive foreign investment, and an increasingly cosmopolitan middle class have forced both the central government in Beijing and the country’s practicing attorneys to grapple with new clientele, new areas of practice, and an increasingly nuanced popular response to legal issues. This conference will bring together an international panel of multidisciplinary experts to examine the development and current practice of the legal profession in China.

Monday, March 2

Race, Sex, and Human Evolution
Race and the Bio-politics of Human Ancestry
Time:
8:00 pm
Presenter:
Jonathan Marks, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center Humanities Center; University of Pittsburgh Honors College; Department of History and Philosophy of Science; Supported by the Department of Anthropology; Gender Sexuality and Women's Studies Program UPMC Health Services Division

A three-part lecture series that exposes biases that underlie the study of our evolutionary past. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Centuries before fossils were accepted as being extinct human relatives, the conception of human history was based on a Great Chain of Being that not only identified numerous human races, but arranged them and males and females within them hierarchically, from the “lowest” to the “highest”. The discovery in 1857 of the first Neanderthal was seen as providing evolutionary evidence of a racial and sexual hierarchy.

Indeed, in The Descent of Man (1871), Charles Darwin wrote at length about the evolution of “civilized” from “primitive, barbaric” humans, a notion that, in various incarnations, still informs interpretations of human evolution. This lecture series will challenge preconceived notions of race and sex from the perspectives of an artist who will discuss how, with an unbiased eye, extinct humans – male and female – would have looked, an historian of science who will deconstruct the traditional concepts of “female” and “male”, and an evolutionary biologist who will bring biology into the discussion of “race”.

Friday, March 20 to Sunday, March 22

Muslims in a Global Context: Europe
PS 1903
Time:
5:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Presenter:
Location:
Room 2200 Sennott Square, University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center Department of Political Science Carnegie Mellon University

The Muslims in the Global Context series offers the opportunity to examine the factors and trends that are having major impacts on these diverse regions and their relationships with other world regions and countries. The mini-courses consist of presentations on topics of critical importance to the understanding of Muslims in diverse regions of the world. In addition to attendance at all lectures, students enrolled for credit are required to develop and write a research paper on one of the themes of the mini-course and answer reflection prompts during the course. One- credit/ 3 units for CMU students is provided for the completion of each mini-course.

This one credit mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around the world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community. The series and course seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim community around the world. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world, the mini course series seeks to have students gain understanding of the religious, cultural, economical and political influences of Muslims in a global context.

5pm Friday March 20, 2015 to 1pm Sunday, March 22, 2015 (Room 2200 Sennott Square, University of Pittsburgh)

All course information, including the speakers, schedule, and readings, may be found on the Global Studies website: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/mini-course/europe

Thursday, April 9 to Friday, April 10

15th Annual Policy Conference: Transatlantic Responses to Militant Islam: Countering Violent Extremism in the United States and the European Union
Time:
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Presenter:
Faculty Organizer: Prof. Michael Kenney (GSPIA)
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence, Global Studies Center Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
Contact Email:
euce@pitt.edu
Copyright 2015 | Global Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh