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Global Health
Global Health explores the risks and opportunities of globalization for the health of the world population, including the increased spread of diseases across borders and oceans, and the enhanced ability to alert populations and health organizations about epidemics. It also addresses international emergency response systems for health epidemics in different parts of the world.
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Global Economy
Global Economy explores the changing reach and nature of economic flows and political organization under conditions of globalization, raising issues such as international economic growth and crisis, global competition.
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Global Security
Global Security explores international, ethnic, and religious conflicts, and considers ways of preventing and resolving conflicts, including negotiation and fostering of deeper cross-cultural understanding. It raises issues such as the role of the United Nations, armed intervention, non-governmental organizations, humanitarian relief, terrorism, international law, and diplomacy.
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Global Society
Global Society explores how our understanding of who we are changes under globalization, exploring issues such as race, religion, nationality, history, and gender. It addresses the interchange of ideas between cultures, movements of people, international rights, and other factors impacting cultural development in different parts of the world.

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, September 28

Global Issues through Literature: Multicultural Societies
Europe: Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Lisa Bromberg
Location:
Posvar 4130
Sponsored by:
European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Phone:
412-624-3487
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

In this first meeting of the 2016-2017 academic year, the Global Issues through Literature teacher reading group will discuss French multiculturalism through a study of the young adult novel Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow by Faiza Guene. Due to a high volume of interest, registration for this event is currently closed.

Friday, September 30

Round Table Conversations with Experts from the Field:
Education, Health, and Medicine
Time:
12:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Presenter:
Medi Bugembe, Alison Karnes, Dr. Mark Karnes, Victoria Nalongo
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Contact:
Katherine Mooney
Contact Phone:
4126481802
Contact Email:
kwm18@pitt.edu

These experts will share their entrepreneurial field experiences working with populations in East Africa to provide education, shelter, healthcare and other basic social services. Students will have the opportunity to meet with them, hear their stories, ask questions, and learn about opportunities to get involved.

Sunday, October 2

Mahatma Gandhi Birthday Celebration
"Be the Change:" Gandhi and the Next Generation
Time:
2:00 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center and Global Studies Center

Please join us for an afternoon of activities celebrating the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi and his teachings. Enjoy tea and conversations with Pittsburgh organizations at 2:00 pm, followed by cultural performances, inter-faith presentations, and a panel discussion authors, scholars, and educators with the topic "Be the Change:" Gandhi and the Next Generation.

Tuesday, October 4

Global Educators' Forum
Time:
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall, 230 S. Bouquet Street
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

The Global Educators' Forum meets twice a year to discuss developing and implementing Global Studies-related programming and curriculum in schools, classrooms, and departments. This open meeting is intended for all educators--including, for example, teachers, administrators, pre-service teachers, post-secondary instructors, and School of Education faculty. Please join us to share your experiences with Global Education programs, learn about available resources, and continue to brainstorm ways of incorporating international and global education components into the curriculum. Dinner, parking, and Act 48 hours are provided, and online access will also be available. Please use the link to register.

Wednesday, October 5

Faculty Salon
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Location:
4100 Posvar (main GSC office)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

Faculty are invited to the next installment of our Global Studies Faculty Salon, an informal, late-afternoon occasion for socializing with colleagues who share research interests. At this first Salon of the 2016-2017 academic year, we welcome in particular faculty who are new to Pitt, new to the GSC, or interested in becoming affiliated. You might see some familiar faces as well as meet new people from many departments and schools around the University. You might even discover potential collaborators on future GAP grants or other joint projects. If you know of colleagues who share an interest in research collaborations and cross-disciplinary work, please invite them to join us as well.
Please let us know by Monday, October 3 if you plan to attend with an email to Global Studies Center. Last minute decisions to participate are also welcome!

Thursday, October 6

Nuruddin Farah: Readings from New Fiction
Time:
5:00 pm
Presenter:
Nuruddin Farah
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of Department of English
Contact:
Abigail Lind
Contact Email:
abl41@pitt.edu

Nuruddin Farah is the winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature as well as the Kurt Tucholsky Prize given by Swedish Pen. Farah's fiction and essays engage with the topics of feminism, colonialism, dictatorship, civil war, and terrorism in his native country, Somalia. Farah was forced into a 22-year exile as a result of his unflinching critiques of female genital mutilation and the dictatorship of Maxamed Siyaad Barre.
This event is hosted by boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture, The Humanities Center, Professor Johnathan Arac, and Professor Paul. A. Bové. Nuruddin Farah is currently a Distinguished Professor of Literature at Bard College.

Friday, October 7

Hot Topics Over Coffee
With a focus on Global Health
Time:
3:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:
4217 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free

Come join us to meet and network with the Global Studies Center students, staff, and faculty. Coffee with be served, of course!

Tuesday, October 11

Peace Corps and Education
Time:
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Location:
3431 Posvar
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Contact:
Nick Langston
Contact Email:
pcorps@pitt.edu

Learn about what Peace Corps Volunteers in the Education Sector are doing globally and what they have to say about their experience.

Thursday, October 13

Ethics for One World
As part of Coevality: Global Ethics in a Time of Total Change Speaker Series
Time:
7:00 pm
Presenter:
Peter Singer
Location:
Carnegie Library Lecture Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with and Humanities Center, and the Year of the Humanities Initiative at the University of Pittsburgh, Department of History of Art and Architecture and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-5085
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

The most important issues we face today are global rather than national: climate change, economic globalization, extreme poverty, immigration and the responsibility to protect people from genocide and crimes against humanity, whatever country they may be in. We need to challenge both the prudence and the ethics of those who put forward narrow nationalistic perspectives. In the long run we cannot be secure and prosperous, or claim to be acting justly, if we fail to play our part in overcoming the world’s problems. Professor Singer will discuss both the perils and the potentials inherent in globalization, and put forward an ethical approach to them.

Friday, October 14

Peter Singer & Terry Smith, Global Studies Faculty Fellow conversation
As part of Coevality: Global Ethics in a Time of Total Change Speaker Series
Time:
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Presenter:
Peter Singer and Terry Smith
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Lecture Theatre
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History of Art and Architecture, and Humanities Center, and the Year of the Humanities Initiative at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Global Studies Center
Contact Phone:
412-648-5085
Contact Email:
global@pitt.edu

PETER SINGER & TERRY SMITH, Global Studies Faculty Fellow conversation: “Global Ethics in a Time of Total Change”

Reception to follow Friday’s conversation in Frick Fine Arts Cloister

Wednesday, October 19

New Perspectives on Kongo in Revolutionary Haiti
Part of 2016-2017 Atlantic History Seminar: Africa and the Atlantic World
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
James Sweet, University of Wisconsin
Location:
3703 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of History
Contact:
Pernille Roge
Contact Email:
per20pitt.edu

Thursday, October 20

Talija
Time:
7:30 pm
Presenter:
Talija Art Company
Location:
Bellefield Hall, University of Pittsburgh
Announced by:
Global Studies Center on behalf of
Cost:
$13 General Admission
Contact Phone:
(412) 370-8182
Contact Email:
bstafura@gmail.com

Talija Art Company was established in 1998 in Belgrade, Serbia. Representing a rich and colorful program, Talija performs folk music and dance from all regions of former Yugoslavia, as well as from Hungary, Romania, Russia and Bulgaria. Their core repertoire is comprised of the customs and folk tales gathered from these cultures, and the troupe uses motion as the element building the colorful traditions of music and dance together. Over the past 18 years, Talija has displayed more than 4,000 performances throughout the world.This fall, they will be touring USA once again, and more importantly, visiting our very own city of Pittsburgh.
Carica Milica and Folk Factory will be guest performers.

Friday, October 28

Making Climate Policy: A Historical Simulation
Time:
11:00 am to 3:30 pm
Presenter:
Allyson Delnore, Veronica Dristas, Michaël Aklin
Location:
233 David E Lawrence
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center along with Department of Geology and Environmental Science, Freshman Programs and Reacting Consortium
Contact:
Allyson Delnore
Contact Email:
adelnore@pitt.edu

As part of Pitt's International Week, the European Studies Center and Global Studies Center have partnered to offer students a chance to participate in a simulation of an important period in the history of international climate policy negotiations. The effects of un-checked industrial pollution in Europe were seen in the increase in acid rain and a stark die off of forested regions in northern and eastern Europe. In response, representatives from Europe's nations came together in a series of negotiations to determine what - if anything - could or even should be done. During this half-day event, students will immerse themselves into a role (representative from Poland, British diplomat, climate scientist) and participate in active negotiations. How did climate science impact policy negotiations? To what extent did national interests trump environmental concerns? And how did large industrial countries respond to complaints from smaller, down-wind countries? The negotiations take place between 1979 and 1989 against the backdrop of the end of the Cold War and the creation of the European Union. Here's your chance to participate in the making of history and the saving of the environment.

Wednesday, November 2

Global Issues Through Literature: Multicultural Societies
The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears
Time:
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Presenter:
Lisa Bromberg
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with Department of English
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Lisa Bromberg
Contact Email:
lrb62@pitt.edu

This debut novel by Dinaw Mengestu tells the story of an Ethiopian refugee living in Washington, D.C., and explores issues of racial, cultural, and national identities. Our discussion will be led by Professor Gayle Rogers of Pitt’s English department. Books and dinner are provided, as well as parking on Pitt’s campus and Act 48 hours. Please use the link to register.

Wednesday, November 9 to Sunday, November 13

Human Rights, Affordable Housing & Urban Development Strategies
As part of Housing Summit 2016
Time:
(All day)
Location:
TBA (various Community and University venues)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Housing Summit
Contact Email:
housing@pitt.edu

Pittsburgh’s economic re-development has earned it the reputation as a “most livable city.” But growing numbers of residents ask, “livable for whom?” It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the reality of a growing divide between two Pittsburghs—one affluent, professional, and largely white, and the other low-income people with long-term roots in the region, largely people of color.

The University-Community Housing Summit will provide a space for residents to come together with organizers and experts from around the world to learn about and discuss the global and local forces affecting people’s access to affordable housing and the efforts to address them. A series of public lectures, panels, workshops, and cultural events will facilitate learning and networking aimed at highlighting this issue on the public and policy agenda while advancing new thinking and community organization that can help Pittsburgh residents realize their human right to housing.

Keynote speakers, leaders in community activism, public policy, and scholarship, will contribute to discussions about the relationships between affordable housing, urban social movements, and globalization. Participatory workshops are designed to help participants learn skills to help them end discrimination and displacement while building a movement for housing justice and human rights.

Wednesday, November 9

Book Launch and Signing
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD
Location:
Kaufmann Center, Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium, 1825 Centre Avenue
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact Email:
housingp@pitt.edu

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, is a research psychiatrist at New York State Psychiatric Institute and a professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. Dr. Fullilove's research has focused on the health problems caused by inequity. She is the author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It, which profiles stories from Pittsburgh’s Hill District residents. She is currently leading a study of Main Streets in New Jersey. Many of the state’s more than 500 municipalities have a functioning Main Street. What are these streets like? What is their function in today's city? This project is examining these questions and others. For more information, visit www.mainstreetnj.blogspot.com

Thursday, November 10

Book Panel & Discussion with Dr. Mindy Fullilove
As part of Housing Summit 2016
Time:
12:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Location:
2017 Cathedral of Learning
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center along with School of Social Work

Panel discussing Dr. Fullilove's book, Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It. Panelists TBA and lunch provided.
Hosted by Pitt's School of Social Work

Keynote Address
"Where is home? How housing instability affects us all"
Time:
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Mindy Fullilove
Location:
120 David Lawrence Hall, University of Pittsburgh (3942 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260)
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, professor of urban policy and health, The New School. Fullilove has been studying epidemics in poor communities, with a focus on the relationship between urban form and mental well-being. In 2009, she launched a Main Street NJ, a study of the role in Main Streets as social and commercial centers. This study takes her to 100 Main Streets in the US, France, the Netherlands and Japan. She has authored/edited 5 books, including Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It.

Friday, November 11

Plenary Panel
Time:
7:00 pm
Location:
125 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact Email:
housingp@pitt.edu

Saturday, November 12

Speaker schedule TBA
Time:
9:00 am to 5:00 pm
Location:
Frick Fine Arts Building
Sponsored by:
Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free
Contact Email:
housingp@pitt.edu

Speaker schedule TBA

Speaker Biographies

Desiree Fields is an urban geographer at the University of Sheffield (UK). Her research theorizes the rise of financial markets, actors and imperatives as a contemporary process of global urban change. With a particular focus on housing, Fields is interested in how the link between real estate and finance is being reconstructed since the 2007-2008 global financial crisis, how residents experience this process, and its implications for housing policy and advocacy. She was trained as an environmental psychologist and urbanist at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. (link)

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, is a research psychiatrist at New York State Psychiatric Institute and a professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. Dr. Fullilove's research has focused on the health problems caused by inequity. She is the author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It, which profiles stories from Pittsburgh’s Hill District residents. She is currently leading a study of Main Streets in New Jersey. Many of the state’s more than 500 municipalities have a functioning Main Street. What are these streets like? What is their function in today's city? This project is examining these questions and others. For more information, visit www.mainstreetnj.blogspot.com.

Ernesto López-Morales is Associate Professor in the University of Chile and PhD in Urban Planning from the DPU, University College London. He is also associate researcher at the Centre for Social Conflict and Cohesion Studies (COES) where he focuses on land economic, gentrification, neoliberal urbanism and housing in Chile and Latin American cities. He is author of Urbanismo proempresarial y destrucción creativa (Redalyc, 2013), and co-author of: Planetary Globalization (Polity Press, 2016). He co-edited Global gentrifications: Uneven development and displacement (Policy Press, 2015). His other published research assesses exclusionary displacement through rent gap analysis in the urban redevelopment of inner Santiago, Chile. In addition to his academic work, López-Morales works in cooperation with activist organizations including the Movimiento de Pobladores Ukamau in Chile and the 06600 Plataforma Vecinal y Observatorio de la Colonia Juarez in Mexico .

Max Rameau is a Haitian born Pan-African theorist, campaign strategist, organizer and author. After moving to Miami, Florida in 1991, Max began organizing around a broad range of human rights issues impacting low-income Black communities, including Immigrant rights (particularly Haitian immigrants), economic justice, LGBTQ rights, voting rights, particularly for ex-felons and police abuse, among others. As a result of the devastating impacts of gentrification taking root during the housing "boom," in the summer of 2006 Max helped found the organization which eventually became known as Take Back the Land, to address 'Land' issues in the Black community. In October 2006, Take Back the Land seized control of a vacant lot in the Liberty City section of Miami and built the Umoja Village, a full urban shantytown, addressing the issues of land, self-determination and homelessness in the Black community. (Read more)

Rob Robinson, National Economic and Social Rights Initiative, Special Adviser to the Campaign to Restore National Housing Rights. He is co-founder of the Take Back the Land National Movement and a member of the US Human Rights Network. Rob spent two and a half years, homeless in Miami and ten months in a New York City homeless shelter. He eventually escaped his cycle of homelessness and has been in the housing movement in New York City since 2007. In the fall of 2009, Rob was chosen to be chairperson for the first ever official visit of a UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing. He is connected with housing movements in South Africa, Brazil, and other countries around the world. He is a member of a social justice media collective which produces and airs a monthly radio show over WBAI in New York City called Global Movements Urban Struggles

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