Upcoming Events

Wednesday, October 30

Thursday, October 31

UCIS International Career Toolkit Series: StrengthsFinder 2.0 Workshop

Seeking a career that you will enjoy? Want to leverage your talents to land that future job in international affairs, government, nonprofit, or business? Attend the StrengthsFinder 2.0 Workshop. Designed by the nationally known Gallup Company to help people capitalize on their greatest talents in the workplace and on teams.
Sign up to secure one of the 20 spots available.
https://signup.com/go/JWFjSmV
Visit Elaine Linn in Global Studies (4100 Posvar Hall) to receive a free access code. Take the test, print your 5 top strengths, and bring to the workshop on Oct. 31st at 4:30pm to incorporate these talents into future internships and careers.
Angela Illig, M.S., N.C.C., Gallup Certified StrengthsFinder Facilitator, will be conducting the workshop.
Location:
Posvar Hall, Rm 4130
4:30-6pm
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, European Union Center of Excellence and Global Studies Center

4:30pm to 6:00pm
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall

Friday, November 1

Let's Talk Africa Lecture Series: Ghana

Jennifer will present her research methods and findings on the role of ethics plays in Ghanaian women’s business leadership development programs. She describes the findings from her mixed methods research study on local business owners and business educators in Ghana. While previous research examines the role of small business entrepreneurs and the glass-ceiling challenges confronting women’s leadership development in Africa, this study examined the important role of ethics in women’s leadership development. This study also seeks to identify educational practices targeting women in business ethics and leadership and describe next steps required to improve ethical leadership development in Ghana and Africa. Jennifer has been conducting research on education, leadership, and women in Ghana since 2010.

1:00pm to 2:00pm
The Global Hub, First Floor Posvar Hall

Monday, November 4

1989 and All That: Transnational Political Upheaval and the Origins of Global Studies

The year 1989 witnessed momentous changes in global politics: the end of the Cold War, the acceleration of global neoliberal capitalism, and the start of a long decade of internationalism and interventionism -- G.H.W Bush's famous "New World Order."
In this conversation with Dr. William Brustein, Vice President for Global Strategies and International Affairs and Eberly Family Distinguished Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University and former Director of Pitt's University Center for International Studies, we explore how the events of 1989 and their aftermath contributed to the creation of Global Studies as a Field and as an academic enterprise.

4:00pm
4130 Posvar Hall

Monday, November 4

Tracing Cultural Exchanges in World History through Primary Sources: Beyond what WE got from THEM

In this workshop, participants will gain access to resources on teaching about cultural interactions as a topic of study. Using examples from the arts, technology and trade, we will explore primary sources that illustrate how to teach about these interactions through documents, objects, and artworks that represent modes of interaction. They will explore the story of classical knowledge and its transfer to Europe, as well as material culture such as foods and fabrics that moved across the eras to become global consumer products. Finally, we will discuss frameworks for teaching about the world that put the "global" into world history.
Dinner, parking, and Act 48 credit are provided. Register at https://forms.gle/bcMEw8qbPMDTS5zi7

4:30pm to 8:00pm
4130 Posvar Hall

Wednesday, November 13

Watch Party in the Global Hub!

Join us for a second screening of a new film about Pitt Alumna and 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Wangari Maathai of Kenya. Kenyan tea, snacks and free t-shirts provided for the first 20 attendees. We'll also share the Planting Ideas Action Guide, a booklet based on the documentary and the mission of The Green Belt Movement created by Wangari in Kenya. Wangari lived a life of planting both ideas and trees. Her legacy is best reflected in her own words:"It is the people who must save the environment. It is the people who must make their leaders change. And we cannot be intimidated. So we must stand up for what we believe in."
Be sure to visit her memorial garden and plaque featured on the front lawn of the Cathedral of Learning, Fifth Avenue Entrance.

5:00pm
The Global Hub, First Floor Posvar Hall

Wednesday, November 20

Exceptionalism and the New Mainstream: Explaining Orbán's Illiberal Regime in Hungary

Thirty years after the democratic transition in 1989, hybrid political cultures and peculiar, neither Western nor fully Eastern power practices seem to have taken root in the European semi-peripheries. Regional experts speak of de-globalization as the outcome of the emergence of populist and nationalist movements in both Western and Eastern Europe, and warn against the peculiar role the latter area might play—as it already did in the interwar period and during the Cold War—as a laboratory of authoritarian politics. This talk analyzes how, under prime minister Viktor Orbán, the former "model pupil" Hungary became the most visible and conceptually refined example of the rejection of liberal democracy, and provides some regional perspectives for how to tackle this challenge.
Dr. Stefano Bottoni received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Bologna in 2005. Currently a Senior Lecturer at the University of Florence, he was previously Senior Fellow at the Institute of History in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (2009-2019). His main fields of interest include the political and social history of Eastern Europe under the socialist regimes. His publications include The Long Awaited West. Eastern Europe since 1944 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, October 2017), and Stalin’s Legacy in Romania. The Hungarian Autonomous Region, 1952-1960 (Langham: Lexington Books, Harvard Cold War Series Book Series, 2018).

4:30pm
Simmons A, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University

Thursday, December 5

3:00pm to 5:00pm
540 William Pitt Union (WPU)