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Friday, February 23

CERIS Book Discussion, 2/23
Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane
Time:
6:00 pm
Presenter:
Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt
Announced by:
African Studies Program on behalf of Department of History
Contact Email:
amir.syed@pitt.edu

Beyond Timbuktu: an Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa, by Ousmane Kane. Faculty are invited to participate in the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) spring 2018 faculty book discussion at UPitt. Discussion at 6:00 PM. Amir Syed, Visiting Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World-UPitt will facilitate the book discussion. Ousmane Kane is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Religion & Society at Harvard.

This is Africa: Gala!
Time:
6:00 pm
Location:
0'Hara Ballroom
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with African Student Organization (ASO); School of Medicine
Contact Email:
macrina@pitt.edu

Fri, 2/23: This is Africa: Gala!
Time: 6:00PM
Details: Join us at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, the ASO, and ASP for ‘This is Africa: Gala’! " This is Africa" is a gala that aims to celebrate the achievements of people from the African diaspora as well as the people who have invested time in the continent and the people. This event also aims to bring together students, faculty and community members in a environment where they can network and get to know each other. This is a black tie/ traditional wear event so come looking nice, eat and enjoy great company, performances and music. Ballroom of the O’Hara Student Center, at 4042 O’Hara Street. Please RSVP and register your attendance tickets beforehand. Tickets limited for attendance...

Saturday, February 24

Teach Africa Workshop—K-16 Educators, Indigenous Wisdom and Culture
Time:
(All day)
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center along with School of Education
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Saturday, February 24, 2017, 9am-3:30pm

Join us at the University of Pittsburgh for the Teach Africa Workshop – Indigenous Wisdom and Culture on February 24, 2017. Learn how to use free multi-media curriculum units to Strengthen the teaching of African Studies in your classroom.

Breakout sessions will include discussions and demonstrations on integrating African Studies material into your classroom. Several examples are listed: #Me too: Connecting gender issues from Ethiopia to America, Through an African Lens: Positive Racial Identity Development, Best Practices for Integrating Languages Spoken in Africa, and even Incorporating Indigenous Ways of Knowing into STEAM Classrooms.
Speakers include experts from the Carnegie Museum of History, Fulbright Hays Educators who designed cutting edge multi-media Ethiopian curriculum units, and in the field language teachers.
All teachers and administrators are welcome whether you are an expert on teaching Africa or this is the first time you have even considered it.
Act 48 credits will be available to interested attendees with
Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register with Anna-Maria.

Contact Anna-Maria Karnes at 412-624-8143 or awk19@pitt.edu if you have any questions.

Thursday, March 1

THE 7TH ANNUAL MODEL AFRICAN UNION SIMULATION
Pittsburgh High Schools
Time:
(All day)
Location:
WILLIAM PITT UNION ASSEMBLY ROOM & BALLROOM
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

In 2011, a group of African Studies students at the University of Pittsburgh participated in the college level Model African Union at the Howard University in Washington DC. After their experience in the simulation, they felt the need to promote the study of Africa among high school students in the Pittsburgh and South-Western Pennsylvania region. With the assistance of The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh, the Pitt High School Model African Union (MAU) was launched in 2012 as an experiential pedagogical method of teaching American students about Africa. The Pitt MAU serves as an educational simulation that provides opportunities for high school students to learn about Africa by studying the African Union and its inner workings. Students learn the role, structure, and performance of the African Union (AU) while searching for solutions to Africa’s key economic, social, and political problems. Agenda items and countries are assigned to the participating schools in advance, to allow for adequate preparations for the daylong conference. Under the guidance of their teachers, students study research issues facing the AU member states and prepare to hold debates and vote on resolutions that address these issues. This year, 2018, is the seventh year of the MAU hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

Saturday, March 17

Let's Explore Africa Quiz Competition!
Road to 2018 National Championship
Time:
10:30 am
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Let's Explore Africa Quiz Competition for 4th-7th grade students! 4th-7th grade @10:30am, 8th to 12th grade @11:30am!

Register at www.letsexploreafrica.net!

Purpose and Mission-
Let's Explore Africa is a quiz competition about Africa. Africa, the second largest continent in the world and home to over a billion people is perhaps the most misunderstood region on the planet. To some it is a country, to many it is an area plagued with diseases, and to a few it is just a safari. Dr. Sandra Frempong, an accountant and educator wrote books and created the quiz competition to help broaden people's knowledge about the continent. The quiz competition started in 2014. Contestants have thoroughly enjoyed playing the fun trivia and learn more about Africa as they navigate the continent from Cape Town to Casablanca. Players answer multiple choice questions at various difficulty levels. Questions highlights geography, entertainment, people, literature, symbols, resources, etc.

Eligibility- The competition is open to the general public, admission is free and the minimum age to compete is ten (10). There are tournaments for K-12 and college students. We strongly encourage and welcome schools to participate. Eligible k-12 students will compete at grade levels as follows
Level 1 = (4th - 6th graders)
Level 2 = (7th - 9th graders)
Level 3 = (10th - 12th graders)

Quiz Rules
1) The competition will be offered in two rounds.
2) Student can compete as a team or as individual for the preliminary round.
3) In Round 1 (first 20-30 trivia questions) student/s with the most correct answers will advance to Round 2 (final).
4) In the final round, the match-up will be team versus team or individual versus individual. Therefore, if only one team remains, the group members from that team shall select a delegate who will compete against other 'individual' students. However, should the reverse be the case, that one student will have the option to compete alone against the remaining teams.
5) Round Two (second 40-60 trivia questions): Student/s with the most correct answers is the winner.
6) If there is a tie, a tiebreaker question will be offered.

How much do YOU know about Africa? You are invited to join us in this fun, educational quiz competition. Come and test your knowledge. Be a contestant!
Let’s Explore Africa!

Monday, March 19

Critical Research on Africa
China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway
Time:
4:00 pm
Presenter:
Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University
Location:
3703 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center

China-Africa Railway Crossings: Building the TAZARA Railway

Jamie Monson, PhD, Department of History, Michigan State University

Professor Jamie Monson became interested in Africa when she served as an agriculture volunteer for the Peace Corps in rural Kenya in 1980. She then completed her PhD in African History at UCLA, and took her first teaching position at Carleton College in 1991. In 2015, she accepted a position as a Professor of African History in the Department of History and Director of African Studies at Michigan State University. Monson’s early research focus was on agricultural and environmental history of southern Tanzania, and she has also worked on anti-colonial warfare in German East Africa. In the late 1990s, she began a new research project on the history of the TAZARA railway, built with Chinese development aid in Tanzania and Zambia in the 1960s and 1970s. Her book, Africa’s Freedom Railway, was published by Indiana University Press in 2011.

Most recently, Monson has been studying the history of China-Africa relations (and learning Chinese), and frequently performs research in China. Her new project is a study of technology transfer in the history of Chinese development assistance to Africa. A second project that she is also engaged in uses records of visits made by African women’s delegations to China during the Cultural Revolution to examine gendered aspects of civil diplomacy.

Thursday, March 22

Let's Talk Africa Series: Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Success
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Anna-Maria Karnes
Location:
Room 4217 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program

Education in Ethiopia: Challenges Women Face in the Pursuit of Higher Education

Thursday March 22nd, 2018 - 12 – 1:30 pm Room 4217 WWPH

Triumph through Adversity: The Tenacious Ethiopian Woman and Her Rise to Educational Success
Some women will do anything to get an education. Embark on a journey of stories that will take you into the heart of a rural Ethiopian women who strives for an education. Stories that will make you laugh, cry, and be thankful for your own educational journey and appreciate the paths some women must create.Anna-Maria Karnes will share her research work in Ethiopia exploring the challenges women face in Higher Education. The numbers of women enrolled at the higher education level are very low compared to men. For example, in 2011, only 27% of all students enrolled in a university were women (Ministry of Education, 2011). In an attempt to increase access to higher education for women affirmative action provisions are being made to ensure equal rights in these universities. The government has also declared financial help to women who wish to pursue education (Prime Minister Office/women’s Affairs Sub Sector, 2004). Despite support from the UN and the Ethiopian government, women continue to face challenges of staying in school. According to Ethiopian academics. Anna-Maria will discuss her findings during her research tenure visiting Ethiopia and teaching in the university in the summer of 2016.

Saturday, March 24

Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference
Creativity, Innovation, and Resilience: Rethinking Challenges and Opportunities in Africa
Time:
(All day)
Location:
University of Pittsburgh
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program along with Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) and U.S. Department of Education
Contact Email:
ydc1@pitt.edu

The African Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to announce its inaugural, regional one-day conference on Saturday, March 24, 2018. The Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes African Studies Conference creates a space for the sharing of ideas and broader intellectual engagement for Africanist faculty, researchers, and graduate students from across the Mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes regions. Seeing the need for opportunities for scholarly development and networking among educators and researchers in African Studies outside of the annual meeting of the African Studies Association, we invite Africanists from universities, community colleges, HBCUs, and other academic institutions in the neighboring states of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, Indiana, Michigan, and New York to participate in the conference. The larger goal is to stimulate a regional intellectual community for Africanist scholars and researchers across a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds and institutions.

The keynote speaker for the conference will be Dr. Moses Ochonu, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of History in the Department of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of three books (including Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was a finalist for the 2015 Herskovits prize), numerous articles, and is a frequent public commentator on history and politics in Nigeria and the larger African continent. Co-sponsors for this conference also include the Department of Africana Studies, the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and the U.S. Department of Education.

The conference organizers have limited travel funds available to support conference participants who are more than three hours away from the University of Pittsburgh. If you are interested, please contact Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu to request an application for travel funds.

Registration for the conference is free and breakfast and lunch will be provided. The deadline for conference abstracts is March 1, 2018. To present at the conference, please submit an abstract of 150 to 200 words through the online registration form. Participants will be notified of their acceptance within one week of the abstract deadline. A conference website with the full agenda will also be posted before the conference takes place.

Register and Submit Abstracts here: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8DrDS8WEoTbhm4d

You may also register on the website of the University of Pittsburgh African Studies program: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/africa/

Please direct any questions or concerns to Yolanda Covington-Ward at ydc1@pitt.edu.

Tuesday, April 3

1968: The Year that Rocked Pittsburgh
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Location:
4130 Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center along with University Honors College

Presented by Emily Ruby or the Heinz History Center. Part of the Global Legacies of 1968 Series, sponsored by the University Honors College.

Wednesday, April 4

Let's Talk Africa Series: Hang Them! Popular Music and the Politics of Participation and Belonging in Homophobic Uganda
Time:
12:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Charles Lwanga
Location:
4130 WWPH
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Hang Them! Popular Music and the Politics of Participation and Belonging in Homophobic Uganda

Wednesday April 4, 2018 - 12 – 1:30pm - 4130 WWPH

Dr. Charles Lwanga is a recent graduate of the School of Music He holds a Ph.D in Composition and Theory (2012) and a Ph.D in Ethnomusicology (2018) from the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently a visiting assistant professor of Music at Skidmore College in New York where he teaches theory and ethnomusicology. He will be sharing his research and work experience as a composer.

Friday, April 13

Critical Research on Africa
Healing Communities: The Convergence of Environment, Slavery, and Spirituality in the African-Atlantic World
Time:
2:00 pm
Presenter:
Ras Michael Brown
Location:
3800 WWPH, Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program and Global Studies Center
Contact Email:
AWK19@pitt.edu

Healing Communities: The Convergence of Environment, Slavery, and Spirituality in the African-Atlantic World

Friday April 13, 2018, 2:00 – 4:00 PM, 4130 WWPH

Ras Michael Brown, PhD, Department of History, Southern Illinois University

Dr. Ras Michael Brown holds a joint appointment in History and Africana Studies and teaches courses on World History, the African Diaspora, the Atlantic World, and Religion. He researches the religious and environmental cultures of African-descended people throughout the African-Atlantic Diaspora with particular attention given to the cultures of West-Central Africans and their descendants in the United States South. His book, African-Atlantic Cultures and the South Carolina Lowcountry (Cambridge University Press, 2012), examines perceptions of the natural world in the religious ideas and practices of African-descended communities in the Lowcountry from the colonial period into the twentieth century. African-Atlantic Cultures and the South Carolina Lowcountry has been awarded the 2013 Albert J. Raboteau Book Prize for the Best Book in Africana Religions by the Journal of Africana Religions. Professor Brown's current projects include articles on the diverse kinds of encounters maintained by African-descended people with Catholic and Protestant Christianity, the contested and convergent meanings of the natural environment among enslaved people and enslavers in the South Carolina Lowcountry, and the special--though often overlooked--significance of nature spirits in African-Atlantic religious cultures. Additionally, his new book project explores the relationships between people and nature spirits in expanding the cultivation of "Atlantic" crops in Africa and the Diaspora and in developing ties to the spiritual landscapes of the Americas from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century.

Tuesday, April 17

1968: What Have We Learned
Time:
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Louis Picard, James Cook, Jae-Jae Spoon, Michael Goodhart, Scott Morgenstern, Nancy Condee
Location:
4130 Posvar
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center
Cost:
Free and open to the public
Contact:
Jae-Jae Spoon
Contact Email:
spoonj@pitt.edu

Friday, April 27

UCIS Graduation Celebration
Time:
3:00 pm
Location:
Ballroom, O'Hara Student Center
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, European Studies Center and Global Studies Center

Students from all UCIS centers graduating in Spring and Summer 2018 are invited with their families to join this UCIS wide ceremony celebrating their completion of the certificate or BPHIL/IAS.