Events


View a comprehensive calendar of events.

Monday, March 25

Russian Conversation Table
Time:
6:15 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Tuesday, March 26

Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Time:
1:30 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

Thursday, March 28

Exhibit Talk, Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Ground Floor Lobby
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Join us for an Exhibit Talk on the current Hillman Library exhibit, Travelers Along the Silk Roads: 10th Century to the Present. This talk is part of a series of events including faculty and guest speakers and films. The Exhibit Talk will begin in the Ground Floor Lobby of Hillman Library then move to the Second Floor.

From Komsomol to NGO: Experts, Activists, and Changing Paradigms of Development in Central Asia and Beyond
Silk Roads Rising Guest Speaker Series
Time:
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm
Presenter:
Artemy Kalinovsky
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Thornburgh Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Presented by Artemy Kalinovsky, Senior Lecturer, East European Studies, University of Amsterdam.

This event is a part of the Guest Speaker Series of Silk Roads Rising: Globalization and Exchange from the 10th Century to the Present

Peering Under the Rug: Sources of Information about Russia
Time:
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Mark Galeotti, Maxim Trukolyubov, Kevin Rothrock
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Political Science and Department of History
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Mark Galeotti, Senior Associate Fellow at Royal United Services Institute

Maxim Trudolyubov, Vedomosti, Kennan Institute

Kevin Rothrock, Meduza

A popular meme about Russian politics is that it’s like “bulldogs fighting under a rug.” Namely, it’s opaque, shadowy, full of rumors, and driven by conspiracies. This image have become more common in the West over Putin’s long reign, and intensified since Russia’s interference in the 2016 US Presidential election. Where can we turn for clearer vision given the supposed murkiness of Russian politics? This moderated roundtable discussion with Mark Galeotti, Maxim Trudolubov, and Kevin Rothrock will explore media and human sources of information about contemporary Russia and its many promises and roadblocks.

Friday, March 29 to Saturday, March 30

Symposium | Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies
Time:
(All day)
Presenter:
Varies
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at http://soyuz.americananthro.org/symposium/.

Friday, March 29

Keynote Speaker: Soyuz Symposium
Time:
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Presenter:
Manduhai Buyandelger
Location:
5317 Sennot Square
Sponsored by:
Asian Studies Center, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies and Global Studies Center along with Pitt Global and Department of Anthropology
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Keynote Address by Manduhai Buyandelger, Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT, Author of Tragic Spirits: Shamanism, Gender and Memory in Contemporary Mongolia, "Self-Polishing and Electoral Selves: Elections and The New Economies of Democratization in Postsocialist Mongolia"

Saturday, March 30

Serbian Movie Festival: The Great War 1914-1918
Time:
1:00 pm
Presenter:
Irinej Dobrijevic and Krinka Vidakovic
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Nationality Rooms, Pitt Global and Serb National Federation
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Book presented by Bishop Irinej and Krinka V. Petrov. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

The book is dedicated to the Great War, an event that shook the world one hundred years ago. Within this vast historical frame-work, this book focuses on the relationship between two Allies—the Kingdom of Serbia and the United States of America, including the role of the Serbian American Diaspora. The chapters in this book deal with general issues regarding Serbia’s role in the Great War, beginning with the event that would trigger the war and put the small town of Sarajevo on the world map. This book offers a wealth of information as well as a fascinating narrative of the human urge to resist, survive, and be free to live and love.

Serbian Movie Festival: The Long Road to War
Time:
2:30 pm
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

This film screening is part of the Serbian Film Festival. The Long Road to War directed by Milos Skundric. Pizza and light refreshments served.

What was a real cause and trigger of World War I? World War I began a month after the Sarajevoassassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, in 1914. But this stake had been prepared decades before. The Long Road to War is a feature-length cinema documentary about the origins of WWI. Leading European intellectuals from Oxford, Cambridge, Sorbonne, and other universities present their views about the causes and trigger of World War I. The movie leads the public through the political games behind the scenes and presents details when the decision was made about the future of Europe. The documentary utilizes film and photographs from some fifteen archival houses
around the world, so it is “more action – less talking heads on screen.” Milos Skundric, Director, says that he was shocked to learn how little he and his generation knew about the reason behind this “seminal catastrophe of the 20th century.”

Serbian Movie Festival: Twice Upon a Time
Time:
4:45 pm
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

This event is part of the Serbian Movie Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served.

Twice Upon a Time, directed by Vojin Vasovic.
All children for the cartoon will receive a gift from the SNF.
This is an amusing and educational cartoon for children and adults. Once upon a time, in some distant world lived two kings: King of Warrior and King of Poet. In fact, it is about the dual nature and split personality of one king. One half of his personality represents a Nordic barbaric king from the early Middle Ages, a crude but fearless warrior. The other half is from late Baroque, a man of graceful poise and manners. They share their conscience, but have opposing wishes and desperately want to get rid of each other. This story brings us a noble message which can enrich our lives. The cartoon was screened at 60 international movie festivals and won more than 20 international awards.

Serbian Movie Festival: Tesla Nation
Time:
6:00 pm
Location:
Cathedral of Learning, Room 232
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Yugoslav Nationality Room, Pitt Global, Nationality Rooms and Serb National Federation
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

This film screening is a part of the Serbian Film Festival. Pizza and light refreshments will be served. Tesla Nation directed by Zeljko Mirkovic.

This marvelous documentary leads us through the Serbian-American history which spans more than 200 years. Serbian-American history began in a symbolic way with Djordje Sagic aka George Fisher who arrived through the port of Philadelphia at the beginning of the ninetieth century. After him, Serbian immigrants came in several waves and helped shape American history. The movie describes Serbian-American contributions
in building the United States and the world and the importance of preserving the Serbian heritage. Zeljko Jack Dimich, the Serbian-American Actor from New York, plays Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American Scientist and Inventor, and is the narrator of the movie. The movie was sponsored by the Serb National Federation among others, and produced by Optimistic Film and Radio Television of Serbia.

Monday, April 1

Fulbright Opportunities for Faculty and Students in the Visegrad Countries and Beyond
Time:
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. Károly Jókay, Executive Director, Fulbright Hungary
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Room 3911
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Pitt University Honors College and Pitt Global
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Join us for this information session to learn about Fulbright program grants for students and faculty in Hungary, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Romania, and Bulgaria.

An expert in municipal finance and bankruptcy, Jókay taught municipal finance, public budgeting and public management in the Department of Public Policy at Central European University between 2005 and 2017. Jókay has extensive experience in Central and Eastern European countries, including Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia, completing projects on municipal bond disclosure standards, public utility transformation and regulation in the municipal services sector, as well as municipal debt regulation. He was born in Chicago to Hungarian parents, earned a B.A. in Economics from the University of Michigan and has an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Illinois. Jókay moved to Hungary in 1994, became active in several civil society organizations, and established a family foundation to support the education of poor, rural children in the High School of the Reformed Church in Pápa.

Russian Conversation Table
Time:
6:15 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Tuesday, April 2

Shaping National Memory: Ukrainian Secret Police Archives and WWII
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Jared McBride
Location:
Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of History and Department of Political Science
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Jared McBride, University of California, Los Angeles

Following the Maidan Revolution, the Ukrainian government opened the former KGB archives after years of ambiguous policies. The impetus was mostly political: to show the Ukrainian nation as a victim of Russian/Soviet aggression and to valorize controversial Ukrainian nationalist movements. Former police archives, however, make for poor political props. This live interview with Jared McBride will discuss these archives, the ways scholarly work has often been at odds with the archive as a tool to remake civil society, and place of police archives in the larger contexts of post-Soviet Eastern Europe.

Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Time:
1:30 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

Thursday, April 4 to Saturday, April 6

American Hungarian Educators Association - 44th Annual Conference
Time:
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
Contact:
Zsuzsanna Magdo
Contact Email:
zsuzsannamagdo@pitt.edu

Thursday, April 4

Screening: Mom and Other Loonies in the Family
Time:
7:00 pm
Presenter:
Dr. János Kenyeres, University of Toronto
Location:
David Lawrence Hall 121
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with American Hungarian Educators Association
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

This film presents the story of four generations of Hungarian women in the 20th century--“loonies” who are led by the character of a mother who lived 94 years and moved 27 times in her life. Moving seems to have been her only way of confronting troubles, dangers, and conflicts. In reality, it was major historical events that chased her throughout Hungary and made her go through a terrible century. At the incredible age of 94, Mom tells the story of these events to her daughter, nearly 100 years of often mischievous and heart-warming but also sometimes painful episodes.

Dr. János Kenyeres (University of Toronto) will introduce the film before the screening.

Bio: János Kenyeres graduated from Eötvös Loránd University in English and Hungarian literature in 1991 and earned his doctoral degree in literary studies from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 2000. He is currently Visiting Professor of Hungarian at the University of Toronto, where his work focuses on Hungarian literature, cinema and culture. At his home institution, the Eötvös Loránd University, he is Director of the School of English and American Studies and teaches English and Canadian literature, Canadian cinema, and literary theory.

Friday, April 5

Keynote Speaker: American Hungarian Educators Association Conference
Time:
9:00 am
Presenter:
János Kenyeres
Location:
Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Room 5604
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Keynote Address by János Kenyeres, (Eötvös Loránd University, Director of School of English and American Studies): Manifestations of Hungarian Identity in Literature.

This event is part of the American Hungarian Educators Association Conference April 4 - 6, 2019.

Monday, April 8

Russian Conversation Table
Time:
6:15 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Tuesday, April 9

Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Time:
1:30 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

Wednesday, April 10

The Silk Road on Screen: The Orator
Time:
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm
Presenter:
Olia Kim
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Latin American Lecture Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with University Library System (ULS) and Year of Pitt Global
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

This film is about a young man recalling his grandfather, who during the days of the revolution became the leading political speaker in Uzbekistan even though he retained all three of his wives.

Running Time: 81 minutes

Introduction by Olia Kim, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh

Friday, April 12

European & Eurasian Undergraduate Research Symposium 2019
Time:
(All day)
Location:
TBA
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, European Studies Center and International Business Center along with Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and GOSECA
Contact:
Gina Peirce
Contact Phone:
4126482290
Contact Email:
gbpeirce@pitt.edu

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event since 2002 designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or Central Eurasia. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus. After the initial submission of papers, selected participants are grouped into panels according to their research topics. The participants then give 10- to 15-minute presentations based on their research to a panel of faculty and graduate students. The presentations are open to the public.

Monday, April 15

Russian Conversation Table
Time:
6:15 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Tuesday, April 16

Russian Tutoring with Katya Kovaleva
Time:
1:30 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Meet with our Russian tutor Katya Kovaleva in 201D Hillman Library if you need help with your homework or want to prepare for your tests and exams.

Thursday, April 18

The Stories Polish Secret Police Files Tell Us
Time:
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Presenter:
Anna Krakus
Location:
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of History and Department of Political Science
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
4126487407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Anna Krakus, University of Southern California

Police files tend to catalog a suspect’s crime. Police files in communist countries, however, go much further and document a suspect’s biography. This was the case in Polish police files where genres of biography and criminal surveillance blurred, turning the cop into a kind of literary author. Communist police files, therefore, told stories—not just about the factual and fictive biographical characteristics of a subject, but also intimate aspects of their personal lives and relationships. This live interview with Anna Krakus will delve into the police as author and the ways police files reflected literary elements that intersected with literary genres found in communist Poland.

The Rediscovery of Sogdian: The Lingua Franca of the Medieval Silk Road
Silk Roads Rising Guest Speaker Series
Time:
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm
Presenter:
Nicholas Sims-Williams
Location:
Hillman Library, First Floor - Thornburgh Room
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Presented by Nicholas Sims-Williams, Emeritus Professor of Iranian and Central Asian Studies, SOAS University of London.

This event is part of the Guest Speaker Series of Silk Roads Rising: Globalization and Exchange from the 10th Century to the Present.

Monday, April 22

Russian Conversation Table
Time:
6:15 pm
Location:
Hillman Library, Room 201D
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

Come to 201D Hillman and have an informal conversation in Russian with other Russian program students and the facilitator, Katya Kovaleva.

Friday, April 26

REEES Graduation Celebration
Time:
12:00 pm
Location:
229 Alcoa Room, Barco Law Building
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Students graduating in Spring and Summer 2019 from the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures are invited with their families to join this ceremony celebrating the completion of their various degrees and credentials.

UCIS Graduation
Time:
3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Location:
O'Hara Student Center Ballroom/Dining Room
Sponsored by:
African Studies Program, Asian Studies Center, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies, Director's Office, European Studies Center, Global Studies Center, Nationality Rooms, Office of International Services and Study Abroad Office

Monday, May 6 to Saturday, May 11

Shadow Empire: Russian Film Symposium
Time:
(All day)
Location:
Varies
Sponsored by:
Center for Russian East European and Eurasian Studies along with Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities Center, University Center for International Studies, Film Studies Program, Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures and Cultural Studies Program
Contact:
Sera Passerini
Contact Phone:
412-648-7407
Contact Email:
smp125@pitt.edu

The twenty-first annual Russian Film Symposium will focus on the consequences of Muscovite Russia’s by-passing the stages of nation formation in favor of a leap directly into empire as a consequence of its conquest under Tsar Ivan IV (the Terrible) of the Khanate of Kazan in 1552 and Astrakhan in 1554. The sudden expansion of ethnicities, nationalities, language groups, as well as territory necessitated the formation of a strong central state (Moscow) and administration to control and oversee the numerous polities that constituted the newly emerged empire. From Ivan IV through Peter I (the Great), and Nicholai II, the state and its constantly expanding apparatus exercised autocratic control over a sixth of the planet, several hundred language speaking communities and ethnicities. While this control was always maintained in the name of (Holy) Russia, Russia as a nation was singularly absent.

Even during the seventy years of Soviet rule, “Russian” was conspicuously absent: while each of the other fourteen Soviet republics had their own Union on Writers or Union of Composers (or unions of the other arts), there was never a Russian Union of Writers or Filmmakers; while each of the republics had its own Academy of Sciences, there was never a need for a Russian Academy of Sciences. The umbrella group was always Soviet Union of Writers or Soviet Academy of Sciences. Whether Romanov or Soviet—the “anti-imperial empire”—nation formation was never an issue. Instead, the imperial state was the dominant (if often concealed or simply assumed) model for thinking about issues of “Russianness.”

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 quickly led to the establishment of corresponding organizations (of writers, filmmakers, academics, etc.) this time labelled Russian. Existence de facto, however, does not translate into existence de jure. All of these organizations are merely extensions of the ever-consolidating Russian state under President Putin. The entire budgets for each of these organizations is allocated directly by the state, which closely monitors their adherence to state policy and practices, including limiting print and stage runs, banning films (especially those that deal with Russo-Soviet atrocities committed to other ethnicities within the empire), imprisoning directors (film and theater) on patently false charges, etc. In effect, Russia’s struggle with nationhood has not yet broken out of the iron fist of the state.

The Symposium will screen twelve films (four in subtitled DCP prints and eight on subtitled DVD), will host eight panels with film scholars from Russia, the UK, and the US, and two roundtables for the participants to continue debating the issues raised during the post-screening discussions at the film panels and to examine the overall topic for that year’s Symposium.