'Conversations On Europe' Videoconferences

COVID-19 Response

COVID-19 Response: Learn how the European Studies Center is working under the current operational posture at ucis.pitt.edu/esc/covid.

Conversations On Europe connects top experts from around the United States and Europe to discuss contemporary issues facing Europe and the Transatlantic relationship. Using both personal and institutional videoconference technology, panelists take questions and interact with audiences at Pitt and at remote sites in the US and Europe. Conversations On Europe is free and open to the public. All sessions will be held from 12-1:30 PM (EST) in Posvar Hall, Room 4217, unless otherwise stated.  A complete library of video resources to enhance transatlantic conversations is also now available.  In addition, you can veiw the full Playlist for Conversations on Europe on the Pitt Global Channel of YouTube. Please note, however, that the supplemental materials are only available by clicking on the topics listed below.

  • The list of upcoming topics and links to register are available on the AY20-21 Schedule 

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series. Please take our survey.

Free Trade or Protectionism? Isolationism amidst globalization

In this installment of the European Studies Center's award-winning series of virtual roundtables, a panel of experts discusses the mid-2016 political and popular debates over free trade and trade agreements in the US and Europe. Why have NAFTA and TPP become such political hot potatoes in the 2016 election cycle? What accounts for popular hostility to TTIP in Germany and other European nations? How did trade deals impact the Brexit vote and what impact will that vote have on on-going and future trade negotiations?

The Continent is Cut Off! British Referendum on the EU

This June citizens in the United Kingdom will vote on that country’s place in Europe. At a time of rising Euroscepticism there and across Europe, Great Britain will decide if it is better off facing the range of challenges to the European project—economic growth, migration, terrorism, conflict on its borders—by itself or as part of the EU.

Whose Legacy? Museums and National Heritage Debates

Our panel of experts discuss the ethical and legal questions museums in the Europe and North America face in the on-going debates over art repatriation, conservation, and national vs. universal heritage.

The Rise of the Right: Comparing the American and European Political Landscapes

Across much of Europe, in Scandinavia, Austria, the Netherlands and Poland, rightwing parties have surged in the polls, in elections and in some cases to governing power.

The Climate for Climate Change Negotiations

The UN Climate Change Conference (COP 21 / CMP 11) taking place in Paris November 30-December 11, 2015 seeks to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2⁰C.

Rescue & Prevent: Responses to Europe's Migration Crisis

As hundreds of thousands of migrants flee conflicts in their home countries, Europe has become their goal at any cost. The flood of migrants crossing Europe’s land and sea borders has left the EU member states with no consensus on how to handle the crisis.

Europe's Jews: Past, Present, Future?

By all accounts, the number of anti-Semitic incidences—including violent attacks on synagogues, businesses and individuals—has reached a postwar high across Europe. Official responses and those of community leaders have varied, as have explanations. Some point to the re-emergence of age-old European attitudes or populist political parties while others suggest a link to Europe’s changing demographic or a reflection of the unresolved Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This Conversation will explore the current situation of Jewish communities in light of Europe’s past and with a view toward the future. Center Director Ron Linden will moderate.

Conversations Sur l’Europe: La Langue et l’Identité dans le Monde Francophone

Dans le monde francophone, quelles sont les relations entre l’identité linguistique, l’identité nationale, le sexe, et la sexualité?

Dans cette séance de Conversations sur l'Europe, on discute cette question avec le panel d’experts suivant:

-- Abdellah Taïa, écrivain marocain d’expression française
-- Denis Provencher, professeur de français et de la communication interculturelle à l’Université de Maryland Baltimore County
-- Nadia Fadil, professeur au Centre de recherches sociologiques, KU Leuven

Animée par Jeanette Jouili, professeur d’études religieuses à l’Université de Pittsburgh

Cette conversation est entièrement en français.

Back to School at What Cost? Comparing Higher Education Models in the US and Europe

In this installment of the University of Pittsburgh's European Studies Center's monthly virtual roundtables series, a panel of experts reflects upon some of the most significant differences between the US and European models of higher education. In particular, they look at the question of who pays for students to go to University, and how much it costs both the individual and society. The panel participants include: Dr. John Weidman (Professor of Higher and International Development Education, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh), Professor Liudvika Leisyte (Professor of Higher Education, Center for Higher Education at TU Dortmund, Germany), Dr. John Douglass (Senior Research Fellow in Public Policy and Higher Education at the University of California at Berkeley), and Goldie Blumenstyk (Senior Writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education). European Studies Center Director Ron Linden moderates.

Before There Was Ebola: European Responses to Diseases in Africa - Past and Present

U.S. and European news coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted the urgency of the public health crisis, focusing often on the need to contain the outbreak to prevent its spread to “our shores.” Implicit (and often explicit) in these stories, however, were long-standing xenophobic and racialized attitudes toward African diseases that can be traced back to European imperial and pseudo-scientific ideas of the nineteenth century. This month’s Conversation will ask historians, political scientists, and public health experts to discuss the extent to which contemporary European and U.S. representations of Ebola borrowed from representations of earlier diseases occurring on the African continent and to speculate on the possible implications that such representations had and continue to have on mounting an effective response to an ongoing public health crisis. How much has news coverage contributed to what one political scientist described as the “long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place” and what can be done about it? Participants include Deborah Neill, Associate Professor of History, York University; Mari Webel, Assistant Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh; Guillaume Lachenal, Lecturer, Université Paris Diderot; and Jessica Pearson-Patel, Assistant Professor of International and Area Studies, University of Oklahoma. Audience participation is welcome and encouraged.

Co-sponsored by the University of Illinois' European Union Center (EUC), Center for Global Studies (CGS), Center for African Studies (CAS), Global Health Initiative, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Global Studies Program