Conversations and Commentaries on Europe: Video Resources

COVID-19 Response

COVID-19 Response: Learn how the European Studies Center is working under the current operational posture at ucis.pitt.edu/esc/covid.

 

ESC has online video offerings for select items from its extensive programming.  These resources are meant to ehance transatlantic conversations happening and enrich understandings of Europe here in the United States.

Resources can be used as classroom aids, out-of-classroom assignments, or as background for research papers.  Please provide proper citation of any of the resources used (examples below). Please let us know how you are using the videos! Send a message to europeanstudies@pitt.edu with your stories. 

You can also watch our collection on the UCIS YouTube Channel.

Citation examples:

  • MLA
    European Studies Center. "Title of Video." University of Pittsburgh, Date it was posted, URL.
     
  • APA
    [European Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh]. (Year, Month Day it was posted). Title of the Video [Video file]. Retrieved from URL.
     
  • Chicago
    European Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh. "Title of Video." YouTube video, length. Date published. URL.

 

Trade, Technology, and the Transatlantic Relationship
A conversation with European Commission Executive Vice Preseidnet Valdis Dombrovskis

September 30, 2021

 

 

 

 

COP26 and the European Green Deal, Europe's Response to Climate Change

The United Nation's much hyped Climate Conference convened representatives from around the globe. In this session, our panel of experts discussed what happened in Glasgow, European leaders' reactions to the conference outcomes, and what role Europe is taking in international efforts to respond to climate change and climate-driven migration.

PANELISTS:
Patrick Bayer
University of Strathclyde

Shanti Gamper-Rabindran
University of Pittsburgh

Katharine Rietig
Newcastle University

Rosemary McCarney
University of Toronto

MODERATOR:
Jae-Jae Spoon
University of Pittsburgh

REFERENCES:

  • Bayer, Patrick and Federica Genovese. 2020. “Beliefs about Climate Action Consequences under Weak Global Institutions: Sectors, Home Bias, and International Embeddedness.” Global Environmental Politics. 20(4):28-50.
  • Bayer, Patrick and Michaël Aklin. 2020. “The European Union Emissions Trading System Reduced CO2 Emissions Despite Low Prices.” Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences 117(16): 8804-8812.
  • Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti. 2018. “The Shale Dilemma: A Global Perspective on Fracking and Shale Development”, editor and contributor, University of Pittsburgh Press.
  • McCarney, Rosemary and Jonathan Kent. 2020. “Forced Displacement and Climate Change: Time for Global Governance.” International Journal. 75(4): 652-661.
  • Rietig K. 2021. “Learning in Governance: Climate Policy Integration in the European Union.” MIT Press.
  • Rietig K. 2021. “Accelerating Low Carbon Transitions via Budgetary Processes? EU Climate Governance in Times of Crisis.” Journal of European Public Policy. 28(7), 1018-1037.
  • Rietig K. 2020. “Multilevel Reinforcing Dynamics: Global Climate Governance and European Renewable Energy Policy.” Public Administration. 99(1), 55-71.

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

An Uneven Recovery? Health Outcomes and Economic Impacts Across Europe

The effects of COVID-19 have been felt unevenly across Europe, a trend which continues into the recovery from the pandemic. In this panel, experts discussed how these inequalities have been felt on an individual level and at the national level in terms of health and educational outcomes and economic impacts.

PANELISTS:
Holly Jarman
University of Michigan

Julia Lynch
University of Pennsylvania

Martin Myant
European Trade Union Institute

Sylke Schnepf
JRC-European Commission

MODERATOR:
Jae-Jae Spoon
University of Pittsburgh

REFERENCES:

  • Bambra C, Lynch J, Smith K. “The Unequal Pandemic: Covid-19 and Health Inequalities.” 2021. Bristol University/Policy Press, 2021. 
  • D’Hombres, B. and Schnepf, S.V. 2021. “International Mobility of Students in Italy and the UK: Does It Pay off and for Whom?” Higher Education. 82, pp. 1173–1194
  • Jarman, Holly. 2017. “Trade Policy Governance: What Health Policymakers and Advocates Need to Know.” Health Policy. 121(11): 1105-1112.
  • Lynch J. 2020. “Regimes of Inequality: The Political Economy of Health and Wealth.” Cambridge University Press.
  • Myant, Martin. 2020. “European Multinational Companies and Trade Unions in Eastern and East-Central Europe.” European Trade Union Institute. pp. 40.
  • Schnepf, S.V. and Colagrossi, M. 2020. “Is unequal uptake of Erasmus mobility really only due to students' choices? The role of selection into universities and fields of study.” Journal of European Social Policy. 30(4):436-451.

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

Free Movement in the Time of COVID: The Economics and Ethics of Digital Vaccine Passports

As Europe seeks to recover from the impacts of COVID-19, European leaders have implemented digital health passes and vaccine passports. These measures have met comparatively little resistance compared to the U.S., but critics warn of ethical and legal concerns, including data privacy. What does free movement mean in the time of COVID? How might we understand differences in public health policy with regards to vaccine mandates and vaccine passports across Europe and how does that compare to the U.S.?

PANELISTS:
Peter Baldwin
University of California Los Angeles

Ana Beduschi
University of Exeter

Sarah Chan
University of Edinburgh

Alex John London
Carnegie Mellon University

MODERATOR:
Jae-Jae Spoon
University of Pittsburgh

REFERENCES:

  • Ada Lovelace Institute. 2021. “Checkpoints for Vaccine Passports.” European Artificial Intelligence Fund.
  • Baldwin, Peter. 2021. “Fighting the First Wave Contagion and the State Democracy and Disease.” Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Beduschi, Ana. 2021. “Digital Health Passports for COVID-19: Data Privacy and Human Rights Law.” University of Exeter; UKRI Economic and Social Research Council.
  • Beduschi, Ana. 2021. “COVID-19 Health Status Certificates: Policy Recommendations on Data Privacy and Human Rights.” University of Exeter; UKRI Economic and Social Research Council.
  • Chan, Sarah. 2020. “Imagining Life with “Immunity Passports”: Managing Risk during a Pandemic.” Discover Society, Policy Press, pp. 1-4
  • London AJ (2021) For the Common Good: Philosophical Foundations of Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

How and Why Europe (Mis)Understands Black America

Jean Monnet Center Distinguished Lecture - Gary Younge,
Author, broadcaster, and editor-at-large for The Guardian based in London, England and Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester

Europe's views on Black America are informed by a range of contradictory tendencies: amnesia about its own colonial past, ambivalence about its racial present, a tradition of anti-racism and international solidarity and an often fraught geo-political relationship with the United States itself. Europe both resents and covets American power, and is in little position to do anything about it. So African Americans represent to many a redemptive force– living proof that that US is both not all that it claims to be and could be so much greater than it is. This sense of superiority is made possible, in no small part, by a woefully, willfully incomplete and toxically nostalgic understanding of Europe's own history which has left significant room for denial, distortion, ignorance and sophistry. The result, in the post-war era, has been moments of solidarity often impaired by exoticization or infantilization in which Europe has found it easier to export anti-racism across the Atlantic than to practice it at home or export it across the Channel, the Mediterranean and beyond.

COMMENTS:
Felix Germain,
Department of Africana Studies, University of Pittsburgh

Will the Center Hold? What to Expect in the German Federal Election

On the eve of the German Federal Elections, our panel of experts weighed in on the various issues concerning German voters, the legacy of outgoing Chancellor Merkel, the potential impact of this election on the EU and Germany’s relationship with the U.S., and the significance of the Green Party mounting their first ever candidate for the Chancellorship.

PANELISTS:
Kai Arzheimer
University of Mainz

Marcel Lewandowsky
University of Florida

Jae-Jae Spoon
University of Pittsburgh

Jana Puglierin
European Council on Foreign Relations

MODERATOR:
Steve Sokol
American Council on Germany

REFERENCES:

  • Arzheimer K. 2020. “A partial micro-foundation for the ‘two-worlds’ theory of morality policymaking: Evidence from Germany.” Research & Politics.
  • Arzheimer, Kai. 2018. “Conceptual Confusion is not Always a Bad Thing: The Curious Case of European Radical Right Studies.” Demokratie und Entscheidung. Eds. Marker, Karl, Michael Roseneck, Annette Schmitt, and Jürgen Sirsch. Wiesbaden: Springer. 23-40.
  • Lewandowsky, Marcel. 2022. "New parties, populism, and parliamentary polarization. Evidence from plenary debates in the German Bundestag." in: Michael Oswald (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Populism. Palgrave: Basingstok, pp. 611-627
  • Lewandowsky, Marcel. 2019. "Promoting or Controlling Political Decisions? Citizen Preferences for Direct-Democratic Institutions in Germany." German Politics 29 (2): 180-200
  • Puglierin, Jana and Piotr Buras. 2021. “Beyond Merkelism: What Europeans expect of post-election Germany.” European Council on Foreign Relations.

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

Creating Europe Through Creative Europe

In this final session in our Spring series on “Creating Europe through…” our panel of experts will focus on European-level cultural policy and and its impact on local and global cultural sectors. Taking the European Commission’s Creative Europe program as a starting point, including initiatives such as the ECoC, the conversation will explore intersections of policy-making, cultural diplomacy, cultural trade, tourism, and implications for European identity and solidarity. Audience participation is encouraged.

PANELISTS:

Ivan Šarar
City of Rijeka
2020 European Capital of Culture

-       Rijeka Capital of Culture-- https://rijeka2020.eu/en/

-       Website - https://www.rijeka.hr/en/city-government/city-departments/department-of-culture/

Claske Vos
University of Amsterdam

-       Vos, C. (2019). Constructing the European Cultural Space: A Matter of Eurocentrism? In M. Brolsma, R. de Bruin, & M. Lok (Eds.), Eurocentrism in European History and Memory (pp. 223-243). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctvr7f5v5.15

-       Vos, C. (2018). Heritage and Policy. In S. L. López Varela (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences (Vol. 2). Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119188230.saseas0284

Philip Schlesinger
University of Glasgow

-       Schlesinger, Philip.  2017. “The creative economy: invention of a global orthodoxy. “The European Journal of Social Science Research, 30:1, 73-90.

-       Schlesinger, Philip. 2018. “Whither the creative economy? Some reflections on the European case.” CREATE Working Paper 2018/05.

Randall Halle
University of Pittsburgh

-       European Art, Culture, and Politics special issue of EuropeNow (33) 2020 https://www.europenowjournal.org/2020/04/27/introduction-3/

-       The Europeanization of Cinema: Interzones and Imaginative Communities. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2014.

MODERATOR:
Jae-Jae Spoon

University of Pittsburgh

Additonal Resources:

Creative Europe Program-- https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/creative-europe/

 

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

Creating Europe Through Multilingualism

This session is the third of our semester-long "Creating Europe through..." series highlighting different approaches to constructing a common European identity. Our interdisciplinary panel of experts focus on EU language policies and multilingualism within European institutions.

PANELISTS:

Katerina Strani
Heriot-Watt University

-       Pym, A. (2013). “Translation as an Instrument for Multilingual Democracy.” Critical Multilingualism Studies 1:2 (2013): pp. 78-95 -  Translation as an Instrument for Multilingual Democracy | Critical Multilingualism Studies (arizona.edu)

-       Strani, K. (ed. 2020). Multilingualism and Politics: Revisiting Multilingual Citizenship. London: Palgrave Macmillan Multilingualism and Politics - Revisiting Multilingual Citizenship | Katerina Strani | Palgrave Macmillan

-       Podcast: Much Language Such Talk: Katerina Strani on Language and Identity (includes transcript) Episode 10: Dr. Katerina Strani & Language and Identity - Much Language Such Talk (mlstpodcast.com)

Nils Ringe
University of Wisconsin-Madison

-       Wilson, S., N. Ringe, and J. Van Thimme. Policy Leadership and Reelection in the European Parliament. Journal of European Public Policy, 2016.

-       Hage, F. M., and N. Ringe. Rapporteur-Shadow Rapporteur Networks in the European Parliament: The Strength of Small numbers. European Journal of Political Research.

Michele Gazzola
Ulster University

-       Grin, François, Manuel Célio Conceição, Peter A.  Kraus, László Marácz, Žaneta  Ozolina, Nike K. Pokorn, and Anthony Pym (eds.). 2018. The MIME vademecum: Mobility and inclusion in multilingual Europe, Geneva: MIME Project.

-       Gazzola, Michele (2016) Research for Cult Committee - European Strategy for Multilingualism: Benefits and Costs, PE 573.460. Brussels: European Parliament.

Karen McAuliffe
University of Birmingham

-       McAuliffe, K (2017) “Behind the Scenes at the Court of Justice: A Story of Process and People” in Davies and Nicola (eds) EU Law Stories Cambridge University Press

-       McAuliffe, K (2016) “Hidden Translators: The Invisibility of Translators and the Influence of Lawyer-Linguists on the Case Law of the Court of Justice of the European Union” Language and Law/Linguagem e Direito 3(1) 5-29

-       Visit Dr. McAuliffe’s website for more resources: https://www.karenmcauliffe.com

MODERATOR:
Jae-Jae Spoon
University of Pittsburgh

Additional Resources:

For K-12: 

-       https://edl.ecml.at/Teachers/Teachingmaterials/tabid/3097/language/en-GB/Default.aspx

-       https://www.nationalgeographic.org/activity/the-languages-of-europe/

Multilingualism:

-       https://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=EPRS_BRI(2019)642207

-       https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378216610003280

 

The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.

The Battle over Gender Equality in European Politics

In recent years, the EU has adopted far-reaching legislation and policies to support LGBTIQ and women's rights across a broad range of issues from the gender pay-gap through accession to the  Istanbul Convention on violence against women to gender equality in culture and foreign affairs, biodiversity, and digital policy. Yet, several member states have resisted such transnational efforts and have not only removed the word "gender" from official documents and eliminated the field of gender studies in higher education but also rolled back gender rights within their boundaries, sparking sustained protests most notably in Poland and Hungary.

MODERATOR:
Muge Kokten Finkel
Assistant Professor, GSPIA
University of Pittsburgh

SPEAKERS:
Laura Albu
Vice President, European Women's Lobby

Lenka Bustikova
Associate Professor, Political Science
Arizona State University

Malgorzata Fidelis
Associate Professor, History
University of Illinois, Chicago

Alice Kuhnke
MEP, European Parliament
Vice Chair, Group of Greens/European Free Alliance

Europe's Green Recovery

The European Green Deal is the EU's ambitious new growth strategy that aims to transform Europe into a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy where no person and no place is left behind. As Executive Vice-President, Frans Timmermans leads the European Commission's work on the European Green Deal and its first European Climate Law to enshrine a 2050 climate-neutrality target into EU law.

Creating Europe Through the Built Environment

In this second installment of our 'Creating Europe through' series, the focus is on the built environment. Our panelists discuss: How does the architecture of EU institutional buildings reflector express European ideas or identity? Does EU funding for infrastructure projects throughout Europe promote a European identity among EU citizens? And how does the EU work to integrate buildings into the circular economy and create a greener Europe?

PANELISTS:

  • Carola Hein
    Delft University of Technology

Laconte, Pierre, and Carola Hein (eds.) (2007): Brussels: Perspectives on a European Capital. Brussels: Publication of the Foundation for the Urban Environment. 130pp. 

Hein, Carola (ed.) (2019) Adaptive Strategies for Water Heritage, Springer. 

  • Elma Durmisevic
    4D Architects

Brouwer, J., & Durmisevic, E. (2002). TOWARDS DYNAMIC BUILDING STRUCTURES -BUILDING WITH SYSTEMS. https://www.4darchitects.nl/download/Beyond_Sustainability_2002.pdf

For more projects and publications visit www.4darchitects.nl/4d_profile.htm

  • John Bachtler
    University of Strathclyde

Bachtler, J., & Mendez, C. (2020). Cohesion and the EU's budget: is conditionality undermining solidarity? . In R. Coman, A. Crespy, & V. A. Schmidt (Eds.), Governance and politics in the post-criss European Union (pp. 121-139). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108612609.009

Bachtler, J. (2019). Three decades of thought leadership and policy influence in regional development. In A. Olechnicka, & M. Herbst (Eds.), Równosc czy efektywnosc rozwoju: Eseje inspirowane dorobkiem naukowym Grzegorza Gorzelaka (pp. 27-38).

MODERATOR:

  • Christopher Drew Armstrong
    University of Pittsburgh

          “The Architect as Revolutionary Hero: A Monument to Julien-David Leroy.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 66 (September 2007), 316-339.

          Review of Frank Salmon’s Building on Ruins. The Rediscovery of Rome and English Architecture (London: Ashgate, 2000) in: Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 61 (June 2002): 222–224.

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The series is intended to present a broad range of views and opinions about topics relevant to Europe. The views expressed are those of the presenters and cannot be taken to represent the views or opinions of the U.S. Government nor the European Union.

We would appreciate your feedback on these videos and the Conversations on Europe series.  Please see our survey at: https://pitt.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x5l0NHN4btbAQR

For more resources and readings related to this session or any of our past sessions, go to:  https://www.ucis.pitt.edu/esc/events/coe

This video has been funded with the assistance of both the European Commission (through the Erasmus + Programme) and the US Department of Education. The contents of this video are the sole responsibility of the European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the U.S. government or the European Union.

Co-support provided by the International Foreign Language Education office of the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission's Erasmus + Programme. Views and opinions expressed are those of the individual panelists and do not reflect the views or opinions of the U.S. Government or the European Union.