Teacher Programs

Chasing Leviathan: The Environmental, Social and Economic Impacts of Whaling

 

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Chasing Leviathan:

The Environmental, Social and Economic Impacts of Whaling

 

Friday, February 28, 2020

5:30-8:30 p.m.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

8:30 a.m. (registration and breakfast) to 4:00 p.m.

 

Join us for this FREE professional development mini course on the world of Whaling from New England to Europe to Japan. Speakers will address topics such the lives of sailors, what parts of a whale and what kinds of whales were harvested, the global commodity chain of whaling, the background to the history of whaling in Japan, and a challenge to the contemporary Japanese narrative about the importance of whaling to Japan. Class time will also include a presentation on the early use of black and white documentary film in conjunction with the American Experience documentary Into the Deep, and a curriculum session with a master teacher. Free ACT 48 hours, materials, parking, and meals, including a copy of Into the Deep. Space limited so please register by Monday, February 24, 2020.

View our flyer here

View the Exciting Schedule of Events Here

 

To register: https://forms.gle/7X6sHr4jsin66Gif7

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About Teacher Programs

NCTA provides content rich professional development programs for K-12 educators and pre-service teachers in all fields. This includes face-to-face college level seminars, online courses, workshops, book groups, webinars, and among other opportunities. Below are current offerings both locally and nationwide:

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University of Washington NCTA 2020 Summer Institute in Seattle, WA: 20th and 21st Centuries East Asian Legacies and Futures

20th and 21st Centuries East Asian Legacies and Futures

University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Monday, July 13 to Friday, July 17, 2020.

Description

20th and 21st Centuries East Asian Legacies and Futures will explore the events of this time from the perspective of artists and writers of China, Korea, and Japan. Throughout this period of upheaval and moments of relative peace, producers of culture have been employed, mobilized, and inspired to communicate the ever-changing political, economic, and social landscape of East Asia. This summer program will focus on the cultural, social, and political histories of East Asia as told by visual and literary artists of the past and present. We will examine primary and secondary source documents, while also discussing how to incorporate related curricula into your classroom.

Course material will include primary and secondary source materials, art historical approaches, in addition to resources for inclusion in the classroom. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is required.

This seminar is sponsored by the East Asia Resource Center (EARC), University of Washington, in conjunction with the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA).

Program Benefits

Aside from the registration and housing fees ($250 total), this seminar is offered free of charge thanks to the Freeman Foundation NCTA grant to the East Asia Resource Center. Seminar benefits include:

  • 40 Washington State OSPI clock hours (free) OR two 400-level UW credits for a fee of approximately $230
  • A certificate of completion
  • All course materials provided
  • $100 for the purchase of additional teaching materials
  • A one-year subscription to Education about Asia
  • Morning snacks and lunches
  • Dormitory housing, meals, and partial travel stipends of up to $300 for a limited number of out-of-town participants

Application

You can apply to this program here. The priority deadline is March 31, 2020.

Leader

Melanie King.

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University of Washington NCTA 2020 Summer Institute in Anchorage, AK : A Visual and Historical Introduction to East Asian Belief Systems

A Visual and Historical Introduction to East Asian Belief Systems

 University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK.

Monday, June 29 to Thursday, July 2, 2020

Description

A Visual and Historical Introduction to East Asian Belief Systems will explore the key philosophical and religious traditions which occupy important places in East Asian culture both historically and presently. Our course of study will focus on the emergence of Daoism and Confucianism in China, Korean and Japanese indigenous beliefs, and the spread of Buddhism through all three. We shall examine how these traditions have evolved as they moved across space and time through study of literary sources, art, objects and places of worship. In addition, considerable time will be devoted to discussion of how to incorporate curriculum resources into your classroom pedagogy.

Course material will include primary and secondary source materials, art historical approaches, in addition to resources for inclusion in the classroom. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is required.

This seminar is sponsored by the East Asia Resource Center (EARC), University of Washington, in conjunction with the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA).

Program Benefits

Aside from the registration and housing fees ($250 total), this seminar is offered free of charge thanks to the Freeman Foundation NCTA grant to the East Asia Resource Center. Seminar benefits include:

  • A certificate of completion
  • All course materials provided
  • $100 for the purchase of additional teaching materials
  • A one-year subscription to Education about Asia
  • Morning snacks and lunches
  • Dormitory housing, meals, and partial travel stipends of up to $300 for a limited number of out-of-town participants

Application

You can apply to this program here. The priority deadline is March 15, 2020. Decisions will be communicated on April 6, 2020.

Leaders

Paul DunscombMelanie King, and Mischell Anderson.

 

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Five Colleges Center NCTA Summer Institute: Ties that Bind the U.S. and East Asia: Boston

Image by Aurore Duwez from Pixabay

FCCEAS NCTA Summer Institute
Ties that Bind the U.S. and East Asia: Boston
July 29-August 2, 2020
Cambridge, MA

Connections between East Asia and the U.S. began with whalers and traders in the colonial era and continue until today. The greater Boston area offers the opportunity to delve deep into these connections which are documented through images, narratives and resources in the FCCEAS Ties that Bind project. In this FCCEAS NCTA summer residential workshop, participants will explore these links through visits to Chinatown, the Museum of Fine Arts, Salem, and more. Participants will also learn how to use these connections in their classrooms, and discover how to contribute to the project.

Project developers Karl Neumann (Dana Hall School, Wellesley, MA) and Anne Prescott (FCCEAS Director) will guide the learning activities. Teachers will be invited to return to their communities and research people, places and events to add to the Ties that Bind project, and will be eligible for stipends for that work. 

Twelve K-12 in-service teachers will be accepted for this program, with preference given to World and U.S. history teachers. Participants will receive 4 nights accommodation in double rooms at the Kendall Hotel in Cambridge, meals from breakfast on Thursday through breakfast on Sunday, local public transportation, hotel parking, and admissions to museums. A limited number of travel grants to cover partial transportation costs will be available to teachers from outside New England. 

Application deadline: April 26, 2020. Successful applicants will be notified no later than May 4, 2020. 

Questions? E-mail aprescott@fivecolleges.edu

Applicationhttps://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcceas/Boston-summer-2020

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Michigan State University Summer Seminar: Teaching Traditional East Asia

June 15-19, 2020

Michigan State University

APPLY BY: March 31, 2020.

APPLY NOW for this content-rich seminar for K-12 educators. Designed as an introduction to the premodern histories and cultures of CHINA, JAPAN, and KOREA, the course will encourage and facilitate teaching and learning about East Asia in Geography, History, Social Studies, and World Literature. Media specialists, librarians, art teachers, and world language teachers are also encouraged to apply. There will be special emphasis on pedagogy, bestpractices, classroom applications, and resources.

 

This seminar will provide you with valuable content and resources to implement the study of East Asia into your curriculum in keeping with your state’s academic standards as well as geography and world history standards. No previous background in Asia is assumed. Teams of teachers as well as teachers in schools with NCTA alumni are strongly encouraged to apply.

 

Apply online here: https://forms.gle/57Asud6Hff5yT793A

 

SEMINAR DATES: June 15-19, 2020,

with one six-hour follow-up session in the fall.

 

BENEFITS: Teachers who attend all classes and

complete all requirements will receive:

- $200 stipend and certificate of completion

- $200 in teaching materials, inclu. a free textbook and year’s subscription to Education About Asia

- 30 SCECH hours (for Michigan teachers)

- Status as National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) alumni. Alumni status gives you eligibility to participate in a variety of NCTA programs and study tours.

 

QUESTIONS? Email us:

Adam Coldren coldrend@msu.edu

Ethan Segal segale@msu.edu

Kyle Greenwalt greenwlt@msu.edu

 

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Making Green Tea for America - and for Japan

Friday, February 21, 2020

4130 Posvar Hall University of Pittsburgh

3:00 pm

Join Professor Robert Hellyer of Wake Forest University for a discussion on the socio-economic history of green tea in America and Japan in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Soon after the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Japan dramatically expanded tea production—especially of high-quality sencha green tea—specifically to meet demand from the United States, then a green tea consuming nation. This presentation will outline that export trade highlighting how tea production helped to ease social tensions in the nascent Japanese nation-state by providing employment for Tokugawa retainers who had opposed the new central regime during the Boshin War (1868-1869).  It will also explain the ways in which a change in American tastes—the 1920s’ embrace of black teas produced in South Asia—brought a decline in Japanese tea exports to the United States. Facing a glut, Japanese tea merchants aggressively marketed sencha at home for the first time, emphasizing its health benefits. As a result, more Japanese began to consume sencha, setting in motion a trend that made that type of green tea the definitive daily beverage it remains today.

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Asian Studies Center, University Center for East Asian Studies

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Remembering America's Twentieth-Century Asian Wars

Elizabethtown College Face-to-Face Book Group

March 3, March 12, April 4, April 18

As we reflect on the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, we are once again reminded of the importance of commemorations, monuments, and public memory.  Come join Dr. David Kenley, Elizabethtown College, and Michele Beauchamp, NCTA Alumna, for a fascinating book series on America’s twentieth-century wars in Asia.  Rather than learning about the events of those wars, we will focus instead on the ways in which the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Americans choose to remember, commemorate, and celebrate these horrific events.  At the conclusion of the series, we will participate in a field trip to Washington to critically read some of our nation’s war memorials.  Participants can join all three book clubs as well as the field trip, or they can selectively choose those that best fit their schedule and teaching interests.  Dinner will be included for each scheduled meeting.

Times and dates: 

March 3, 6:00 pm:  Karen Stelson,  Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor's Story

This striking work of narrative nonfiction tells the true story of six-year-old Sachiko Yasui's survival of the Nagasaki atomic bomb on August 9, 1945, and the heartbreaking and lifelong aftermath. Having conducted extensive interviews with Sachiko Yasui, Caren Stelson chronicles Sachiko’s trauma and loss as well as her long journey to find peace. This book offers readers a remarkable new perspective on the final moments of World War II and their aftermath.

March 12, 6:00 pm:  Ha Jin, War Trash

Ha Jin’s masterful new novel casts a searchlight into a forgotten corner of modern history, the experience of Chinese soldiers held in U.S. POW camps during the Korean War. In 1951 Yu Yuan, a scholarly and self-effacing clerical officer in Mao’s “volunteer” army, is taken prisoner south of the 38th Parallel. Because he speaks English, he soon becomes an intermediary between his compatriots and their American captors.With Yuan as guide, we are ushered into the secret world behind the barbed wire, a world where kindness alternates with blinding cruelty and one has infinitely more to fear from one’s fellow prisoners than from the guards. Vivid in its historical detail, profound in its imaginative empathy, War Trash is Ha Jin’s most ambitious book to date.

April 4, 11:00 am:  Elizabeth Son, Embodied Reckonings

Embodied Reckonings examines the political and cultural aspects of contemporary performances that have grappled with the history of the “comfort women,” the Japanese military’s euphemism for the sexual enslavement of girls and young women—mostly Korean—in the years before and during World War II. Long silent, in the early 1990s these women and their supporters initiated varied performance practices—protests, tribunals, theater, and memorial-building projects—to demand justice for those affected by state-sponsored acts of violence. The book provides a critical framework for understanding how actions designed to bring about redress can move from the political and legal aspects of this concept to its cultural and social possibilities.

April 18, all day:  Field trip to Washington D.C. to visit Washington Monuments and (possible) visit to Freer/Sackler Gallery. Participants wishing to join the free field trip must attend at least one book group.

 

To register, please click the link here: https://forms.gle/iauuEx9hczMTLUHb9

Registration is required.

Please register at least two weeks before the date of each book group session so that you will have time to read before attending.

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East Asian Popular Culture

 

Saturday, March 14, 2020

9:00 AM-3:00 PM

Knutti Hall, Room 205; 102 East High Street; Shepherd University; Shepherdstown, WV 25443

East Asian popular culture is a fascinating window into the lives and feelings of contemporary Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans.  As such, it helps American students connect with East Asians on a visceral level going beyond history and traditional practices.  This program features three speakers:  Professor Seung-Hwan Shin (University of Pittsburgh) will speak on Korean Cinema and the Korean Wave, while Professor Gordon (Shepherd University) will present the life of Taiwanese pop singer Teresa Teng, and Professor Rachael Hutchinson (University of Delaware) will discuss Japanese videogames.  The program will also feature an examination of how East Asian pop culture can be deployed in school classrooms to best effect.

 

To learn more, please view our informational flier here.

Visit our link to register: https://forms.gle/H1Mowom7rofEwCWA9

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Ties That Bind: Connecting the U.S. and East Asia

 

Currently, the workshop is full. We are sorry for any inconvenience, but you can still use the form below to be added to the waitlist.

A FREE professional development workshop for K-12 Educators

Saturday, March 14, 2020

Minneapolis Institute of Art

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 

Ties That Bind: Mapping U.S.-East Asia Connections is an innovative collaborative digital mapping project which allows teachers and students to experience the people, places and events which connect the United States and China, Japan and Korea. Participants will learn about the project before exploring ties between Minnesota and East Asia. Classroom implementation strategies, including the use of primary source documents, will also be discussed.

Speakers include: Dr. Anne Prescott, Director of the Five College Center for East Asian Studies, Northampton, MA; Mr. Wing Young Huie, photographer and author; Alyssa Machida, Asian Art Learning Resources Fellow, Minneapolis Institute of Art. Welcome by Dr. Richard Bohr, longtime NCTA seminar leader in Minnesota.

For more information, please view our flier here.

Currently, the workshop is full. We are sorry for any inconvenience, but you can still use the form below to be added to the waitlist.

Free parking and lunch

Registration required. Registration deadline: Monday, March 9, 2020.

To register:  https://forms.gle/qbohS77Aodyp6roY7

Co-sponsored by the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Minneapolis Institute of Art

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University of Colorado Boulder Summer Institute: Considering Early Modern East Asia Through Maritime History

Applications now available for the TEA-NCTA 2020 Summer Institute, Considering Early Modern East Asia through Maritime History. July 5-9, 2020. University of Colorado Boulder.

From the 14th to 19th centuries, the sea closely linked countries of East Asia as they engaged in rich economic, diplomatic, and cultural exchange and war. Using the lens of maritime history, this institute offers secondary social studies teachers an opportunity to work with scholars and specialists to re-center historical studies of early modern East Asia from national histories of China, Japan, and Korea to narratives focusing on the sea-based, transborder people, institutions, and practices that connected the region. In this four-day institute, teachers will gain an understanding of the political, economic, and cultural systems of the early modern East Asian world and reconsider narratives of encounters and conflicts with European imperialist powers.

The institute will be held on the CU Boulder campus and application is open to secondary social studies teachers nationwide.

Teachers selected for the programs will receive a travel stipend, room and board, and resource materials.  

For more details and to apply, see detailed flyer and application.

Application deadline is March 16, 2020.

For questions, contact catherine.ishida@colorado.edu, 303.735.5115.

This program is made possible through generous funding from the Freeman Foundation to NCTA at the Program for Teaching East Asia, University of Colorado.

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Contemporary Japan in a Global Context

 

A mini course for NCTA Alumni 2020

Saturday, February 22 and
Saturday February 29, 2020
9am-4pm at the University of Pennsylvania
 
This mini course will feature the following topics:
  • · Japan in Asia; Japan in the World
  • · On the eve of the Olympics: Sports and the environment in Japan
  • · Gender and Japanese Society
  • · Film, anime and manga
  • · Robots and Japanese Culture
  • · Making Japanese Food Global

 

The mini course is limited to 25 participants. Open to alumni in the Philadelphia/Eastern Pennsylvania area. Priority will be given to applicants who have completed an NCTA seminar. 
Refreshments, lunches and materials will be provided. Act 48 hours available. 
Applicants are encouraged to commit to both sessions 
 
Register online at: https://ceas.sas.upenn.edu/
 
 
Supported by the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia (NCTA) through the University of Pittsburgh national coordinating site, and the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for East Asian Studies and Penn Museum
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A Samurai and A Gentleman: Representations of Power and Knowledge in East Asia

 

February 8, 2020

10:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Location: Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan

Type of Course: Face-to-Face Seminar or Workshop

Audience: K-12 Educators

Course Description: This free workshop will provide middle and high school social studies, language arts, and visual arts educators with an opportunity to discover new ways of incorporating the cultures of East Asia into their curriculum.

By participating in this workshop teachers will:

  • Better understand the changing role of samurai and scholars in East Asian culture, most especially in Tokugawa and Meiji Japan
  • Articulate differences between various representations of samurai and scholars by learning to identify key characteristics in a variety of artistic works
  • Learn to integrate images into a variety of critical-thinking activities as a means of facilitating more productive class investigations and museum tours
  • Learn to use specific museum objects to engage students in close looking and descriptive writing activities

Registration and Info: https://www.dia.org/events/samurai-and-gentleman-representations-power-and-knowledge-east-asia

Offered to: Michigan and Ohio

 

Sponsored by the Freeman Foundation & National Consortium of Teaching About Asia.

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University of Colorado Boulder: NCTA-TEA NoVa Workshop 2019-2020 Series

NCTA NoVa workshops are offered to secondary teachers in Virginia and the DC area who teach abour East Asia as part of their course assignments. NCTA NoVa workshops run from 9:00am (arrival/check in from 8:30-8:50am) to 3:45pm and include morning snacks and lunch. The workshops take place at the Madeira School in McLean, VA unless otherwise noted. NCTA will contact you to confirm your participation.

February 29, 2020. NoVa NCTA at the Freer|Sackler. NCTA joins our colleagues at the Freer|Sackler to focus on two of the Galleries’ 2020 special exhibits. “Hokusai: Mad about Painting” provides a vivid, complex look into everyday life in early 19th-century Japan by one of Japan’s most famous Tokugawa woodblock artists. With the second featured exhibit, “Sacred Dedication: A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece,” workshop participants have the opportunity to explore a single work of art in depth and detail. We’ll work with Freer|Sackler curators and staff, and also consider ways to teach Japan and Korea through these works. Registration for this workshop opens in mid-January 2020.

March 7, 2020. Japan, Popular Culture, and the Olympics. The Olympics are generally recognized as a world stage on which the hosting nation can showcase its culture, accomplishments, and global role. For Japan, the summer 2020 Tokyo Olympics will take place in a time of growing nationalism, increasing regional friction, and an uncertain economy.  What messages will Japan send to the world through the 2020 Olympics? Will it showcase trade-mark soft power accomplishments in technology and popular culture, as in the past, or promote a new image for the 21st century? Our featured speaker is William Tsutsui, author of In Godzilla’s Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture on the Global StageJapanese Popular Culture and Globalization; and The East Asian Olympiads, 1934-2008. Registration for this workshop opens in mid-January 2020.

For more information about the NCTA-TEA NoVa Workshop Series, please view the flyer here.

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Five Colleges Center for East Asian Studies 2019-2020 Webinars

Join the NCTA and the Five Colleges Center for East Asian Studies for their 2019-2020 Series of Webinars. 

Engage with experts and educators in thoughtful discussions and engaging presentations on the topics below.

To learn more, please click this link.

 

Democracy in Taiwan

Feb. 19, 2020, 7-8pm Eastern Time

Join Professor Sara Newland in understanding Democray in Taiwan.

Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4325439564888608002

 

 

Being Taiwanese: What's in a Name?

Feb. 26, 2020, 7-8pm Eastern Time

Dr. Catherine Chou, Grinnell College

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/821332291930394115

 

 

Teaching Taiwan

March 11, 2020, 7-8pm Eastern Time

Join Professor James Lin as he dicusses teaching about Taiwan in turbulant times.

 
 
 
 

China's Three Teachings: Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism

Mar. 25, 2020, 7-8pm Eastern Time

Dr. Jeffrey Richey, Berea College

Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/329441576040942603

 

 

Magic Ramen: The Story of Momofuku Ando

Apr. 7, 2020, 7-8pm Eastern time

Author Andrea Wang. Presented in collaboration with the University of Colorado Program for Teaching East Asia.

Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8009244423049219595

 

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