Online Mini Course

Understanding Contemporary China: Perspectives from the Periphery - Online NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators

 

Monday, June 20, 2022 & Tuesday, June 21, 2022

9:00am - 3:00pm (Eastern Time)
 
Offered to Educators in: Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia 
 
This is a free two-day online (via Zoom) mini-course organized by the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, under the auspices of University of Pittsburgh regional NCTA site. The program is open to K-12 educators in Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. It will include presentations by scholars on politics, international relations, education, arts and culture toward helping us understand contemporary China vis-a-vis Taiwan, Hong Kong, Inner Mongolia and Yunnan.
 
Participants who attend both sessions in full will receive Certificates of Completion; Pennsylvania teachers will also receive Act 48 hours. Participants will also receive complimentary teaching/reading materials. Participants must attend both sessions to receive these materials.  
 
To register, please visit this link: https://forms.gle/2UZauJZPEKDwgQo58
 
 

 Schedule for this Mini-Course

 

Day 1 of the mini-course will introduce China in the Age of Xi Jinping, followed by presentations on Taiwan, Hong Kong and Inner Mongolia. 

Day 2 of the mini-course will focus on ethnic minorities in China, and arts and culture components. 

 

Mini-course organizers are Penn seminar leaders, David Dettman, Margaret Lonzetta and Lesley Solomon. 

 

Speakers include:

 

David Kenley, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Dakota State Univ. 

 

Jacques deLisle, Professor of Law, Dep. Director, Center for Study of Contemporary China, University of Pennsylvania  

 

Christopher Atwood, Professor of Mongolian and Late Imperial, Early Modern Chinese History, University of Pennsylvania 

 

Rebecca Clothey, Associate Professor, School of Education, Drexel University  

 

Colette Fu, Philadelphia-based photographer, book artist and paper engineer who works on minority group issues from Yunnan 

 

 

Understanding Contemporary China: Perspectives from the Periphery - Online NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators
Monday, June 20, 2022 - 09:00 to Tuesday, June 21, 2022 - 15:00
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Understanding Contemporary China: Perspectives from the Periphery - Online NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators

 

Monday, June 20, 2022 & Tuesday, June 21, 2022

9:00am - 3:00pm (Eastern Time)
 
Offered to Educators in: Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia 
 
This is a free two-day online (via Zoom) mini-course organized by the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, under the auspices of University of Pittsburgh regional NCTA site. The program is open to K-12 educators in Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. It will include presentations by scholars on politics, international relations, education, arts and culture toward helping us understand contemporary China vis-a-vis Taiwan, Hong Kong, Inner Mongolia and Yunnan.
 
Participants who attend both sessions in full will receive Certificates of Completion; Pennsylvania teachers will also receive Act 48 hours. Participants will also receive complimentary teaching/reading materials. Participants must attend both sessions to receive these materials.  
 
To register, please visit this link: https://forms.gle/2UZauJZPEKDwgQo58
 
 

 Schedule for this Mini-Course

 

Day 1 of the mini-course will introduce China in the Age of Xi Jinping, followed by presentations on Taiwan, Hong Kong and Inner Mongolia. 

Day 2 of the mini-course will focus on ethnic minorities in China, and arts and culture components. 

 

Mini-course organizers are Penn seminar leaders, David Dettman, Margaret Lonzetta and Lesley Solomon. 

 

Speakers include:

 

David Kenley, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Dakota State Univ. 

 

Jacques deLisle, Professor of Law, Dep. Director, Center for Study of Contemporary China, University of Pennsylvania  

 

Christopher Atwood, Professor of Mongolian and Late Imperial, Early Modern Chinese History, University of Pennsylvania 

 

Rebecca Clothey, Associate Professor, School of Education, Drexel University  

 

Colette Fu, Philadelphia-based photographer, book artist and paper engineer who works on minority group issues from Yunnan 

 

Event/Opportunity Type: 

A Dance of Letters: How East Asian Writing Systems Work: NCTA Shepherd Mini-Course

 

A Dance of Letters: How East Asian Writing Systems Work

NCTA Mini-Course

Saturday, May 14 & Saturday, May 21, 2022

1:00pm - 4:00pm (Eastern Time)

Online via Zoom

 

Join scholars and language experts for this six-contact-hour mini-course spread over two Saturday afternoons (May 14 and 21) that examines the writing systems used by speakers of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. First, we will study how Chinese characters express both meanings and sounds. Next, the course will explore how Korea’s writing system combines Chinese characters with an alphabet called hangeul that shows the physical mouth positions for different sounds. Finally, we will look at how Japanese uses Chinese characters together with two phonetic syllabaries to transmit various kinds of information about Japanese words. The mini-course will include discussions and exercises regarding how elements of these systems can be taught in various K-12 classrooms, including classes focused on history, culture, geography, and/or science. Participants will receive a set of calligraphy materials in advance of the program. A complementary book will be sent to participants who attend both sessions. Registration limited. 

All participants will receive a calligraphy set for hands-on practice in advance of the course. Participants who attend both classes in their entirety will receive the book Kingdom of Characters: The Language Revolution That Made China Modern by Jing Tsu. 

PA teachers who complete both classes will receive 6 hours of Act 48. 

West Virginia teachers who register with Shepherd University and complete both classes will receive 3 hours of EDPD credit. 

Open to educators from Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

To register, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/5rPtMrVdiXdAKTKZ7

 

Presenters: 

Dr. David Gordon is Professor of History at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. His teaching and research covers Modern East Asia, Japan, China, and Asian intellectual history. This Fall, he will take a sabbatical break to compare two works of late 19th-century satirical literature:  one Japanese and one from Yiddish-speaking Eastern Europe. He also serves as a NCTA seminar leader for the Shepherd University site. 

Dr. Jason Allen is Assistant Professor in the School of Education at Shepherd University. He has presented at educational conferences on topics such as Teaching Religion in the Social Studies Classroom and Using the Arts in the Classroom. He also serves as a NCTA seminar leader for the Shepherd University site. 

Dr. Mi-Hyun Kim is Lecturer II of Korean Language and Linguistics and Korean Program Coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a linguist by training and specializes in language pedagogy and concentrating and phonology and phonetics in Korean linguistics. 

Dr. Haixia Wang is the Program Coordinator for Languages Across the Curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh and China Curriculum Developer & Program Initiatives for the Pitt NCTA. She is a regular presenter on the Chinese language and teaches Chinese at the post-secondary level.

 
A Dance of Letters: How East Asian Writing Systems Work: NCTA Shepherd Mini-Course
Saturday, May 14, 2022 - 13:00 to Saturday, May 21, 2022 - 16:00
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Japanese Women at War and Peace: Gender on the Homefront and Occupied Japan

 

Saturday, March 12; Saturday, March 19; and Saturday, April 2, 2022

10:00am - 12:00pm (noon) Eastern Time

When it comes to Japan’s World War II period, there is no dearth of resource material covering military campaigns, imperial policy, or “MacArthur’s Occupation—but what were Japanese women doing in those three decades? Join Dr. Julie Oakes for a six hour online mini-course that will take a look at how Japanese women navigated the home front while their husbands and sons were off to war. What did they do to maintain their families? How did they contribute to the imperial cause? The first two sessions will focus on these domestic efforts by analyzing material culture, first-hand accounts, and critical secondary sources. The final class will center on the early days of the Occupation, informed by a close read of Goto Yumi’s Those Days in Muramatsu: One Woman’s Memoir of Occupied Japan, as well as discussion gendered policies in the Japanese Constitution and beyond. By the end of this course, participants will have a greater understanding of the ways in which women participated in both war and peace alongside their male counterparts. 

  

Registration limited. For more information and to register: https://forms.gle/73mUcaHXcCeVzBqh7 

  

Participating K-12 educators will receive a complimentary copy of the book Those Days in Muramatsu: One Woman’s Memoir of Occupied Japan. Educators who complete all six hours of the program will receive a Certificate Completion; Pennsylvania teachers will receive six Act 48 hours.

 

Dr. Julie Oakes is a historian of Japan and serves as the Assistant Director of Curriculum and Retention in the Honors College at the University of Maryland Baltimore Country. She a former high school teacher of American history and Japanese history, and a regular seminar leader for the University of Pittsburgh NCTA region.

 
Japanese Women at War and Peace: Gender on the Homefront and Occupied Japan
Saturday, March 12, 2022 - 10:00
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Racial and Social Justice in East & Southeast Asia

 

August 4 & 11, 2021

7:00pm - 10:15pm (Eastern Time)

Learn critical background content on racial and social justice issues in the news headlines from East and Southeast Asia. Topics will include the treatment of racial minorities and indigenous peoples, feminism and the Me Too! movement, religious and political issues, and more. 

 

Engage in comparative discussions of the ways that minorities in China and Japan and womenin South Korea have responded to discrimination with the ways that minorities and women have addressed similar challenges in the United States.

 

Discuss pedagogical strategies, resources, and innovative approaches to teaching this material in middle school and high school classrooms with fellow teachers from across the country as well as with scholars who are experts in their fields.

To register, please apply at bit.ly/2VFMKXV

 

Mini-Course Schedule
 
August 4th
 
Roderick Wilson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Japan and the Myth of Racial Homogeneity
 
Anat Schwartz, University of California, Irvine
Feminism, K-Pop, and the #Me Too Movement in South Korea
 
Will Womack, University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Rohingya and Political Protests in Myanmar
 
 
 
August 11th
 
 
Catherine Ryu, Michigan State University
Sexual Minorities in Contemporary Japan: Designing a Learning Module of Media Representations of Transgender People
 
Benno Weiner, Carnegie Mellon University
Fifty-five Plus One: Ethnic Minorities and the Afterlives of Empire in China
 
Ethan Segal, Michigan State University
Asia and Anti-Asian Hate Crimes in the United States
 
 

Space is limited. Program will be conducted via Zoom; link provided toaccepted applicants.

 

All K-12 Educators will receive Certificates of Completion for attending the entire program. Pennsylvania educators will receive Act 48 hours. Michigan educators will receive SCECH hours. 

The first 30 registered, accepted educators who complete the full six-hour course may receive a $10 Amazon gift card.

 

To register, please apply at bit.ly/2VFMKXV

 

 

Racial and Social Justice in East & Southeast Asia
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 19:00
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Roads and Rivers: Moving through History in China and Japan with Interactive GIS: NCTA Interactive Mini-Course

Saturday, May 8, 2021 & Saturday May 22, 2021

9:30am - 12:30pm (EASTERN TIME) / 8:30am - 11:30am (Central Time)
 
Join Dr. William Womack and historian Dr. James Brown for a master class in teaching Chinese and Japanese culture and history using Google Earth. Take a virtual tour of China's Yangtze Valley and the great roads of Japan. Follow historical events through the landscape using images, pathways, shapes, and text annotations. Learn to develop your own projects in Google Earth for lectures, videos, and interactive online projects for virtual and in-person learning.  
 
Dr. Brown is professor of history, emeritus at Samford University. He is the author of Fairy TalesPatriotism and the Nation State: The Rise of the Modern West and the Response of the World, a pioneering textbook that showcases GIS-based pedagogy. 
 
Offered to: Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia  
 
Complimentary teaching materials will be sent to educators who register for and attend the entire two hour program. All K-12 Educators will receive Certificates of Completion for attending the entire program. Pennsylvania educators will receive Act 48 hours.
 
This mini-course will be conducted through Zoom (once we receive your registration, we will email you the Zoom link for the program)
 
To register for this program, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/aZ1caxDifpyQ5CCw8
 
Roads and Rivers: Moving through History in China and Japan with Interactive GIS: NCTA Interactive Mini-Course
Saturday, May 8, 2021 - 09:30 to 12:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 3

February 8, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)
 
 
Significant portions of the world’s population lack access to sufficient quantities of water or to water of adequate quality – standards enshrined in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This unfolding global water crisis is making life precarious for billions of people and will increasingly foment environmental conflict, spur transnational migration, strain ecological systems, and exacerbate existing inequalities around the planet. 
 
This free, cross-disciplinary mini-course for K-12 educators will explore the global water crisis through attention to its geo-political, cultural, economic, and technological aspects, with particular attention to scholars and practitioners working within the environmental, political, and technological framework to address these challenges using a people-centered approach. Special attention will be given to the case of East Asia.
 
To register, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/CG3ZGrZvWfuMNU8DA
 
Day 3 Speakers

 

Friday, February 12, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)

 

Water, Energy, and Sustainability: A Look at the Mekong 

with Dr. Brian Eyler

This talk will provide an overview of water-energy-food nexus challenges in the Mekong Basin with a focus on hydropower impacts to downstream portions in Cambodia and Vietnam. It will highlight the robust ecological systems of the Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia and the Mekong Delta in Vietnam and use visualizations and data to show how upstream dams are impacting these ecological systems from which 60 million people derive resources. Additionally, it will highlight some of the Stimson Center's work on improving transparency around dams and dam operations in the region and show some tools that your students can use to better understand what's happening in the Mekong.

 

Brian Eyler is an expert on transboundary issues in the Mekong region and specializes in China’s economic cooperation with Southeast Asia. He spent more than 15 years living and working in China and over the last two decades has conducted extensive research with stakeholders in the Mekong region. He is widely recognized as a leading voice on environmental, energy, and water security issues in the Mekong. Brian is co-lead on the Mekong Dam Monitor project and serves as chair of the Stimson Center’s War Legacy Working Group. His first book, Last Days of the Mighty Mekong, was published by Zed Books in 2019. Before coming to the Stimson Center, he served as the Director of the IES Kunming Center at Yunnan University and as a consultant to the UNDP Lancang-Mekong Economic Cooperation program in Kunming, Yunnan province. He holds a MA from the University of California, San Diego and a BA from Bucknell University.  

 

 

Teaching about Modern Water Issues Teacher-led Curriculum Session 

with Cindy McNulty

 

Ms. Cindy McNulty received both her B.S. Ed and Master of Liberal Studies from Duquesne University and has completed additional graduate work at both Duquesne and at Pitt. She has been awarded two National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships, three Fulbright-Hays Fellowships, two All-Star Educator awards and the World Affairs Council's George C. Oehmler Award. Ms. McNulty is active with the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and works with the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh on their Teacher Advisory Board and the Global Scholars selection committee. Ms. McNulty also served as Oakland Catholic's Director of the Global Competence Initiative.

 

 

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 3
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 17:30 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 2

 

February 8, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)
 
 
Significant portions of the world’s population lack access to sufficient quantities of water or to water of adequate quality – standards enshrined in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This unfolding global water crisis is making life precarious for billions of people and will increasingly foment environmental conflict, spur transnational migration, strain ecological systems, and exacerbate existing inequalities around the planet. 
 
This free, cross-disciplinary mini-course for K-12 educators will explore the global water crisis through attention to its geo-political, cultural, economic, and technological aspects, with particular attention to scholars and practitioners working within the environmental, political, and technological framework to address these challenges using a people-centered approach. Special attention will be given to the case of East Asia.
 
To register, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/CG3ZGrZvWfuMNU8DA
 
Day 2 Speakers

  

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)

 

Water Resource Management on the Tibetan Plateau with Comparative References to the California Water System 

with Dr. Roberta Soltz 

This presentation underscores water as a critical limiting resource for life on earth, and highlights its inequitable distribution as a key to understanding the ethical issues that always emerge when water management is discussed.  Examples of such ethical issues that have plagued both the Western United States and Northwestern China are compared. Questions that students typically ask about these complex issues are identified and discussed.

 

Dr. Roberta Soltz earned her doctorate in biology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982. She served for three years as an Ecologist for the Los Angeles District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. She then joined the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California where Dr. Soltz was appointed Director of Environmental Compliance. During her nearly 20-year career in flood control and water resource management, Dr. Soltz had a key role in negotiating critical environmental agreements for a variety of significant and precedent-setting projects including the Seven Oaks and Diamond Valley dams located in San Bernardino and Riverside counties, California. She earned the President’s Environmental and Conservation Challenge Award in 1992. In Washington, Dr. Soltz served on a number of governing boards including the Yakima Basin Storage Alliance, Kittitas County Board of Health Advisory Committee, Yakima Provincial Advisory Committee for the Okanogan and Wenatchee national forests and the Western Art Association.

 

Learning Progressions for How Students Make Sense of Water in Environmental Systems

with Dr. Kristin L. Gunckel, University of Arizona

Global water issues are part of socio-ecological systems, whereby the distribution and quality of fresh water is influenced by both natural and human forces. Understanding water issues requires understanding how water moves through environmental systems, in addition to understanding the social, political, and economic systems that affect how water is used and moved. In order to teach about the global water crisis, teachers need to understand how students make sense of how water moves through environmental systems and how to build on student sense-making in the curriculum, through instruction, and during assessment. This talk will provide an overview of a learning progression for water in environmental systems and how this framework can support teachers in understanding student thinking. Examples of curriculum materials, instructional tools, and formative assessments built on this learning progression will also be provided.

 

Kristin L. Gunckel is a professor of science education at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on developing empirically-grounded learning progressions for environmental science literacy, with an emphasis on water in environmental systems. She has been involved in numerous NSF-funded projects to develop learning progression-based curriculum materials, instructional tools, and formative assessments. In addition, Kristin has conducted teacher professional development for teaching about water and investigated teacher learning about learning progressions. Kristin received her PhD in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy from Michigan State University in 2008. 

 

Arc GIS Supplement with Dr. Thomas Mueller

 

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 2
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 17:30 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 1

 

February 8, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)
 
 
Significant portions of the world’s population lack access to sufficient quantities of water or to water of adequate quality – standards enshrined in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This unfolding global water crisis is making life precarious for billions of people and will increasingly foment environmental conflict, spur transnational migration, strain ecological systems, and exacerbate existing inequalities around the planet. 
 
This free, cross-disciplinary mini-course for K-12 educators will explore the global water crisis through attention to its geo-political, cultural, economic, and technological aspects, with particular attention to scholars and practitioners working within the environmental, political, and technological framework to address these challenges using a people-centered approach. Special attention will be given to the case of East Asia.
 
To register, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/CG3ZGrZvWfuMNU8DA
 
Day 1 Speakers

Monday, February 8, 2021

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) / 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm (Central Time)

Framing the Water Crisis: Ecological, Social, and Economic Perspectives on Water 

with Dr. Alexandra Straub

Using perspectives from environmental history, this talk emphasizes the relationships (economic, social, political, and ecological) between water and people and the complex ways these connections interact. A relational approach to water and society helps to frame global water problems in geographically and culturally distinct places. This talk also introduces the concept of modern water, or water divorced from its social context, and the hydrosocial cycle, a model that stresses the place of society in the water cycle.

 

Alexandra Straub is a historian interested in the intersection of environment, technology, culture and science. Her current research explores the history of chemical and mechanical water softening and water conditioning with a focus on the tools and processes created to manipulate water as well as people’s attitudes towards and definitions of water. She received her PhD in history from Temple University in 2020 and is currently the research coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh’s World History Center.

Reclaiming the Commons: Transnational Movements for the Right to Water 

with Caitlin Schroering

The privatization of water—led by global financial institutions working in collusion with governments and corporations–is documented time and again not to lead to more people gaining access to safe water. In fact, the opposite is true, with privatization leading to higher rates and lower quality water. For the past century, the dominant focus of transnational organizing has been “from the West to the rest” and the frequent attention to movements in the United States has led to the neglect of transnational linkages between movements. This project challenges the idea of the “West to rest” pattern and hypothesizes that today more transnational communications and organizing are occurring around water and other basic rights, and Northern movements are engaging with and learning from the South and vice versa, with Southern activists playing a more prominent role than previous scholarship demonstrates.  

 

Drawing on fieldwork conducted on two right to water movements that span three continents (North America, South America, and Africa), this presentationexamines efforts to reclaim the commons of water. These efforts have been driven by grassroots movements demanding that democracy, transparency, and the human right to water are above corporate profit. This research advances understanding of large-scale social change by investigating how water policies are shaped through contention among social movements, national and local governments, and corporations. It also provides insight on how water activists in local struggles see themselves in relation to the larger national and global network of water activists. 

 

Caitlin Schroering (she/her/hers) is a sixth year PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include environmental sociology, transnational social movements, resource conflicts, political economy/world-system analysis, and feminist and decolonial research methodologies. Her dissertation, titled The Global Economy, Resource Conflicts, and Transnational Social Movements: Dimensions of Resistance to Water Privatization, examines how social movements are mobilizing around water rights. Based on extensive fieldwork with two movements fighting against water privatization, one in Brazil and one in the United States (supported by a Tinker Grant, Nationality Rooms Scholarship, and predoctoral Mellon Fellowship from the University of Pittsburgh), she shows how global communications and organizing are occurring around water and global North movements are engaging with and learning from the global South and vice versa, with global South movements playing a more prominent and innovative role than previous scholarship demonstrates.

 

Arc GIS Supplement with Dr. Thomas Mueller

 

Teaching The Global Water Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Mini-course for K-12 Educators: Day 1
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 17:30 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 3

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces. 

An NCTA Mini-course for K-12 Educators

November 9, 11, 13, 2020 
6:00-8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

At an unprecedented moment in geopolitics, the work of public artists amplifies activism, resistance, and solidarity. Some of the world's most interesting art is on the streets and easily accessible to all. In this free NCTA mini-course for K-12 educators we will discuss how protest art uses public space to engage in dialogue between the artist and the public. Artists from around the world question "what is" and "why" that transcends national boundaries and politics. We will examine works of Ai Weiwei, Yayoi Kusama, Keith Haring, Loyalist murals from Northern Ireland, and the Black Lives movement. A teacher-led session at the end will be included.

Pennsylvania K-12 educators who want Act 48 must attend all three sessions;

Certificates of Completion will be given to teachers in other states who complete all three sessions.




To register for this program, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/S65gL23BAwEKnMyM7

 

Friday, November 13 

6:00 pm- 8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

 

Waking Up With 'Chu' - My Road to the Black Lives Matter Movement 

Jerome 'Chu' Charles, multidisciplinary artist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jerome “Chu” Charles is a multidisciplinary artist who started out with whatever crafts his mother was involved in until his teens where he picked up photography, which led to an interest in graffiti, which in practice led to illustration and painting, which is currently servicing him in his pursuit of muraling and sign painting. As his abilities grow through practice, he also hopes to learn how to use his gifts to service the world at large, using his point of view as a gay Black man in a military family in America.

 

 

Teacher led session: Creative Resistance Case Studies for the K-12 Classroom

 Michael-Ann Cerniglia, History Department Chair at Sewickley Academy

 

This session will examine the role that art and technology play in contemporary political movements around the world and how relevant case studies support curricular goals in the 7-12 classroom. By guiding students to examine politically motivated film, art, music, and digital communication, teachers can help students better understand how, throughout history, innovative ideas have sprung from censorship and repression which, over time, communicate goals and affect change. 

 

Michael-Ann Cerniglia is the Senior School History Department Chair at Sewickley Academy, an independent school north of Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches Grades 10-12 AP European history, AP US Government and Politics, and global studies electives. Most relevant to today's presentation, she developed and teaches a course called "Creative Resistance," which examines the convergence of art and politics.  At school, she commits her time to curriculum, equity and inclusion initiatives, student clubs, and professional development opportunities that present themselves. Michael-Ann is passionate about global experiences in teaching, literature, film, technology, communication, and travel. She resides in Pittsburgh, PA with her husband and two daughters.

 

 

                      Panoramas |   

This mini-course is hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, and Global Studies Center, and is co-sponsored by the European Studies Center, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Asian Studies Center.
Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 3
Friday, November 13, 2020 - 18:00 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 2

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces. 

An NCTA Mini-course for K-12 Educators

November 9, 11, 13, 2020 
6:00-8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

At an unprecedented moment in geopolitics, the work of public artists amplifies activism, resistance, and solidarity. Some of the world's most interesting art is on the streets and easily accessible to all. In this free NCTA mini-course for K-12 educators we will discuss how protest art uses public space to engage in dialogue between the artist and the public. Artists from around the world question "what is" and "why" that transcends national boundaries and politics. We will examine works of Ai Weiwei, Yayoi Kusama, Keith Haring, Loyalist murals from Northern Ireland, and the Black Lives movement. A teacher-led session at the end will be included.

Pennsylvania K-12 educators who want Act 48 must attend all three sessions;

Certificates of Completion will be given to teachers in other states who complete all three sessions.






To register for this program, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/S65gL23BAwEKnMyM7

Wednesday, November 11th 

6:00 pm- 8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

 

Kusama Yayoi:  Radical Performance as a Means of Self-Preservation and Social Critique 

Eric Shiner, Executive Director of Pioneer Works 

 

Now one of the “most important living artists” as deemed as such by the global capitalist art market, Kusama Yayoi enjoys top-tier status as a successful contemporaryartist.  However, this certainly was not always the case, as she spent decades in obscurity after an early bout with fame during her time lived in NYC (1957-1972) as a well-regarded and relevant artist.  Public art in the form of “happenings” was a major tenet of her early art-making, and also served as precursor to later, large-scale public installations and sculptures that highlight her characteristic dots and replication of objects.  In this talk, we will discuss how Kusama’s obsession with form and repetition found its start in performance meant to perpetrate society in radical gestures aimed at changing the status quo.   

Eric Shiner, Executive Director of Pioneer Works, brings with him a range of great experience to help bring Pioneer Works to the next level. From 2011-2016, he was the Director of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, after serving as the Milton Fine Curator of Art at the museum beginning in 2008. He was most recently the Artistic Director at White Cube Gallery here in New York. Prior to that he served as the Senior Vice President of Contemporary Art at Sotheby's. Throughout these experiences, Eric has demonstrated his commitment to lead in ways that promote diversity, inclusion and social justice.  

 

Loyalty in Dissent: Loyalist Public Murals in Pre- and Post-Ceasefire Northern Ireland 

Erin Hinson, Vice President of Research Development at Abbey Research 

 

In this talk, I will explore the complex and multi-faceted identity politics of loyalists in Northern Ireland. The presentation will examine how these politics are visualized, contested, and interrogated through the use of public mural displays. Loyalism in Northern Ireland is an intriguing construct – born of centuries of conflict and dissent around the intersections of religion, politics, land, and identity. This presentation will therefore start by briefly introducing the development of loyalism from the late 17th century to the early 20th. It will then cover the varying manifestations of loyalism throughout the 20th century conflict known colloquially as ‘the Troubles’ (1968-1994) and through the post-ceasefire period of economic investment, mural reimaging, and emerging cultural discourses (1994 to present).  

Public murals in Northern Ireland date to the early 20th century, and as such, this presentation will trace their evolution as cultural symbols, territory markers, and representations of dissent within several subgroups of loyalism. The presentation will utilize essential texts on mural displays, the past and present conflict landscape of Belfast, while employing images of murals to elucidate key themes. Northern Irish loyalism makes a fascinating case study of identity construction within a conflict zone because it differs from many popular conceptions about what ‘conflict’ looks like internationally. Further examinations of loyalism also complicate narratives about ‘the Troubles’ and expose the diverse visual and cultural landscapes of contemporary Northern Ireland.

 

Erin Hinson is the Vice President of Research Development at Abbey Research. She holds a PhD in Irish Studies from Queen’s University Belfast. She is published in the edited collections Ethnographies of Movement, Sociality and Space: Place-Making in the New Northern Ireland and The Carceral Network in Ireland: History, Agency and Resistance, and in the Global Discourse Journal Special Edition – Militancy and the Working Class. Her current research interests include prison systems and reforms, issues of paramilitary demobilization and reintegration, and their intersections with art and craft work. 

 

                 Panoramas |   
This mini-course is hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, and Global Studies Center, and is co-sponsored by the European Studies Center, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Asian Studies Center.

 

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 2
Wednesday, November 11, 2020 - 18:00 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 1

Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces. 

An NCTA Mini-course for K-12 Educators

November 9, 11, 13, 2020 
6:00-8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

At an unprecedented moment in geopolitics, the work of public artists amplifies activism, resistance, and solidarity. Some of the world's most interesting art is on the streets and easily accessible to all. In this free NCTA mini-course for K-12 educators we will discuss how protest art uses public space to engage in dialogue between the artist and the public. Artists from around the world question "what is" and "why" that transcends national boundaries and politics. We will examine works of Ai Weiwei, Yayoi Kusama, Keith Haring, Loyalist murals from Northern Ireland, and the Black Lives movement. A teacher-led session at the end will be included.

Pennsylvania K-12 educators who want Act 48 must attend all three sessions;
Certificates of Completion will be given to teachers in other states who complete all three sessions.



To register for this program, please click on the link here: https://forms.gle/S65gL23BAwEKnMyM7

 

Monday, November 9th 

6:00 pm- 8:30 pm (Eastern Time)

 

Visual Noise: Street Art in Activism and Placemaking in Bogotá Colombia

Dr. Caitlin Bruce, Department of Communications 

 

Public art has long been an important part of social justice practice. As a means of educating, shaping public feelings, highlighting issues of collective importance, and offering imaginative resources for creating different worlds, art is a rich communicative resource. In this presentation I offer a brief overview of some of the ways in which graffiti and muralism have served as a mechanism for collective voice, and then discuss the case of Bogotá, Colombia. In Bogotá graffiti, street art, and muralism—“arte urbano”—are one means to explore and critique ongoing issues of transitional justice. In particular, this presentation takes up the phenomenon of graffiti tours in Bogotá. It argues that two tours in particular: Grafficable and Bogota Graffiti Tour illuminate two challenges in using art as a mechanism for social justice: aestheticization, and context. 

 

Caitlin Bruce is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communications at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research is in the area of visual studies, affect studies, and critical theory. She is currently investigating the relationships between public art in urban spaces in transition within a transnational milieu. Largely focusing on graffiti and muralism, Bruce argues that such public art creates spaces for encounter between different publics, and between publics and central, peripheral, or marginal spaces. Her research takes her to Philadelphia, Chicago, New York, Paris, Perpignan, León Guanajuato, and Mexico City. She is currently working on a manuscript on transnational public art.  Caitlin is this year’s Global Academic Partnership fellow through the Global Studies Center. 

 

 

Ai Weiwei:  Art Shall Liberate the World 

Eric Shiner, Executive Director of Pioneer Works

 

Perhaps no other artist working today is as important as Ai Weiwei in terms of commitment to affecting actual change in the global political and social realities of our age.Working across myriad media, and with a special emphasis on high-impact and broadly democratic public art, Ai Weiwei has become a critical voice in activist and social justice-centric art making over the course of his entire career.  In this talk, we will examine not only works of art made by Ai Weiwei, but will also look at his role as a major force of positive societal change and how governments and institutionshave navigated his powerful voice. 

Eric Shiner, Executive Director. Pioneer Works 

Eric brings with him a range of great experience to help bring Pioneer Works to the next level. From 2011-2016, he was the Director of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, after serving as the Milton Fine Curator of Art at the museum beginning in 2008. He was most recently the Artistic Director at White Cube Gallery here in New York. Prior to that he served as the Senior Vice President of Contemporary Art at Sotheby's. Throughout these experiences, Eric has demonstrated his commitment to lead in ways that promote diversity, inclusion and social justice.  

 

 

                 Panoramas |   
This mini-course is hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, and Global Studies Center, and is co-sponsored by the European Studies Center, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Asian Studies Center.
Public Art + Dissent: Art, Protest, and Public Spaces: An NCTA Mini-Course for K-12 Educators - Day 1
Monday, November 9, 2020 - 18:00 to 20:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online via Zoom

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Taiko: Tradition as the Basis for Innovation

Taiko: Tradition as a Basis for Innovation

Thursday, June 18

6:00 - 7:30 p.m. ET (5:00-6:30 CT)

Dr. Benjamin Pachter, Executive Director, Japan-America Society of Central Ohio

Taiko can be found in a wide variety of performance venues in modern Japan, from the imperial court to regional festival processions to large concert halls. This presentation will explore the many ways in which taiko are used in Japan today, including the contemporary group performance style that has spread across the world since World War II and integrates a wide range of musical and visual influences.

 

Registration Required: Please click here to register.

Part of the Series
 

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Online Mini Course for Educators

 Co-sponsored by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh NCTA

 

Join us for “The Sound of (Japanese) Music,” a series of presentations and demos by four Japanese music ethnomusicologists. Designed to take you to a deeper level of understanding of traditional Japanese music, these presentations expand your knowledge of Japanese history and culture, including modern music innovations. You will learn about the evolving traditions of the kotoshakuhachishamisen and the recent development of taiko drumming. Some presentations will be recorded for your use later with your students. All sessions will be held through Zoom.   

The programs will be conducted by Zoom. You can sign up for one or all of these presentations. Act 48 for Pennsylvania teachers provided. Certificates of Completion available upon request for teachers who attend all four sessions.

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Taiko: Tradition as the Basis for Innovation
Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 18:00 to 19:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Strings Revolution: History and Music of Shamisen and Geisha

Strings Revolution: History and Music of Shamisen and Geisha

Thursday, June 11

6:00 - 7:30 p.m. ET (5:00-6:30 CT)

Dr. Yuko Eguchi Wright, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh

In the mid-1500s, the soundscapes of Japan dramatically changed because of the introduction of a three-stringed instrument—the shamisen. This presentation covers the historical background of shamisen and its music, particularly focusing on the songs practiced among geisha. It includes a demonstration and virtual hands-on session of shamisen songs.

 

Registration Required: Please click here to register.
Part of the Series
 

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Online Mini Course for Educators

 Co-sponsored by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh NCTA

Join us for “The Sound of (Japanese) Music,” a series of presentations and demos by four Japanese music ethnomusicologists. Designed to take you to a deeper level of understanding of traditional Japanese music, these presentations expand your knowledge of Japanese history and culture, including modern music innovations. You will learn about the evolving traditions of the kotoshakuhachishamisen and the recent development of taiko drumming. Some presentations will be recorded for your use later with your students. All sessions will be held through Zoom.   

The programs will be conducted by Zoom. You can sign up for one or all of these presentations. Act 48 for Pennsylvania teachers provided. Certificates of Completion available upon request for teachers who attend all four sessions.

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Strings Revolution: History and Music of Shamisen and Geisha
Thursday, June 11, 2020 - 18:00 to 19:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: the Shakuhachi, its History, and its Music

The World in a Single Sound - the Shakuhachi, its History, and its Music

Thursday, May 21

6:00 - 7:30 p.m. ET (5:00-6:30 CT)

Devon Osamu Tipp, PhD Candidate in Music Theory/Composition, University of Pittsburgh

Steeped in the aesthetics of Zen Buddhism, traditional shakuhachi repertoire focuses on the discovery of the world that lies within a single note, a single sound. This presentation will introduce you to the history of shakuhachi, as well as some of the fundamental aesthetic concepts that continue to capture audiences hearts and minds.

 

Registration Required: Please click here to register.
Part of the Series
 

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Online Mini Course for Educators

 Co-sponsored by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh NCTA

Join us for “The Sound of (Japanese) Music,” a series of presentations and demos by four Japanese music ethnomusicologists. Designed to take you to a deeper level of understanding of traditional Japanese music, these presentations expand your knowledge of Japanese history and culture, including modern music innovations. You will learn about the evolving traditions of the kotoshakuhachishamisen and the recent development of taiko drumming. Some presentations will be recorded for your use later with your students. All sessions will be held through Zoom.   

The programs will be conducted by Zoom. You can sign up for one or all of these presentations. Act 48 for Pennsylvania teachers provided. Certificates of Completion available upon request for teachers who attend all four sessions.

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: the Shakuhachi, its History, and its Music
Thursday, May 21, 2020 - 18:00 to 19:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Koto: Its Music and Musicians, Yesterday and Today

Koto: Its Music and Musicians, Yesterday and Today

Thursday, May 14

6:00 - 7:30 p.m. ET (5:00-6:30 CT)

Dr. Anne Prescott, Director, Five College Center for East Asian Studies

Music for the koto is a living, evolving tradition shaped by its past. Explore the history, present and future possibilities of the music and musicians of the koto world. This presentation will also include a brief overview and timeline of traditional Japanese music genres.

Registration Required: Please click here to register.
Part of the Series
 

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Online Mini Course for Educators

 Co-sponsored by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh NCTA

Join us for “The Sound of (Japanese) Music,” a series of presentations and demos by four Japanese music ethnomusicologists. Designed to take you to a deeper level of understanding of traditional Japanese music, these presentations expand your knowledge of Japanese history and culture, including modern music innovations. You will learn about the evolving traditions of the kotoshakuhachishamisen and the recent development of taiko drumming. Some presentations will be recorded for your use later with your students. All sessions will be held through Zoom.   

The programs will be conducted by Zoom. You can sign up for one or all of these presentations. Act 48 for Pennsylvania teachers provided. Certificates of Completion available upon request for teachers who attend all four sessions.

The Sound of (Japanese) Music: Koto: Its Music and Musicians, Yesterday and Today
Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 18:00 to 19:30
Online Mini Course
Event Location: 
Online